Horrific Leopard Security Snafu/Parental Controls

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
This is unbelievable. I gave my G4 Powerbook to my 12 year old son as I had recently purchased a MacBook Pro. Having bsod issues, I did a clean install of Leopard on his computer. I created a profile for myself as administrator and one for my son. I had no documents or mail in my profile. I put a 'curfew' on my son's profile, so that he couldn't go on between midnight and 6 am. Now here comes the perfect storm. The computer told him it was after midnight (even though it wasn't). The screen went blue and then he found himself in my profile (which is password protected). He happened upon Mail where lo and behold, all of my .Mac mail had mysteriously moved from my .Mac email account online, right into Mail. Where my son saw some emails he really had no business seeing. I went into mail, and there was my .Mac account activated in preferences. I deleted it. Close Mail. When I went back in, it had re-added the .Mac account and had set itself to transfer all emails from .Mac to Mail once again. I took a look at my .Mac account online and all the emails were gone. This is an appalling set of circumstances. I have no idea how it happened. The .Mac account in Mail had my username and password without my ever having put them in there. Now, the only explanation is that both his notebook and mine have the same computer name. But if I didn't set up the account, how did it get there. More importantly, how was my user login password circumvented by Leopard? And how did it put my .Mac user info into Mail without me knowing?



Ugghhhh.



lawguy51

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    Are you running 10.5 or 10.5.1? Apple made some security fixes in 10.5.1. Other than that, i don't know how that happened.
  • Reply 2 of 11
    ipeonipeon Posts: 1,122member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lawguy51 View Post


    The computer told him it was after midnight (even though it wasn't). The screen went blue and then he found himself in my profile (which is password protected).



    Why would you create a profile that is the same as your .mac account on a computer that isn't yours? Yes, it may have been yours, but you gave it to your son. It's his now. There's your first mistake.



    Quote:

    The screen went blue and then he found himself in my profile



    hmmmm, how exactly did he find himself in your administrative profile? Did you see this happen or is this what he told you? What is your password, what I mean is, could he have figured out your password?



    Quote:

    I created a profile for myself as administrator and one for my son.



    Does he have access to the Date & Time preferences pane? If so he could easily change the time thereby circumventing your 'curfew'.



    There's preferences in Mail with regards to what to do with the mail at .mac, that may be how you lost your mail residing in your .mac account.
  • Reply 3 of 11
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iPeon View Post


    Why would you create a profile that is the same as your .mac account on a computer that isn't yours? Yes, it may have been yours, but you gave it to your son. It's his now. There's your first mistake. .



    Totally agree with that one. But there's no way he cracked my password and therefore, why/how did Leopard let him into my profile? I only created it so that I could control his. My settings on .Mac were not set to forward my mail to my pop account because if they had been, they would have ended up on my Macbook Pro, which they didn't. Very weird.



    lawguy51
  • Reply 4 of 11
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lawguy51 View Post


    Totally agree with that one. But there's no way he cracked my password and therefore, why/how did Leopard let him into my profile? I only created it so that I could control his. My settings on .Mac were not set to forward my mail to my pop account because if they had been, they would have ended up on my Macbook Pro, which they didn't. Very weird.



    lawguy51



    Might I suggest, It's possible that your son got your password somehow? There are many ways this could have happened:



    1) Many people ignore security advisories never to write down passwords, and write them down somewhere so they don't forget it.

    2) Some people choose passwords that have special significance to them. Favorite sports team, mothers maiden name. These are insecure, and especially for family members, easy to guess.

    3) Saved passwords. Web browsers such as Firefox can store passwords you enter, and Firefox stores passwords using it's own system, not the global Keychain system. Most people DON'T have a master password set in Firefox that would prevent someone from viewing a list of all logins and passwords. Likewise, Keychain stores passwords used throughout all of Mac OS X. If left unprotected, your son could have easily gotten on to any of your computers while not in use – even for just for a moment while you were out of the room or not looking – and found some of the passwords.

    4) Although I'm not aware of any Keylogger for Mac that is capable of logging things typed into encrypted fields (password fields), there are keyloggers that can log things typed in plain text (everything else). If you son was feeling particularly fiendish one day, and somehow got access to an account on any of your computers (i.e. you left it logged on or something), he could have installed it hoping you would enter the password in plain text accidentally – for example, in the username field.

    5) Looking over your shoulder.
  • Reply 5 of 11
    elronelron Posts: 126member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lawguy51 View Post


    Where my son saw some emails he really had no business seeing.



    Were they sexy emails?
  • Reply 6 of 11
    pbpb Posts: 4,233member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by elron View Post


    Were they sexy emails?



    While they could be, you know there are other things also you would not like to show to children.
  • Reply 7 of 11
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PB View Post


    While they could be, you know there are other things also you would not like to show to children.



    Like...?



    It's not like the kid is going to be interested in a bank statement or anything work-related.
  • Reply 8 of 11
    pbpb Posts: 4,233member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by icfireball View Post


    It's not like the kid is going to be interested in a bank statement or anything work-related.



    From that statement alone I can safely assume that you don't have children.
  • Reply 9 of 11
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PB View Post


    From that statement alone I can safely assume that you don't have children.



    We'll seeing as I AM a child (teen)...
  • Reply 10 of 11
    pbpb Posts: 4,233member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by icfireball View Post


    We'll seeing as I AM a child (teen)...



    OK. How old are you now, if I am not asking too much?
  • Reply 11 of 11
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PB View Post


    OK. How old are you now, if I am not asking too much?



    16. Prime trouble-making age.
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