Mac OS X 10.5.3 moving along, on course with iPhone 2.0?

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
Apple continues to plug away at the next maintenance and service update to Mac OS X Leopard, which may be on track for a release around the same time as the company's iPhone software v2.0, according to one tipster.



People familiar with ongoing tests of Mac OS X 10.5.3 say a new build was released privately to developers on Wednesday carrying build number 9D32 and packing a half dozen more code corrections.



Among those improvements are tweaks to the performance of certain graphics drivers and fixes to parental controls, wireless certificates, and screen sharing, those people say. The latest additions bring the running total of fixes expected as part of the release to a staggering 220.



For the second time in as many weeks, Apple is also reported to have slightly expanded the focus area for developers by asking that they aggressively test Leopard's Spotlight search feature in addition to the 14 other core components listed alongside build 9D29 last Wednesday.



Again, the Mac maker lists no known issues with the 416MB update, as has been the case for several weeks.



While previous expectations would have software nearing a formal release by next week, a rumor sent to AppleInsider and other Apple news sites suggests that Apple may have placed Mac OS X 10.5.3 on a development course similar to iPhone Software v2.0, which is due at the end of June.



The unconfirmed tip goes on assert that the two pieces of software would be released within a week of each other and also include some contingencies on .Mac, which would reportedly be offered at a discount early adopters of the company's upcoming 3G iPhone. Again, the tip is unconfirmed.



Meanwhile, Apple is simultaneously working on Mac OS X 10.5.3 Server, which upon last check had reach build 9D28. The release currently bundles just over four dozen fixes and maintains a core focus area of 20 components.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 47
    straskstrask Posts: 107member
    In so many ways, Leopard is just a big mess. Talking with a senior support person at Apple, I gather that some folks have few or no problems at all and some systems are simply plagued by bugs. My computer falls into the latter category.



    What I wonder is, with problems at this level, can't some of these fixes be delivered ahead of the major release? Or can't 10.5.3 be broken into two releases so those of us who have not experienced this kind of buggy behavior with our Macs since the dawn of OSX can have a little relief?
  • Reply 2 of 47
    pg4gpg4g Posts: 383member
    I'd say they could do so but there are complications. Each OS upgrade would need to be tested separately, delaying when the full build could come out. This is because they have to create 10.5.3 (the first installment you suggested), and then test it separately, and then build the 10.5.4 on top of that build instead of building them together and testing them together.



    That, and as it is being written as an update, they are easier to integrate all known bugs together, to avoid coding errors (the changes can both be applied to 10.5.2 instead of changing 10.5.2 to 10.5.3 and then 10.5.4 changing that code again)





    Basically, change the code as rarely as possible that way each bug fix and change can work off the same platform and cutdown production time.
  • Reply 3 of 47
    naphtalinaphtali Posts: 13member
    I think I'd very much prefer that they tested everything properly before rolling out the updates - there have been some nasty updates leading to data loss, Airport problems etc. After one updater irreversibly hosed Airport on my older Mac, I'm still hesitant to install any of the recent Airport updates.



    Piecemeal updates can also intimidating and annoying - e.g. Windows XP fresh install seeing 89+ updates (before the service packs), Office 2004 requiring 11+ individual updaters. (Not picking on Microsoft; these are just issues that come to mind)





    Also, I was thinking - what if the new .Mac service was offered free with every iPhone?
  • Reply 4 of 47
    pg4gpg4g Posts: 383member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by naphtali View Post


    I think I'd very much prefer that they tested everything properly before rolling out the updates - there have been some nasty updates leading to data loss, Airport problems etc. After one updater irreversibly hosed Airport on my older Mac, I'm still hesitant to install any of the recent Airport updates.



    Piecemeal updates can also intimidating and annoying - e.g. Windows XP fresh install seeing 89+ updates (before the service packs), Office 2004 requiring 11+ individual updaters. (Not picking on Microsoft; these are just issues that come to mind)





    Also, I was thinking - what if the new .Mac service was offered free with every iPhone?







    I doubt they would do it for free, but a major subsidy, yeah. More integration with .mac offered free would be a tempting idea for apple. Get people onto iPhone, and then offer them a good feature really subsidized, and then that feature works best on macs. Makes sense to do it, tempt people to macs



    Piecemeal updating realy doesn't work. The less updates the better.



    Its like slowly renovating a house and adding on levels, and building out, until the top is bigger than the bottom. It gets structurally unsound. Some bugs are hidden by other bugs, and so if they wipe out a bug, it may expose 10 more bugs. Better to deal with them all together than doing it separately.



    Apple seems to plan one update to the OS per quarter or so, for the first year and then slightly slower from then on. They stick to a plan!



    That and people have winged so much about 10.5.2 so much it seems 10.5.3 is being tested far more completely. We barely got word of 10.5.2 before its release, as it was so close to 10.5.1.
  • Reply 5 of 47
    crebcreb Posts: 276member
    Leopard has become a bit of a juggernaut as Apple tries to encompass its entire business model into its OS. There are a lot of balls in the air...let's hope they stay there.
  • Reply 6 of 47
    eaieai Posts: 417member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PG4G View Post


    We barely got word of 10.5.2 before its release, as it was so close to 10.5.1.



    10.5.2 Came out almost 3 months are 10.5.1 and we had endless coverage here of it...



    http://www.appleinsider.com/topics/Mac_OS_X_10.5.2.html
  • Reply 7 of 47
    pg4gpg4g Posts: 383member
    Oh, sorry, I was not aware of it... I upgraded a little later.
  • Reply 8 of 47
    echosonicechosonic Posts: 445member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by naphtali View Post


    I think I'd very much prefer that they tested everything properly before rolling out the updates - there have been some nasty updates leading to data loss, Airport problems etc. After one updater irreversibly hosed Airport on my older Mac, I'm still hesitant to install any of the recent Airport updates.



    Piecemeal updates can also intimidating and annoying - e.g. Windows XP fresh install seeing 89+ updates (before the service packs), Office 2004 requiring 11+ individual updaters. (Not picking on Microsoft; these are just issues that come to mind)





    Also, I was thinking - what if the new .Mac service was offered free with every iPhone?



    I would agree. Usually Apple hits it pretty hard on the head after the x.3 update anyway, its just their modus operandi.



    By 10.3.4 and 10.4.4 the lab where I work was confident enough in OSX that we were able to image a single Mac Hard disk and roll it out to over 20 different mac machines without issue, including mac book pros, imacs, etc...



    That says a LOT for Apple, I think, because you sure as hell could not image a single windows computer and then re-image that drive on any old windows machine and even expect it to boot, necessarily.
  • Reply 9 of 47
    zinfellazinfella Posts: 874member
    Some Leopard issues only affect small segments of people, but if you're one of them it doesn't really matter who else is plagued.
  • Reply 10 of 47
    dr_lhadr_lha Posts: 236member
    Would be nice to get this rolled out to Servers at least, the inability of the current Leopard Server to serve files over AFP for more than a few hours without the AFP server needing to be restarted has to be one of the bigger Apple bugs I've experienced recently.



    On the desktop Leopard is pretty decent IMHO, but I don't have any WiFi issues (actually Leopard cured my WiFi issues on an Intel Mac mini).



    EDIT: Agree with the poster above, the 10.x.3 release is usually the point at which upgrading becomes a no-brainer. It was certainly true with Panter and Tiger (a lot of people have forgotten, or didn't experience, how terrible Tiger was in the 10.4 - 10.4.2 iterations).
  • Reply 11 of 47
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,282member
    For those of you that follow Apple and BSD kernel issues I have to wonder if they will have fixed that 25 year old kernel bug in BSD? It is actually impressive that the bug has stayed around as long as it has given how simple it was. If Apple fixes this it will be a good sign that they are keeping core kernel issues under control in a timely manner.



    Dave
  • Reply 12 of 47
    pg4gpg4g Posts: 383member
    I didn't know of this issue.



    Send an email off to them, and tell them about it.
  • Reply 13 of 47
    zinfellazinfella Posts: 874member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PG4G View Post


    I didn't know of this issue.



    Send an email off to them, and tell them about it.



    Don't bother, it's been fixed. It was largely affecting Windows file sharing, according to my source, thus fixing it wasn't a high priority.
  • Reply 14 of 47
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CREB View Post


    There are a lot of balls in the air...let's hope they stay there.



    TWSS ;-)
  • Reply 15 of 47
    dagamer34dagamer34 Posts: 494member
    How about syncing NOTES FFS!
  • Reply 16 of 47
    daylightdaylight Posts: 10member
    one the of the main things that keeps bugging me with Mac OS 10.5.2 is the bloody wireless certificates.. i'd have to switch locations acouple of times as well as turning airport on and off a couple of times before it would let me log in at my university network. and despite the fact that i've accepted saved the certificate at my Uni. it keeps on asking me for the password each time it lets me connect.



    this happens everytime i put the laptop to sleep "closing the lid even for a second" and the waking up. i just lose the connection and takes acouple of minutes trying to get it to connect, for it to work.



    it gets embarrassing at times when you're showing your friends your latest macbook pro laptop and it can't do what their old windows laptop can do without a sweat.



    hope they bloody fix this soon.

    that and the screen dimming problem.



    for ref. i have a MacBook Pro 2.5GHz the last rev.
  • Reply 17 of 47
    macfandavemacfandave Posts: 603member
    Maybe I am alone here, but does Spotlight under Leopard suck compared to the Tiger implementation?



    I always found things more accurately with Tiger and the Find... option in the Finder was better overall.



    Is it just me?
  • Reply 18 of 47
    ktappektappe Posts: 732member
    I have 98 new iMacs I cannot deploy because we need the AD fixes in 10.5.3 for the iMacs to be able to connect to our infrastructure. Every 10.5.3 delay delays our deployment and gets me in even more hot water with my employer because it looks like it's me who's not getting his job done. Apple, we need 10.5.3. Please do not keep bloating it up--release what you have and save the rest for 10.5.4. PLEASE.
  • Reply 19 of 47
    retiariusretiarius Posts: 142member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


    For those of you that follow Apple and BSD kernel issues I have to wonder if they will have fixed that 25 year old kernel bug in BSD? It is actually impressive that the bug has stayed around as long as it has given how simple it was. If Apple fixes this it will be a good sign that they are keeping core kernel issues under control in a timely manner.



    Dave



    I'll date myself by saying I have code in several BSD/GNU Unix utilities still sitting around

    /usr/bin on all shipping Macs -- one is 25 years old, one is 24, and one is 18 (though derived

    from a 22-year-old effort.) It's amazing that anyone would still use this stuff, let alone want to

    fix known bugs therein. Nonetheless, it was big fun to show my much younger kids

    my name in the copyright credits on every iPhone/iPod touch and AppleTV though!



    Because non-kernel code is rather easier to workaround/replace, I'd have to do some

    archaeology to see if my bugs still exist, especially one nasty in that quarter-century old

    hack which shall remain nameless right now. When I worked at another systems house

    (Sun Microsystems), I knew it still remained, but no-one ever reported it, and I guess

    they didn't pay me enough to fix it! I'm bad, but the original code was free ...
  • Reply 20 of 47
    zinfellazinfella Posts: 874member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DayLight View Post


    one the of the main things that keeps bugging me with Mac OS 10.5.2 is the bloody wireless certificates.. i'd have to switch locations acouple of times as well as turning airport on and off a couple of times before it would let me log in at my university network. and despite the fact that i've accepted saved the certificate at my Uni. it keeps on asking me for the password each time it lets me connect.



    this happens everytime i put the laptop to sleep "closing the lid even for a second" and the waking up. i just lose the connection and takes acouple of minutes trying to get it to connect, for it to work.



    it gets embarrassing at times when you're showing your friends your latest macbook pro laptop and it can't do what their old windows laptop can do without a sweat.



    hope they bloody fix this soon.

    that and the screen dimming problem.



    for ref. i have a MacBook Pro 2.5GHz the last rev.



    I have, use, and like, 1Password, a great piece of software. It will, if you like, generate fabulous passwords, or you can use your own. Then it remembers the passwords to every place that needs them. It also has a digital wallet, where you can fill in credit card info, and it will then use that info whenever you like. It puts an icon between the address window and the window for adding a bookmark. When you click on it, then it offers various services



    One of the best things it does is for online forms. Put your cursor in the first box, hold down control-option-command-1, and all of the boxes are filled in with your info.
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