Incredibly long start-up time

Posted:
in Genius Bar edited January 2014
Hey, when ever I start up my mac (which isn't often, I hardly ever shut it down) it takes forever to startup. To be more precise, after I log in I get the spinning beachball of death for about 5 minutes.



Is there a way of knowing what is taking so long to start up? I have noticed that this started after I did a big update of a lot of apps on my computer.



btw I am using a 17in MBP 2.16 Core Duo with 2 gig's of ram. So it really shouldn't be taking so long.



Any thoughts?



And secondly, in my Startupitems folder is a folder called "Aladdin", I have no idea what this does. Can I trash it?

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 4
    bclapperbclapper Posts: 237member
    Aladdin Spring Cleaning for Mac?
  • Reply 2 of 4
    idunnoidunno Posts: 645member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bclapper View Post


    Aladdin Spring Cleaning for Mac?



    Huh? Was that helping?
  • Reply 3 of 4
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iDunno View Post


    Hey, when ever I start up my mac (which isn't often, I hardly ever shut it down) it takes forever to startup. To be more precise, after I log in I get the spinning beachball of death for about 5 minutes. Is there a way of knowing what is taking so long to start up? I have noticed that this started after I did a big update of a lot of apps on my computer.



    Could possibly be HDD failure, but to eliminate the possibility of any OS X corruptions causing the problem you might want to backup your data and perform a clean install of OS X. Here's how...



    1. If you're running Leopard, plug-in an external HDD and do a full Time Machine backup of all items on your Mac. Then skip to step 4. If you have no external HDD move to the next step...



    2. No external HDD? No problem! Let's go to Applications > Utilities > Disk Utility and click the Partition tab, click the + symbol to add a new partition, name the partition 'Time Machine HD' or whatever else you want and set the size of the new partition big enough to hold all your files. Make sure it's formatted to Mac OS Entended (Journaled). And click Apply to have the new partition created.



    3. Now go to System Preferences > Time Machine and set 'Time Machine HD' as your new backup disk. Allow Time Machine to complete a full backup. Then you're ready to reinstall OS X.



    4. Insert your OS X Install Disc, click Install OS X and the Mac will reboot, when loaded, click Options in the bottom-left on one of the first few windows, and choose Erase & Install then continue to follow the on screen instructions, making sure you perform the install on Macintosh HD. When OS X has been installed and you're met with the initial setup screens continue until you come to a Transfer Your Information window, choose the option to transfer information from a Time Machine Backup, then select 'Time Machine HD' or your external drive, followed by the items you wish to restore. Then all your files, folders, applications, network settings etc will be completely restored.



    5. When complete you'll find yourself back in OS X, hopefully a bit quicker than before, if so - problem solved. Now run Software Update as you'll be back to 10.5.0 so you'll need to catch up!



    6. If you didn't use an external HDD you'll want to go back to Disk Utility, click the Partition tab, click 'Time Machine HD' on the partition table and click the - symbol to remove the partition, ensure Macintosh HD occupies the full height of the partition table and click Apply to set your hard drive back to the size it was before.



    If you're not running Leopard, backup your data manually and reinstall OS X in the same way, ignoring all references to Time Machine If your Mac still takes a lifetime to boot after a clean install then it's likely your HDD is failing and will need replacing before the drive fails completely.
  • Reply 4 of 4
    slewisslewis Posts: 2,080member
    Null.
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