Ex PC user - really ... no antivirus needed?

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
Ive been looking through the net and forums and seems not many mac uses have antivirus software?

Anyone using iAntivirus free addition or recomendation on others? The only other free one I found was ClamXav, although mixed reviews.

thanks

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 17
    zoolookzoolook Posts: 657member
    There is no real need for anti-virus software on the Mac. There are arguments that suggest you could have it to ensure you don't 'pass on' viruses to PCs on your network, but in reality this should not really be an issue or even happen.



    I would not bother. However if you run Windows in BootCamp or a Virtual Machine, you should protect it with AntiVirus, the same as you would with any ordinary PC.
  • Reply 2 of 17
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Zoolook View Post


    There is no real need for anti-virus software on the Mac. There are arguments that suggest you could have it to ensure you don't 'pass on' viruses to PCs on your network, but in reality this should not really be an issue or even happen.



    I would not bother. However if you run Windows in BootCamp or a Virtual Machine, you should protect it with AntiVirus, the same as you would with any ordinary PC.



    Thanks!
  • Reply 3 of 17
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,219member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Zoolook View Post


    ... but in reality this should not really be an issue or even happen.



    ...



    In reality, if you receive an infected file from a Windows user, then you will pass that infection on if you share the file with other Windows users.
  • Reply 4 of 17
    zoolookzoolook Posts: 657member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mr. Me View Post


    In reality, if you receive an infected file from a Windows user, then you will pass that infection on if you share the file with other Windows users.



    Sure, but how likely are VBS or EXE files going to be used and shared by Mac users? The biggest issue is the user passing on an email or file containing a virus, without knowing it.
  • Reply 5 of 17
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,219member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Zoolook View Post


    Sure, but how likely are VBS or EXE files going to be used and shared by Mac users? The biggest issue is the user passing on an email or file containing a virus, without knowing it.



    You are not making sense. The problem occurs when you pass-on an infected file to a Windows user. Mac users rarely pass .exe files of any kind to anyone. However, those of us who have jobs often pass-on Office documents to our colleagues. Mac users do not create malicious VBS scripts. However, we can most certainly pass-on the ones that we receive.
  • Reply 6 of 17
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mr. Me View Post


    You are not making sense. The problem occurs when you pass-on an infected file to a Windows user. Mac users rarely pass .exe files of any kind to anyone.



    However, those of us who have jobs often pass-on Office documents to our colleagues. Mac users do not create malicious VBS scripts. However, we can most certainly pass-on the ones that we receive.



    er... quite, I thought that's what I said.
  • Reply 7 of 17
    Use ClamAv to scan your machine once in a while. If you find viruses on your machine, invest in an antivirus to save Windows users.
  • Reply 8 of 17
    gongon Posts: 2,437member
    Antivirus is not necessary on OS X.



    For seasoned users who know better than to install unreputable software or use Microsoft apps, antivirus is not even necessary on Windows.
  • Reply 9 of 17
    If you use your Mac in a work-environment, then get anti-virus, so your costumers wont get virus' from you.



    If you dont, save the money. Not worth it, at all.
  • Reply 10 of 17
    backtomacbacktomac Posts: 4,579member
    In the FWIW department.



    I have clam av and have used it for about 6 months to do random AV search and destroy.



    I have never had it discover a virus.



    Since clam av is free it wasn't a waste of money but if I would have purchased AV software.....
  • Reply 11 of 17
    kickahakickaha Posts: 8,760member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mr. Me View Post


    You are not making sense. The problem occurs when you pass-on an infected file to a Windows user. Mac users rarely pass .exe files of any kind to anyone. However, those of us who have jobs often pass-on Office documents to our colleagues. Mac users do not create malicious VBS scripts. However, we can most certainly pass-on the ones that we receive.



    Certainly. But I'm not going to walk around town with a facemask on even when I'm not sick, just because someone else didn't get their flu shots.



    If a Windows user is intent on keeping their system clean, they can be the one to ensure that. I'm not going to destabilize my system (and Norton, etc historically have been *horrible* for making Macs flaky as hell), just so some one who chose an insecure system can sleep well. I work in a *staunchly* Windows office environment, and I firmly believe in letting users be responsible for their own security.



    I run clamav every couple of months, just for kicks, and it has never, not once, found anything. IMO, that's the extent most Mac users should have to go to. If you are in a unique situation, passing infected Office documents around, then sure, your needs will be different... but it might be better to find patient zero and inoculate them.
  • Reply 12 of 17
    I have been a Macintosh user for 18 years now, since the middle of 1990. During this time, I have worked on a Mac Plus, Mac SE, Mac LC III, Mac G3 and Mac G4. In all of this time, I have only been infected by a virus one time, (back in the Classic days), and this was due to my own fault.



    I have used Norton Antivirus, Virex, MacScan, VirusBarrier and ClamXav. I continue to use the latter to scan emails, and certain download locations on my hard drives and partitions.



    Again, never, ever have I been infected, except for that one solitary occasion many years ago.



    If one uses wisdom, and works exclusively in a Macintosh environment, particularly in an OSX environment, I would have to agree that purchasing antivirus software is a waste of money. ClamXav is free, and has daily automatic virus definition updates, as well as program updates. It's worked fine for my needs.



    If, however, you do collaborate with Windows users in any way, then I would have to agree that for their sakes, you might want to consider installing antivirus software; although they should be responsible for protecting themselves, as others here have duly noted.
  • Reply 13 of 17
    I use ClamXav to scan any downloads, that's about it
  • Reply 14 of 17
    I used to use iAntivirus from PC Tools. If you really want to feel "secure", then use it. But I would use Clam X AV. Both are free, but I prefer ClamXAV.
  • Reply 15 of 17
    sequitursequitur Posts: 1,901member
    I ran ClamXav recently, and it found found an "infected" file. I doubt that the file was actually infected; it did have an anomaly in it though.

    Whether it is or not is beside the point. I'd like to know what to do with a file that has been put into quarantine by ClamXav. Can I put it into trash and then empty the trash? I assume the file is still on my HDD and is just beheaded so to speak. Could it still do damage when trashed? OR should I just keep it in quarantine forever?

    Is there a more permanent way to get rid of a single file, so that it isn't just beheaded?
  • Reply 16 of 17
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,219member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sequitur View Post


    .... Could it still do damage when trashed? OR should I just keep it in quarantine forever? ...



    Trashed MacOS X applications cannot be launched. Trashed MacOS X documents cannot be opened. Therefore, trashed MacOS X items can't damage your system. That said, there are no MacOS X viruses. What you have is likely an anomalously constructed file or a Windows virus. Neither can hurt anything on your Mac.
  • Reply 17 of 17
    sequitursequitur Posts: 1,901member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mr. Me View Post


    Trashed MacOS X applications cannot be launched. Trashed MacOS X documents cannot be opened. Therefore, trashed MacOS X items can't damage your system. That said, there are no MacOS X viruses. What you have is likely an anomalously constructed file or a Windows virus. Neither can hurt anything on your Mac.



    Thanks, Mr. Me. Your input is much appreciated.
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