OS X Touch 1.0

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
Coming as soon as the OS is completely Cocoa. That's why we haven't seen a Touch Pro yet. Snow Leopard is the beginning of the middle of the end for desktop computing.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 15
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,354member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by m2002brian View Post


    Coming as soon as the OS is completely Cocoa. That's why we haven't seen a Touch Pro yet. Snow Leopard is the beginning of the middle of the end for desktop computing.



    Desktop computing will remain alive and well for a long time.
  • Reply 2 of 15
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,503member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by m2002brian View Post


    Coming as soon as the OS is completely Cocoa. That's why we haven't seen a Touch Pro yet. Snow Leopard is the beginning of the middle of the end for desktop computing.



    Let me know how the 24th Century is doing.
  • Reply 3 of 15
    dfilerdfiler Posts: 3,420member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by m2002brian View Post


    Coming as soon as the OS is completely Cocoa. That's why we haven't seen a Touch Pro yet. Snow Leopard is the beginning of the middle of the end for desktop computing.



    A nit to pick...



    OS X will never be completely Cocoa. Not even close. Perhaps the GUI will eventually lose all the user interaction code that is non-Cocoa. But even then, the vast majority of OS X will have absolutely nothing to do with Cocoa.



    Also desktop computing isn't ending. Instead, other types of computing are gaining popularity. Desktop computing isn't disappearing, it is merely getting some company.
  • Reply 4 of 15
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dfiler View Post




    Also desktop computing isn't ending. Instead, other types of computing are gaining popularity. Desktop computing isn't disappearing, it is merely getting some company.



    Desktop sales have declined with the rise in portable sales.
  • Reply 5 of 15
    dfilerdfiler Posts: 3,420member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacWhore View Post


    Desktop sales have declined with the rise in portable sales.



    I'm not sure if you were trying to contradict my assertion or add to that assertion.



    Certainly some people who used to buy desktops, now buy laptops. But that's a far cry from desktop computing disappearing.
  • Reply 6 of 15
    kim kap solkim kap sol Posts: 2,987member
    For desktop computing to disappear the following would have to happen to notebook/mobile computers:



    - Battery life greater than 36 hours

    - Instant charge battery (apparently this could be coming soon)

    - Display greater than 17" (this could eventually achieved holographically? I'm sure no one wants to walk around with a 24" laptop)

    - Massive storage space (something that matches at least half the storage space of a Mac Pro)

    - Stellar performance

    - Excellent sound system



    As you can see, desktop computing won't disappear for the next 50 years.



    I use my desktop computer as a hub to stream music, video, play old game console classics, play modern games, watch TV, watch movies. Losing all this would be a technological and well-being regression. While most of this stuff can be done from a mobile computer, the experience is not at all the same.



    People that think the iPhone (or small devices similar to) is the only future of computing are wrong, there is a lot of software that simply isn't suited for small devices. Unless new input devices are created for the portable devices to meet the needs of these complex applications, there will always be a need for a powerful desktop computer that can provide any input devices.
  • Reply 7 of 15
    dfilerdfiler Posts: 3,420member
    Add ergonomics to that list as well. A dedicated computing workstation will always be preferable to those with repetative strain, motor-control, or sight limitations.



    This isn't to say there's no place of the "OS X Touch 1.0". Just that it's place is amidst a variety of other computing form factors.
  • Reply 8 of 15
    kim kap solkim kap sol Posts: 2,987member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dfiler View Post


    Add ergonomics to that list as well. A dedicated computing workstation will always be preferable to those with repetative strain, motor-control, or sight limitations.



    This isn't to say there's no place of the "OS X Touch 1.0". Just that it's place is amidst a variety of other computing form factors.



    Exactly.



    One form factor isn't going to be the end of the other form factors. I love my iPod touch very much for what I use it for: contacts, appointments, grocery lists, notes, quick e-mail access, light web surfing, and casual gaming. For these things, the iPod touch and iPhone make perfect sense.



    But if I'm going to be writing a letter or a paper/essay, or compositing an image, or some heavier web browsing, or playing a complex game, or watching a movie, the desktop computer will definitely be better for the reason dfiler pointed out: ergonomics.



    I don't think anyone could say that they'd rather be typing stuff, editing/creating images, web surfing for hours, or playing something other than a casual game or watching a 2 hour long movie on an iPhone rather than on a desktop or even a notebook computer.



    There's definitely a place for all the form factors that exist currently.
  • Reply 9 of 15
    utisnum1utisnum1 Posts: 138member
    Desktops are going to be around for a long time. Until something new come around that requires no ports, no connection and no power from an outlet and can be portable enough to fold out to have a holographic screen, i doubt we will see the end of desktop computing.
  • Reply 10 of 15
    Well I should have spoke more clearly. Yes desktop computers will be around for a while. On the other hand actual desktop computing is declining. As some have even said on this very thread, they use their desktop as a server. I wouldn't consider running a server desktop computing. I would call using your laptop in place of a tower, desktop computing. The point I'm getting at, the smaller these computers get, more and more people will be getting off their ass, leaving the old desk cubical behind and going to the park, the coffee shop, their couch. Obviously we're spoiled. My laptop (3yrs old Macbook Core Due) is for more powerful than the PC our accountant uses, yet she uses a desktop. My iPod has enough power to run an accounting program.

    Honestly, is anybody doing these days that would REQUIRE a desktop tower? I sit here typing this on a 2.7 GHz PowerPC G5 w/ 8 GB DDR SDRAM, MAIN computer at Sauk Centre Web Printing, running Leopard 10.5.6.

    This computer runs Preps 5, Acrobat 7.0, Prinergy Virtual Proofing, Prinergy Evo, Distiller 7.0, Safari, Firefox, and Mail. At the same time, zero problem. But guess what We only use 2 usb ports, zero Firewire, 1 Ethernet, 2 monitors. What one doesn't understand is, a Macbook Pro can do all this, and it's portable, requires less energy, and takes up less space. Added bonus, battery backup in case of power failure on the job. And if the boss would listen to me, he could bring it home, DL the files off the FTP site, process them, and have them finished. All without having to COME TO WORK to use the computer at 4am so files are ready at 6am to print via Goss Community Web Offset.
  • Reply 11 of 15
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,503member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by m2002brian View Post


    Well I should have spoke more clearly. Yes desktop computers will be around for a while. On the other hand actual desktop computing is declining. As some have even said on this very thread, they use their desktop as a server. I wouldn't consider running a server desktop computing. I would call using your laptop in place of a tower, desktop computing. The point I'm getting at, the smaller these computers get, more and more people will be getting off their ass, leaving the old desk cubical behind and going to the park, the coffee shop, their couch. Obviously we're spoiled. My laptop (3yrs old Macbook Core Due) is for more powerful than the PC our accountant uses, yet she uses a desktop. My iPod has enough power to run an accounting program.

    Honestly, is anybody doing these days that would REQUIRE a desktop tower? I sit here typing this on a 2.7 GHz PowerPC G5 w/ 8 GB DDR SDRAM, MAIN computer at Sauk Centre Web Printing, running Leopard 10.5.6.

    This computer runs Preps 5, Acrobat 7.0, Prinergy Virtual Proofing, Prinergy Evo, Distiller 7.0, Safari, Firefox, and Mail. At the same time, zero problem. But guess what We only use 2 usb ports, zero Firewire, 1 Ethernet, 2 monitors. What one doesn't understand is, a Macbook Pro can do all this, and it's portable, requires less energy, and takes up less space. Added bonus, battery backup in case of power failure on the job. And if the boss would listen to me, he could bring it home, DL the files off the FTP site, process them, and have them finished. All without having to COME TO WORK to use the computer at 4am so files are ready at 6am to print via Goss Community Web Offset.



    It's declining, relative to the growth of portable computing. The fact the install base continues to expand for desktop computing should give you pause to realize that arguing it's on the way out is false. Once portable reaches it's natural saturation level, it will begin to "decline" by your criteria.



    Working at a Kinko's/Sauk Centre Web Printing is a bad barometer for the market(s).
  • Reply 12 of 15
    dfilerdfiler Posts: 3,420member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post


    It's declining, relative to the growth of portable computing. The fact the install base continues to expand for desktop computing should give you pause to realize that arguing it's on the way out is false.



    Thanks! That's what I was trying to get at.



    Although it seems that some PC makers actually sold fewer desktops in the last year. I'd attribute that entirely to the recession and businesses tightening their belts, not because desktops are on the way out. College students, on the other hand, are likely to just buy a slower laptop than they had planned on rather than forgoing a computer entirely. So while the trend is toward desktops comprising a smaller percentage of the installed base, last year's data overstates the rate of change. When the economy picks up and businesses get back to their normal equipment upgrade cycle, the desktop market will pick back up a bit.



    I think smart phones (pocket computers) and tablets are headed down a similar path, but with a few differences. Some people can completely replace a desktop with a laptop and still complete the same tasks. However the same is not true for a tablet or pocket computer. Tasks involving significant data entry will be better suited to a computer with dedicated and full-size input devices and displays.



    Tablets make great inventory trackers, atlases, home automation controllers, home-theater remotes, and entertainment for subways and airplanes, etc. However, they completely suck for lots of other tasks. Even a cookbook would be better on a laptop. Tablets basically require the user to always hold the device in order for the display to be positioned properly for use. This only leaves one hand free for interacting with the device or performing the primary task at hand in the physical world.



    Try taking an engineer or accountant's desktop away from them... they'll go ballistic.



    Best thing I see arising from the iPhone and possibly an Apple tablet: Refinement of touch screen interfaces. In a few years, the touch screen interactions will have rapidly evolved and become seen as valuable additions to even desktop and laptop computers. I predict that touch screens will someday be standard on every computer display sold. Invest in SC Johnson now (the maker of Windex).
  • Reply 13 of 15
    kim kap solkim kap sol Posts: 2,987member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dfiler View Post


    I predict that touch screens will someday be standard on every computer display sold. Invest in SC Johnson now (the maker of Windex).



    Soooo, let's get this straight. You're predicting that touch screens will be soooo popular for desktop displays that people will be willing to put fingerprint marks all over them and put up with the hassle of having their arms extended to the screen for periods of time as well as cleaning the screen every once in awhile.



    I on the other hand, predict that holographic displays will come out before touch screen desktop displays ever become "standard".



    The desktop computer isn't limited in input devices like the mobile computer is. Touch input for mobile computer makes sense because the user probably doesn't want to carry a keyboard and mouse around with him -- it would defeat the mobility purpose. Desktop computers however have a myriad of input devices that are much more efficient than touch will ever be.



    The mouse and keyboard are currently the most efficient input devices for a great number of tasks on desktop computers. Even for tasks like drawing where the mouse isn't ideal, the pen tablet is still much more efficient than touch.



    For touch input to become a reality on desktop, it would have to become more efficient than other input devices. Even if Mac OS X became touch-friendly (with screen elements that are big enough to accomodate fat fingers), the mouse and keyboard would still trump touch as in input.
  • Reply 14 of 15
    dfilerdfiler Posts: 3,420member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kim kap sol View Post


    Soooo, let's get this straight. You're predicting that touch screens will be soooo popular for desktop displays that people will be willing to put fingerprint marks all over them and put up with the hassle of having their arms extended to the screen for periods of time as well as cleaning the screen every once in awhile.



    I on the other hand, predict that holographic displays will come out before touch screen desktop displays ever become "standard".



    Yes, I predict they'll be popular once they are cheap enough to make them a why-not feature on all displays.



    On the other-hand, I made no assertion about them replacing mice.



    Just because you have a toaster in your kitchen doesn't mean you stop using a stove.



    Everyone has a toaster and a stove nowadays because stoves are needed for all kinds of cooking and toasters are cheap. The same will be true with touch screens.
  • Reply 15 of 15
    kim kap solkim kap sol Posts: 2,987member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dfiler View Post


    Yes, I predict they'll be popular once they are cheap enough to make them a why-not feature on all displays.



    On the other-hand, I made no assertion about them replacing mice.



    Just because you have a toaster in your kitchen doesn't mean you stop using a stove.



    Everyone has a toaster and a stove nowadays because stoves are needed for all kinds of cooking and toasters are cheap. The same will be true with touch screens.



    Ok, you're probably right then. I'll concede that when touch screens become cheap enough to manufacture, they'll complement the current input devices.
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