Time Machine remains focal point of Mac OS X 10.5.2 testing

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
The stability and performance of Time Machine, Apple's easy-to-use backup software included with Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard, remains one of the final focus areas for testers evaluating the company's impending 10.5.2 operating system update.



Following up on build Mac OS X 10.5.2 build 9C27, which was released privately to developers last Thursday, Apple on Monday evening issued yet another build labeled 9C30.



Like the two builds that preceded it, build 9C30 is said to contain no known issues. According to those familiar with the distribution, it also tacks on three more fixes to an already exhaustive list stretching some 135 items long.



Of the three new fixes, two target Time Machine -- one implementing a fix for restoring data from backup images and a second involving tweaks to the software's underlying BackupCore framework. When combined with earlier code revisions in previous builds, that brings the total number of Time Machine-related fixes in Mac OS X 10.5.2 Update to 10.



Additionally, Mac OS 10.5.2 build 93C0 is reported to have seen its list of core focus areas reduced from 13 to 9. Chief among those areas remaining as focal points are Time Machine, audio input, Back To My Mac, Bluetooth, Safari, and graphics drivers.



Mac OS X 10.5.2, which includes support for Apple's soon-to-be-released Time Capsule backup appliance, would need to see a release sometime this month in order for the company to make good on its self-imposed ship deadline for that product.



Other features expected as part of the Leopard update include support for a new array of multi-touch trackpad-endabled MacBook Pros, support for Remote Disc optical drive sharing on existing Macs, and a new list view in Stacks.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 42
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Like the two builds that preceded it, build 9C30 is said to contain no known issues.



    I believe this is the fourth build with no known issues: 9C20, 9C23, 9C27 & 9C30.
  • Reply 2 of 42
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    I believe this is the fourth build with no known issues: 9C20, 9C23, 9C27 & 9C30.



    This makes me believe they are just engaging in disinformation. Why not just say there are issues? It's obvious to me that if 9C30 tacked on three new fixes, those three fixes didn't exist in 9C27. Therefore there are issues. It appears to me that the "no known issues" statement from Apple can not be trusted.
  • Reply 3 of 42
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Brian Green View Post


    This makes me believe they are just engaging in disinformation. Why not just say there are issues? It's obvious to me that if 9C30 tacked on three new fixes, those three fixes didn't exist in 9C27. Therefore there are issues. It appears to me that the "no known issues" statement from Apple can not be trusted.



    I would suggest that Apple released the build with no known issues but the testers found some more bugs that needed to be fixed before going gold. Just because this has happened more than usual isn't any reason to raise alarm.



    As a side note I'm really looking forward to Time Capsule and plan on getting one for my home and also for my parents so I really hope they have ALL the Time Machine bugs worked out.
  • Reply 4 of 42
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by etandrib View Post


    I would suggest that Apple released the build with no known issues but the testers found some more bugs that needed to be fixed before going gold. Just because this has happened more than usual isn't any reason to raise alarm.



    As a side note I'm really looking forward to Time Capsule and plan on getting one for my home and also for my parents so I really hope they have ALL the Time Machine bugs worked out.



    I agree completely that it's important to have all the bugs worked out. I just think Apple ought not use the words, "no known issues". That implies to me that their code is pristine and flawless. We all know that it'll never be that way. All this work on a point release makes me wonder if they are going to reallocate their engineers to some other project after this. Seems to me like they are really trying to snuff out everything right here at 10.5.2. It makes me wonder what they are up to.
  • Reply 5 of 42
    gqbgqb Posts: 1,934member
    One thing I'd like to see added to Time Machine is the ability to create a positive backup list as opposed to negative. Currently you can exclude directories from backup, but there are so many of those, that I'd prefer to have the option to just say back up this, this, and this.

    (Of course what I'd really like is for $$ to loosen up enough for me to be able to get a big honkin' backup drive.)

  • Reply 6 of 42
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Brian Green View Post


    This makes me believe they are just engaging in disinformation. Why not just say there are issues? It's obvious to me that if 9C30 tacked on three new fixes, those three fixes didn't exist in 9C27. Therefore there are issues. It appears to me that the "no known issues" statement from Apple can not be trusted.



    It depends how you define issues. Software can always be improved upon. These new builds may be adding a simple new feature once each build reveals that there isn't any issues, optimizing the build for better performance or they are waiting for a particular date to release it and happen to be ahead of schedule this time around.



    Whatever the reason, 4 developer builds with no known issues is a very good thing.
  • Reply 7 of 42
    cubertcubert Posts: 728member
    For me, Time Machine has 2 problems - it freezes up when entering the Time Machine "space field" during a backup and the time on the backups is off by about 15 minutes vs. my computer's time (which is set by the Apple servers and is correct).



    HOWEVER, last week Time Machine saved my @$$!!! I accidentally made a major irreversible change to a file and hosed it. Time Machine to the rescue! 2 minutes later I was back up and running.
  • Reply 8 of 42
    mr. hmr. h Posts: 4,724member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GQB View Post


    One thing I'd like to see added to Time Machine is the ability to create a positive backup list as opposed to negative. Currently you can exclude directories from backup, but there are so many of those, that I'd prefer to have the option to just say back up this, this, and this.

    (Of course what I'd really like is for $$ to loosen up enough for me to be able to get a big honkin' backup drive.)





    Sounds like Carbon Copy Cloner might be more suitable for your needs.
  • Reply 9 of 42
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GQB View Post


    One thing I'd like to see added to Time Machine is the ability to create a positive backup list as opposed to negative. Currently you can exclude directories from backup, but there are so many of those, that I'd prefer to have the option to just say back up this, this, and this.

    (Of course what I'd really like is for $$ to loosen up enough for me to be able to get a big honkin' backup drive.)





    That's the problem I ran into with Time Machine. I have a Mac Pro that I dropped two 750GB drives into (and stripe RAID'ed them for a wonderful 1.5TB of elbow room) and moved the included 250GB drive into the third bay for basic storage. I have a 500GB external FW800 drive for Time Machine. The bad news is that the only way to back up everything is to have a Time Machine drive bigger than the drive you're backing up. Makes things difficult because you're not truly backing up everything. I had to exclude my Movies folder entirely (I shoot and edit HD 1080i footage) in order to drop below the threshold of my external.



    I guess I just have to buy a huge 2TB external for my Time Machine backup if I want to backup everything.
  • Reply 10 of 42
    mr. hmr. h Posts: 4,724member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    Whatever the reason, 4 developer builds with no known issues is a very good thing.



    I'm pretty sure that the "no known issues" means "there are no known issues with the things we reckon we've fixed". It doesn't mean "this build of OS X has no bugs".



    I'm willing to bet that the number of open bugs for OS X numbers in the 1,000s.
  • Reply 11 of 42
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Brian Green View Post


    I just think Apple ought not use the words, "no known issues". That implies to me that their code is pristine and flawless.



    What part of "known" is difficult to comprehend? That does no in any way imply that anything is flawless or pristine. It only states that Apple is unaware of any issues at the time of the build's release. The release to the larger developer community will help to find any issues that may be affecting commercial apps. If any are found Apple will fix accordingly and do internal testing, if the testing results are positive they may release another build without any known issues, again.
  • Reply 12 of 42
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    It depends how you define issues. Software can always be improved upon. These new builds may be adding a simple new feature once each build reveals that there isn't any issues, optimizing the build for better performance or they are waiting for a particular date to release it and happen to be ahead of schedule this time around.



    Whatever the reason, 4 developer builds with no known issues is a very good thing.



    Oh, I agree that four builds with no known issues is a good thing. I'd simply like them to be more descriptive with what they are adding. I know Apple will always be vague at best so it's a moot point.



    The thing that keeps jumping into my head is I wonder if they are working on hammering out all of these bugs now and really making Leopard shine, what they are going to be doing with the rest of their point updates. Seems to me like they are going all out of squash every bug right here and now.



    It makes me wonder...
  • Reply 13 of 42
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,254member
    looks like 10.5.2 will be one solid update all round.



    Side bar: Off Topic I know but had to share ... As I have owned multiple Apple dealerships and a Mac software company I get asked by a lot of friends for help on Macs. One elderly lady I know phoned yesterday as she had a lot of problems with her new Computer. I was confused at first until I realized she didn't even have a Mac. She had bought a PC with Vista. When I pointed this out she assured me she had asked if they sold 'Apples' and she said "The young man assured me an Acer with Vista was the same thing. Vista is Apple and much better then XP as it had all the safety of OS X but this was just Microsoft's version of Apple." I was speechless!
  • Reply 14 of 42
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post


    I'm pretty sure that the "no known issues" means "there are no known issues with the things we reckon we've fixed". It doesn't mean "this build of OS X has no bugs".



    I'm willing to bet that the number of open bugs for OS X numbers in the 1,000s.



    And that's more along the lines of what I think they need to state. It at least keeps things real and open for everyone to see. With thousands left to go, it doesn't make me wonder what they'll do with the rest of the point updates. This way I can see that they are a long way off from completion of Leopard (and may never even squash all the bugs before moving onto the next cat).
  • Reply 15 of 42
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Brian Green View Post


    This makes me believe they are just engaging in disinformation. Why not just say there are issues? It's obvious to me that if 9C30 tacked on three new fixes, those three fixes didn't exist in 9C27. Therefore there are issues. It appears to me that the "no known issues" statement from Apple can not be trusted.



    Quit wining about "no known issues". Apple isn't trying to fool anyone, they are letting the developers know that Apple is unaware of any issues so that the developers know to inform them of EVERY bug they find. If Apple lists known issues that is for the purpose of letting developers know what they are aware of, it isn't a confession to perfection or imperfection.



    You people will wine about anything! This information wasn't even originally intended for you anyway, the information was for the developers & AppleInsider has been nice enough to help us not be in the dark on progress.
  • Reply 16 of 42
    Give them all the time they need to get it right.. well, as long as its included in the new MacBook Pro release, i'd be happy

    wouldn't want to see this happening all over again



    this = http://video.msn.com/video.aspx?vid=...8-bbc5950107f1
  • Reply 17 of 42
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Brian Green View Post


    And that's more along the lines of what I think they need to state. It at least keeps things real and open for everyone to see. With thousands left to go, it doesn't make me wonder what they'll do with the rest of the point updates. This way I can see that they are a long way off from completion of Leopard (and may never even squash all the bugs before moving onto the next cat).



    You can append whatever you wish to the end of "no known issues." That statement is for developers and it is well known what is implied. As previously stated, no software is ever complete. At the very least, it can always be optimized further.
  • Reply 18 of 42
    Does anyone know definitively if the latest build lets Time Machine back up to a disk attached to an Airport Extreme? (Here's hoping Leopard 10.5.2 enables this!)
  • Reply 19 of 42
    This is good news, because Time Machine has some critical issues in 10.5.1, including errors and even kernel panics when trying to resume a backup that was interrupted unexpectedly (e.g. as a result of another kernel panic, or something that killed or locked up the backupd process or one of its parents). I've had to delete the ".inProgress" file after several interrupted backups to get Time Machine working again.



    Time Machine seems to work very well otherwise, so it will be nice to get the remaining issues ironed out.
  • Reply 20 of 42
    noirdesirnoirdesir Posts: 1,027member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post


    I'm pretty sure that the "no known issues" means "there are no known issues with the things we reckon we've fixed". It doesn't mean "this build of OS X has no bugs".



    I'm willing to bet that the number of open bugs for OS X numbers in the 1,000s.



    I would formulate it slightly differently: "There no real issues right know that we intend to fix before release" as opposed to "There are some issues that we still intend to fix before release, so don't bother to report them and don't worry about them, we know they are there and we intend to fix them"
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