Clouded Leopard

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
A good friend of mine that work for Apple in California says the next big OS release from Apple will come in 2011 and will be called Clouded Leopard. I don't have any further light on the subject and it has to be in EXTREMELY early stages but, it seems that we still have another form of Leopard to look forward to!

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 14
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,664member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by atom000bomb View Post


    A good friend of mine that work for Apple in California says the next big OS release from Apple will come in 2011 and will be called Clouded Leopard. I don't have any further light on the subject and it has to be in EXTREMELY early stages but, it seems that we still have another form of Leopard to look forward to!



    Interesting. Quick Google shows that



    1-- There actually is a species of cat called "clouded leopard"

    2-- Its closest relative is the Snow Leopard, and (didn't actually need Google for this)

    3-- It's a name that obviously alludes to the "cloud", which would be a natural evolution for OS X (more hooks to cloud based services, etc.)



    So I could actually see that as an internal designation, although it doesn't quite work for a consumer release (clouded isn't really and adjective you want associated with your OS), although "Cloud Leopard", a very recently discovered type of Leopard, might.
  • Reply 2 of 14
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,341member
    EVERYONE knows that 10.7 is going to be called



    OS X Mufasa. Jobs' is moonlighting with Disney ya know.
  • Reply 3 of 14
    Interesting observations addabox. I didn't even think about the fact that clouded leopard could in fact be a beginning to cloud computing on the Mac. I did connect the whole Leopard evolution thing though. I wonder also...was part of the influence for the name Snow Leopard because snow is light and all of the apps in Snow Leopard will be much lighter in size? Like snow? Maybe i'm reaching there...
  • Reply 4 of 14
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by addabox View Post


    Interesting. Quick Google shows that



    1-- There actually is a species of cat called "clouded leopard"

    2-- Its closest relative is the Snow Leopard, and (didn't actually need Google for this)

    3-- It's a name that obviously alludes to the "cloud", which would be a natural evolution for OS X (more hooks to cloud based services, etc.)



    So I could actually see that as an internal designation, although it doesn't quite work for a consumer release (clouded isn't really and adjective you want associated with your OS), although "Cloud Leopard", a very recently discovered type of Leopard, might.



    Since you brought these items to my attention I've actually been able to further confirm some details.



    1. This OS release will indeed have something to do with information being stored in the cloud

    2. It is a possibility that "Cloud Leopard" could be used instead of "Clouded Leopard"
  • Reply 5 of 14
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,544moderator
    It may not be the next version but rather a varient of the OS. Like you get OS X Server. You may get OS X Cloud. I don't think any OS that stores user information online would be very popular.
  • Reply 6 of 14
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,664member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


    It may not be the next version but rather a varient of the OS. Like you get OS X Server. You may get OS X Cloud. I don't think any OS that stores user information online would be very popular.



    Sure, but that doesn't mean Apple wouldn't build more seamless integration with their servers into the OS.



    They've sort of been dicking around with iDisk and dot mac/mobile me for a while now, what if they made it a free and integral part of the OS?



    You wouldn't be obliged to store your info online, but online backup, sync and access would be a click away for every Mac user.



    Sure, they've still got some work to do to make all of that work perfectly, even for the relatively small subset of paying customers that they're handling now, but they are working out the kinks.



    Particularly if Apple expands on their mobile offerings, cloud integration keeps everything talking to each other and your files available to whatever your using, even when your local storage is constrained.
  • Reply 7 of 14
    shadowshadow Posts: 373member
    I don't believe this "rumor" is based on info from sources. This is made up stuff. Too lazy to elaborate why this is not going to be the next at.
  • Reply 8 of 14
    kim kap solkim kap sol Posts: 2,987member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by shadow View Post


    I don't believe this "rumor" is based on info from sources. This is made up stuff. Too lazy to elaborate why this is not going to be the next at.



    It definitely is made up stuff.



    Apple has trouble getting iDisk to not hang the entire Finder and some bozo is trying to make us believe that Apple is moving towards cloud services?



    1. Apple is not ready for this.

    2. The internet is not ready for this.

    3. ISPs aren't ready for this.



    We're moving into an age of faster local storage using SSDs and someone's going to make me believe that we're going to sit down and watch gigabytes of data being uploaded to a server? Someone's going to have to do lots of convincing for me to move my data from a fast, reliable and secure local storage to a slow, unreliable and relatively insecure remote storage.



    Nobody's gonna stand for it. Once you use an SSD, you're not going back to an archaic and slow system.
  • Reply 9 of 14
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,664member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kim kap sol View Post


    It definitely is made up stuff.



    Apple has trouble getting iDisk to not hang the entire Finder and some bozo is trying to make us believe that Apple is moving towards cloud services?



    1. Apple is not ready for this.

    2. The internet is not ready for this.

    3. ISPs aren't ready for this.



    We're moving into an age of faster local storage using SSDs and someone's going to make me believe that we're going to sit down and watch gigabytes of data being uploaded to a server? Someone's going to have to do lots of convincing for me to move my data from a fast, reliable and secure local storage to a slow, unreliable and relatively insecure remote storage.



    Nobody's gonna stand for it. Once you use an SSD, you're not going back to an archaic and slow system.



    Heh. Actually, I think it's me that's running with that ball, albeit in a kind of half-hearted, "sure, I'll bite" sort of way.



    If the OP is yanking our chain, just floating "Clouded Leopard" without any further claims is a clever way to do it, though.



    Can't say I disagree with the state of "the cloud", but persistent, ubiquitous access to certain data is a pretty big win, even for the average user, and ever more so with the coming proliferation of smaller form factor touch devices.



    If Apple could get even cross device sync to work reliably, seamlessly, and close to invisibly, and do it at no charge to the customer, that would be huge.



    Not saying it's going to happen, but you have to imagine that Apple has at least considered it. It would make their burgeoning multi-device ecosystem all the more attractive.
  • Reply 10 of 14
    ivan.rnn01ivan.rnn01 Posts: 1,822member
    So, nothing really new in view... Not a good sign... Not a good sign...
  • Reply 11 of 14
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kim kap sol View Post


    It definitely is made up stuff.



    Apple has trouble getting iDisk to not hang the entire Finder and some bozo is trying to make us believe that Apple is moving towards cloud services?



    1. Apple is not ready for this.

    2. The internet is not ready for this.

    3. ISPs aren't ready for this.



    We're moving into an age of faster local storage using SSDs and someone's going to make me believe that we're going to sit down and watch gigabytes of data being uploaded to a server? Someone's going to have to do lots of convincing for me to move my data from a fast, reliable and secure local storage to a slow, unreliable and relatively insecure remote storage.



    Nobody's gonna stand for it. Once you use an SSD, you're not going back to an archaic and slow system.



    I wasn't assured 2011 would be a fixed date but was however told that is the aim year.



    But what your trying to tell me is that in 2-3 years our internet and our devices won't get any faster? So what we have right now will just be all we will ever get?



    I wouldn't put it past Apple to "innovate" like they have so much in the past. Look how far we have come from 3 years ago!!! A 1GB thumb drive cost over $125 and was considered large 3 years ago! Now 1GB costs less that $10 and 1TB is considered a reasonable of storage.



    I guess what I'm saying is that my friend that told me this information is very reliable. I absolutely trust that my friend knows what their talking about.



    MobileMe is most definitely an extremely relaxed "beta" for Clouded Leopard.



    Our storage devices can only get so cheap and so large in capacity before they need to innovate to the next level. Apple will be the first company (again) to innovate and push us to the next "big thing".
  • Reply 12 of 14
    brlawyerbrlawyer Posts: 828member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by shadow View Post


    I don't believe this "rumor" is based on info from sources. This is made up stuff. Too lazy to elaborate why this is not going to be the next at.



    Not to mention that this whole "cloud" idea for storage and online apps is gonna burst just like the financial market in the next couple of years...a bag of hurt in terms of privacy and data protection, and as overrated/failed as tablet Windows PCs.
  • Reply 13 of 14
    shadowshadow Posts: 373member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by atom000bomb View Post


    I wasn't assured 2011 would be a fixed date but was however told that is the aim year.



    But what your trying to tell me is that in 2-3 years our internet and our devices won't get any faster? So what we have right now will just be all we will ever get?



    I wouldn't put it past Apple to "innovate" like they have so much in the past. Look how far we have come from 3 years ago!!! A 1GB thumb drive cost over $125 and was considered large 3 years ago! Now 1GB costs less that $10 and 1TB is considered a reasonable of storage.



    I guess what I'm saying is that my friend that told me this information is very reliable. I absolutely trust that my friend knows what their talking about.



    MobileMe is most definitely an extremely relaxed "beta" for Clouded Leopard.



    Our storage devices can only get so cheap and so large in capacity before they need to innovate to the next level. Apple will be the first company (again) to innovate and push us to the next "big thing".



    The main reasons I think Clouded Leopard is not going to happen:
    • Apple charges for MobileMe now. If they release an OS version that depends on it, it should be included in the OS price. This will also dramatically boost the required bandwidth.

    • Processors are going multicore. 2 years from now we will have 32+ cores on the CPU only, and there is GPGPU... SL sets the foundation for this. I don't see Apple suddenly changing direction.

    • The code name Cloded Leopard is lousy. I don't think Apple is going to stick to Leopard for a decade, unless they are scared that they are running out of cats

    The only reasonable possibility is the new sub-notebook integration with the main computer.
  • Reply 14 of 14
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,544moderator
    I don't think online services will ever be reliable enough that people would want to switch to online-only but I see companies trying things like this:



    http://www.onlive.com/



    Delivering high end video games to even the lowest end platform. If they can pull it off, there's no reason why they couldn't do the same with an OS so that people can use/try OS X out before switching. I actually don't think they will pull off onlive simply because of the resources per user issue but I use Leopard's screen sharing online and although it would need to be refined considerably, we're still talking about 1680 x 1050 over a 2Mbit connection in real-time with a bit of lag in the display here and there.



    This is a good way for Apple to show off software like ilife, Final Cut, Logic etc to PC users without them buying a Mac. Perhaps it could go to the extent that people setup online accounts and use it for simple tasks like maybe being able to edit images in an online Photoshop for their Bebo accounts.



    It won't replace OS X on the desktop but I could see a usable product from an online-only version of Leopard. Like video-games, it would be aimed at non-critical usage. If you lose your video game stats for example, it sucks but it's not a huge deal. If you lose the contents of your hard drive, it's a bit different.
Sign In or Register to comment.