Son wants me to install WOW 10 day trial. Any issues with this?

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
My son wants me to install World of Warcraft's 10 day free trial on my MBP. I don't mind doing this but am concerned about the install of this program. Does it install files all over the HD or is it one of those drag and drop apps?



And other issues I should be concerned about regarding this program?



Thanks to all who answer.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 13
    talksense101talksense101 Posts: 1,737member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sc_markt View Post


    My son wants me to install World of Warcraft's 10 day free trial on my MBP. I don't mind doing this but am concerned about the install of this program. Does it install files all over the HD or is it one of those drag and drop apps?



    And other issues I should be concerned about regarding this program?



    Thanks to all who answer.



    Other than getting hooked on to the game and wasting several months of your lifetime on it, no issues with WoW. World of Warcraft is pretty good, even on Windows. It plays by the rules and doesn't screw your machine over.
  • Reply 2 of 13
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,734member
    You beat me to it. I was going to say, have your son play outside and get some fresh air instead.
  • Reply 3 of 13
    mr_zebramr_zebra Posts: 85member
    I think he was more looking for tech advice than parenting advice.



    However, I installed it and started playing it but realised how addictive it was becoming, and I don't have an addictive personality (well, unless you count wine and the occasional glass of Baileys) so I uninstalled it. But Talksense is right - it plays by the rules. Go ahead! Give it a go - but be careful of how much time is spent on it.
  • Reply 4 of 13
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,734member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mr_zebra View Post


    I think he was more looking for tech advice than parenting advice.



    However, I installed it and started playing it but realised how addictive it was becoming, and I don't have an addictive personality (well, unless you count wine and the occasional glass of Baileys) so I uninstalled it. But Talksense is right - it plays by the rules. Go ahead! Give it a go - but be careful of how much time is spent on it.



    The only game that really held my interest was Marathon, and that was only because we had it networked at our office and had hours long competitions (this was years ago).
  • Reply 5 of 13
    sc_marktsc_markt Posts: 1,393member
    Thanks everybody who answered. I will install it as it's only a 10 day trial. After this time is up, I'll delete it.



    And I agree with those who warned about getting addicted to this game. My son has a friend who is addicted to it. I haven't see this kid in over a year and both of my sons say he spends every single second playing WOW.







    Last question: Are there any online concerns with WOW that I should be aware of?
  • Reply 6 of 13
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    The only game that really held my interest was Marathon, and that was only because we had it networked at our office and had hours long competitions (this was years ago).



    Marathon? That was a long time ago. Before my time, but it's offpsring (Halo) still holds my interest





    With regards to any online concerns, I assume you mean any issues like online predators and such? From what I know, the WoW community is pretty safe, or as safe as anything online can be.



    Once again, I feel the need to stress the importance of not becoming addicted to that game. I learned my lesson to keep some distance from Blizzard (the game developer) games after having had a period of moderate addiction to both Diablo 2 and Warcraft 3.
  • Reply 7 of 13
    sc_marktsc_markt Posts: 1,393member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Shadow Slayer 26 View Post


    Marathon? That was a long time ago. Before my time, but it's offpsring (Halo) still holds my interest





    With regards to any online concerns, I assume you mean any issues like online predators and such? From what I know, the WoW community is pretty safe, or as safe as anything online can be.



    Once again, I feel the need to stress the importance of not becoming addicted to that game. I learned my lesson to keep some distance from Blizzard (the game developer) games after having had a period of moderate addiction to both Diablo 2 and Warcraft 3.



    Thanks Shadow Slayer 26.
  • Reply 8 of 13
    vineavinea Posts: 5,585member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Shadow Slayer 26 View Post


    Once again, I feel the need to stress the importance of not becoming addicted to that game. I learned my lesson to keep some distance from Blizzard (the game developer) games after having had a period of moderate addiction to both Diablo 2 and Warcraft 3.



    Eh...there ARE casual players of the game. There are 10M or more subscribers and they aren't all sinking massive time into WoW. It's only as addicting as you want it to be or as a parent you let it be.



    My cousin is "addicted" but still manages to get good grades, play football (junior varsity) and so forth. He does that instead of other video games or TV probably to excess but then again...most teens watch too much TV or play XBox/PS3/DS/PSP/etc too much.



    If he's home at 10pm raiding on a Friday night on WoW, that's likely a heck of a safer than out partying with his football buds.



    The nice thing is that I would have no problems with locking WoW out for low grades or whatever. I would be more hesitant in stopping football since physical activity is something I prefer my kids do.



    About the only thing I would do is to actually play with my kids in any online medium. Especially if they were younger.



    Besides, MMOs are a passing thing for most kids. In some respects it's better to get it out of their systems (or at least find out they will get seriously addicted) while you can keep an eye on them while living at home rather than they play in college unsupervised and trash their freshman year...
  • Reply 9 of 13
    s.metcalfs.metcalf Posts: 872member
    Diablo 2 was the crack of games. I don't know if I enjoyed it but I couldn't stop playing!



    Maybe he should check out www.lotro.com. No Mac version but if you have Bootcamp it runs acceptably I've read.
  • Reply 10 of 13
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by vinea View Post


    Eh...there ARE casual players of the game. There are 10M or more subscribers and they aren't all sinking massive time into WoW. It's only as addicting as you want it to be or as a parent you let it be.



    My cousin is "addicted" but still manages to get good grades, play football (junior varsity) and so forth. He does that instead of other video games or TV probably to excess but then again...most teens watch too much TV or play XBox/PS3/DS/PSP/etc too much.



    If he's home at 10pm raiding on a Friday night on WoW, that's likely a heck of a safer than out partying with his football buds.



    The nice thing is that I would have no problems with locking WoW out for low grades or whatever. I would be more hesitant in stopping football since physical activity is something I prefer my kids do.



    About the only thing I would do is to actually play with my kids in any online medium. Especially if they were younger.



    Besides, MMOs are a passing thing for most kids. In some respects it's better to get it out of their systems (or at least find out they will get seriously addicted) while you can keep an eye on them while living at home rather than they play in college unsupervised and trash their freshman year...



    I can agree with much of that, except for how if he's home at 10pm raiding. You said how in some respects it's better to let them play some now while you can supervise them, instead of later (college) when they are unsupervised. The same goes for hanging out/partying/whatever else your cousin might do with his football buds. By getting that 'out of his system' in highschool, he may be less prone to being a heavy partier in college.



    Also I can easily understand how someone can be 'addicted' to a game, yet still get good grades and so on. When I was playing Diablo 2 I would go to school, practice, finish up my homework as quickly as possible and spend the rest of the night playing Diablo.



    Nowadays, I've swapped Diablo out with many other forms of entertainment, the leading one being reading.





    Finally, at "s.metcalf":

    "Diablo 2 was the crack of games. I don't know if I enjoyed it but I couldn't stop playing!"



    Isn't that the joy of Diablo? Realizing you don't even want to be playing much but can't help but work hard for that windforce bow for your zon, or Grandfather sword for your barb? :P
  • Reply 11 of 13
    techgirltechgirl Posts: 21member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sc_markt View Post




    Last question: Are there any online concerns with WOW that I should be aware of?





    Not really....I don't know how old your son is, but I assume old enough to not be bothered/overly impacted by some cartoon violence. It is an MMO, so he will have the opportunity to talk with others in-game. Basic safety practices (don't give out name or personal info) is important as with any chat room. The game is pretty tame in comparison to most these days; the most "offensive" aspect I suppose would be all the quests where you are sent to retrieve someone's head/hand or the like. As long as reasonable time constraints are imposed, it is a great game. Like many wonderful things it is easy to overindulge, but small amounts can be satisfying as well.
  • Reply 12 of 13
    toymakertoymaker Posts: 30member
    Seems to be a few world of warcrack addicts (or ex-addicts) among us, and I'm no different. I'm basically repeating what others have said, but as far as messing with your system, it's completely separate as far as I can tell, as it's confined to it's own folder in the applications folder. You can even grab the WoW folder from one mac, dump it into the Apps folder on another mac, and it'll work happily without any noticeable difference.



    As for the "Online Concerns", it's as safe as you make it. As was said before, never give out personal details, don't share accounts, etc, etc. And if anyone ever does step out of line, that other player can always be reported to an administrator for such conduct.



    Yet again, it's a case of "Parents should be responsible for protecting their kids" vs. "The authors/writers/whatever should block it from happening".
  • Reply 13 of 13
    ROFL Casual WoW players.... Vinea would you like to buy a clue for .25 ?



    There is really no such thing as a casual player in this virtual world.



    I hope this guy gets his kid the 10 day trial (ultimate marketing tool?). When he goes to uninstall it, his kid will turn on him like a heroin addict at a morphine clinic... and I hope he comes back here to tell us about it....
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