Leopard bug fix list swells to 130 in latest Mac OS X 10.5.2 seed

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
Apple this week provided its developer community with yet another pre-release build of its upcoming Leopard operating system update, which remains on tap for a release sometime this month.



Like the build that preceded it, Mac OS X 10.5.2 build 9C27 is reportedly free of known issues. It did, however, add several more fixes to update's now expansive list of over 130 improvements.



Among the latest additions were fixes to Leopard's Finder sidebar, desktop backgrounds, iChat's Bluetooth functionality, Time Machine, and disk space management, according to those people familiar with the software.



Again, like previous builds, Apple is reported to have asked that its developers focus the majority of their testing efforts on about a dozen core system components such as Audio Input, Bluetooth, the Finder, Graphics Drivers and Spotlight.



Joining the growing list of subtle refinements in Mac OS X 10.5.2 are several more significant feature additions, such as support for Remote Disc optical drive sharing on existing Macs, a list view in Stacks, and support for Apple's new Time Capsule backup appliance.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 47
    Any estimates for the size of this bad boy?
  • Reply 2 of 47
    phizzphizz Posts: 142member
    As long as it fixes Photoshop CS3 text input issues I'll be happy. Oh, and make Mail stop crashing.
  • Reply 3 of 47
    jowie74jowie74 Posts: 540member
    All I want to know is... When??
  • Reply 4 of 47
    rolsrols Posts: 56member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jowie74 View Post


    All I want to know is... When??



    probably the same week as the new macbook pros .. 2010 at this rate \
  • Reply 5 of 47
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    This is odd for Apple. We now have 3 point release seeds that have had no known issues.





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jpellino View Post


    Any estimates for the size of this bad boy?



    Last seeds weighed in at over 400MB.
  • Reply 6 of 47
    OK, this might be a dumb question (I am blond after all), but in order to become a developer one has to belong to the developer community, which requires a membership fee, is that correct? If that is the case, the only way any one can acquire these Leopard beta seeds is to pay and become an ADC member. Thus, you are in effect paying to work on a beta for Apple, so you are essentially paying to work for Apple. Does that make sense?
  • Reply 7 of 47
    jowie74jowie74 Posts: 540member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rols View Post


    probably the same week as the new macbook pros .. 2010 at this rate \



    Ten minutes past eight? Tonight??
  • Reply 8 of 47
    mactelmactel Posts: 1,275member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jpellino View Post


    Any estimates for the size of this bad boy?



    No, but it is probably larger than the original installation package.



    Man, with that many fixes I'm gonna hold off a few days from release to witness any carnage.
  • Reply 9 of 47
    lafelafe Posts: 252member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jowie74 View Post


    All I want to know is... When??



    It has to be very very soon, since MacBook Airs are shipping and arriving now.



    We can't have the MBA users living without Remote Disk, can we?
  • Reply 10 of 47
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Lafe View Post


    It has to be very very soon, since MacBook Airs are shipping and arriving now.



    We can't have the MBA users living without Remote Disk, can we?



    MBA comes with a Remote Disc install disc for pre-10.5.2 Macs and Windows machines.
  • Reply 11 of 47
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CJD2112 View Post


    OK, this might be a dumb question (I am blond after all), but in order to become a developer one has to belong to the developer community, which requires a membership fee, is that correct? If that is the case, the only way any one can acquire these Leopard beta seeds is to pay and become an ADC member. Thus, you are in effect paying to work on a beta for Apple, so you are essentially paying to work for Apple. Does that make sense?



    Not specifically, no. You can become an ADC member for free and gain access to certain downloads (documentation and development tools). To gain access to pre-release (beta) software, however, you do need to have a paid membership. This is intended so that software developers can test their applications against upcoming releases, to ensure compatibility, not necessarily so they can become beta testers for Apple (although this is one of the fortunate side-effects of the developer seeds, and allows Apple to get their pre-releases into the hands of the real-world community).



    Frankly, I agree with the philosophy here. Paid members are more likely to adhere to NDAs, 'lest they risk losing access to the tools that allow them to ensure their software is compatible with the majority of users.
  • Reply 12 of 47
    sabonsabon Posts: 133member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CJD2112 View Post


    OK, this might be a dumb question (I am blond after all), but in order to become a developer one has to belong to the developer community, which requires a membership fee, is that correct? If that is the case, the only way any one can acquire these Leopard beta seeds is to pay and become an ADC member. Thus, you are in effect paying to work on a beta for Apple, so you are essentially paying to work for Apple. Does that make sense?



    That is not what you are paying for. You are paying for OTHER tools and support that you can't get without paying.



    It just HAPPENS that you also get updates to Mac OS X before the public does so you can test YOUR program against the updates to make sure nothing in your program broke. If you didn't get that, developers would be screaming because their software wasn't ready when the update came out. Or didn't have a chance to have it fixed before an update came out.
  • Reply 13 of 47
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CJD2112 View Post


    OK, this might be a dumb question (I am blond after all), but in order to become a developer one has to belong to the developer community, which requires a membership fee, is that correct? If that is the case, the only way any one can acquire these Leopard beta seeds is to pay and become an ADC member. Thus, you are in effect paying to work on a beta for Apple, so you are essentially paying to work for Apple. Does that make sense?



    Don't over simplify benefits, you are not paying for the seeding of betas alone. Developer community comes with many benefits & paying for this is not just an Apple thing, MSN is also a developer community that you pay for though I believe it is less of a community than Apple's.



    You are also paying because it allows you to be up on the direction an OS is going so that you can make your products compatible. Yes Apple gets benefits from you testing their betas but they use these communities because of the raised level of trust & technical understanding. Seeding to a bunch of standard users makes no more sense than trying to gain technical know how from a forum full of non-technical people. You can't learn anything about what is going wrong if the people complaining to you don't understand it themselves.



    Understand now?
  • Reply 14 of 47
    *Crosses fingers* Less then 400mbs please. Less then 400mbs please.



    Having a max download speed of 40KB/s sucks. Oh well.
  • Reply 15 of 47
    lafelafe Posts: 252member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    MBA comes with a Remote Disc install disc for pre-10.5.2 Macs and Windows machines.



    I didn't know that. Thanks for the info!
  • Reply 16 of 47
    foo2foo2 Posts: 1,077member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CJD2112 View Post


    OK, this might be a dumb question (I am blond after all), but in order to become a developer one has to belong to the developer community, which requires a membership fee, is that correct? If that is the case, the only way any one can acquire these Leopard beta seeds is to pay and become an ADC member. Thus, you are in effect paying to work on a beta for Apple, so you are essentially paying to work for Apple. Does that make sense?



    While it might seem Apple should be paying developers to help fix their software, it behooves everyone with an interest in better system software and better application compatibility to participate in the process. It costs Apple significant money to interact with developers, and I'm sure an entrance fee helps keep the unproductive chatter to a minimum. The standard ADC membership fee of $500/year includes support from Apple for issues raised by developers, with premium membership fees ($3500/year?) receiving support for more issues and free admission to the annual developers conference. Apple also gives ADC members a modest discount on hardware, which can more than offset the cost of the membership fee. Academics can join ADC for only $99/year and receive hardware discounts, but they do not receive beta seeds. Developers working on applications in critical market areas may be offered by Apple free participation in relevant beta seeding programs but they do not receive hardware discounts.
  • Reply 17 of 47
    foo2foo2 Posts: 1,077member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Monkeyoe View Post


    *Crosses fingers* Less then 400mbs please. Less then 400mbs please.



    Remember, the rumored size of the 10.5.2 updates being seeded includes code for both PPC and Intel, as well as graphics drivers for perhaps all Mac models, so the seeds are going to be much bulkier than what will be sucked down by Software Update on a given computer.
  • Reply 18 of 47
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hezekiahb View Post


    Don't over simplify benefits, you are not paying for the seeding of betas alone.



    I don't think they're over simplifying things, they just don't know the whole reason of becoming an Apple developer.



    The way Leopard came out, I'm definitely waiting to upgrade the next OS since it'll probably also be in such an unfinished condition.
  • Reply 19 of 47
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Foo2 View Post


    While it might seem Apple should be paying developers to help fix their software, it behooves everyone with an interest in better system software and better application compatibility to participate in the process. It costs Apple significant money to interact with developers, and I'm sure an entrance fee helps keep the unproductive chatter to a minimum. The standard ADC membership fee of $500/year includes support from Apple for issues raised by developers, with premium membership fees ($3500/year?) receiving support for more issues and free admission to the annual developers conference. Apple also gives ADC members a modest discount on hardware, which can more than offset the cost of the membership fee. Academics can join ADC for only $99/year and receive hardware discounts, but they do not receive beta seeds. Developers working on applications in critical market areas may be offered by Apple free participation in relevant beta seeding programs but they do not receive hardware discounts.



    Thanks for clearing that up (and for not flaming me, I'm surprised so many people jumped on my case for a simple question. Sheesh).
  • Reply 20 of 47
    foo2foo2 Posts: 1,077member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    This is odd for Apple. We now have 3 point release seeds that have had no known issues.



    Do you really believe that?
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