I did something boneheaded

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
After doing a global file close in list mode (command + left arrow) on my Apps directory, I accidentally doublclicked all the highlighted apps. They all opened simultaneously, or tried to (I only have a gig of ram in my G4 Ibook running 10.3.9). After about an hour or so most of them had opened, freeing up enough CPU power to allow be to begin force quitting, and eventaully just command + Q'ing. The system never freezed up, and I was able to shut down and restart.



However, now Firefox is doing some strange stuff, like quitting in the middle of a music stream (while a check with network utility shows my connection is active). If it was happening with a single website I'm blame the site, but it's not. Could this be an indication of bigger problems connected with this whole fiasco?

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 6
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,219member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by evaness View Post


    ...Could this be an indication of bigger problems connected with this whole fiasco?



    Based on the information that you gave, no.
  • Reply 2 of 6
    shadowshadow Posts: 373member
    Try the following, quitting before and restarting after each step in section A, until the problem goes away:



    A.

    1. Go to the ~/Library/Caches and delete the Firefox folder ( ~ stands for your home directory).

    2. Re-download and replace Firefox.

    3. From Firefox->:Preferences->Security, View certificates button -> backup all certificates.

    4. Go to the ~/Library/Application support and move the folders Firefox and Mozilla away.

    5. Go to the ~/Library/ and move the Mozilla folder away.

    6. Go to the ~/Library/Preferences and move org.mozilla.firefox.plist away.

    7. Go to the /Library (your root volume) and move the folder Mozilla away.



    B.

    1. If the problem goes away after specific step, try too move back the items moved away before that.

    2. Restore the certificates if needed and delete the backup file.
  • Reply 3 of 6
    Thanks, Shadow. I only had to try step 1 and performance with Firefox improved to normal. The only thing strange was that upon rebooting it took extra long for the system to restart, there was a hang-up before the desktop was completely restored (only the icons--for the battery, bluetooth, airport, etc on the right side appeared at first, I had to wait about 45 seconds for the rest). I would have thought the OS would have restored the Firefox cache--assuming this was the cause-- when I reopened the program, not upon the 1st restart after cache deletion.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by shadow View Post


    Try the following, quitting before and restarting after each step in section A, until the problem goes away:



    A.

    1. Go to the ~/Library/Caches and delete the Firefox folder ( ~ stands for your home directory).

    2. Re-download and replace Firefox.

    3. From Firefox->:Preferences->Security, View certificates button -> backup all certificates.

    4. Go to the ~/Library/Application support and move the folders Firefox and Mozilla away.

    5. Go to the ~/Library/ and move the Mozilla folder away.

    6. Go to the ~/Library/Preferences and move org.mozilla.firefox.plist away.

    7. Go to the /Library (your root volume) and move the folder Mozilla away.



    B.

    1. If the problem goes away after specific step, try too move back the items moved away before that.

    2. Restore the certificates if needed and delete the backup file.



  • Reply 4 of 6
    I'm also experiencing really slow performance with Thunderbird. Does this mean I may have to go through a similar process with every piece of SW that opened during this fiasco? And would the 1st step be deleting the preference folder in the SW that doesn't have a cache folder?



    Also, is there any reason I couldn't simply upgrade programs like Firefox or Thunderbird, instead of re-downloading and re-installing?
  • Reply 5 of 6
    shadowshadow Posts: 373member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by evaness View Post


    I'm also experiencing really slow performance with Thunderbird. Does this mean I may have to go through a similar process with every piece of SW that opened during this fiasco?



    I believe you will not need to, otherwise Yes. There are some utilities like OnyX which can help. But be careful and make sure you download an App version compatible with your OS version.



    Quote:

    And would the 1st step be deleting the preference folder in the SW that doesn't have a cache folder?



    Yes. Most programs have a preferences file only (step 6).



    Quote:

    Also, is there any reason I couldn't simply upgrade programs like Firefox or Thunderbird, instead of re-downloading and re-installing?



    No.
  • Reply 6 of 6
    Thanks!





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by shadow View Post


    I believe you will not need to, otherwise Yes. There are some utilities like OnyX which can help. But be careful and make sure you download an App version compatible with your OS version.





    Yes. Most programs have a preferences file only (step 6).





    No.



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