For those who are scared with built-in batteries

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited January 2014
I've read quite a few post where people were complaining about built-in batteries in MacBook Pro 17". The biggest disadvantage was inability to care second battery in order to provide maximum mobility for road warriors.

With latest revisions of 13" and 15" models using this kind of batteries I expect increase in number of such posts.



But not everyone knows about external batteries. They connect directly to DC-in port and charge notebook's battery in the same way that standard power supply does. Most of external batteries on the market are universal: they ship with several connectors for most popular vendors' models, support different DC voltage output and few even can charge your mobile phone or MP3-player via powered USB port.



Most notebooks have standard DC-in connector that only requires two wires - DC voltage and Ground. Magsafe is another story. It has 3 (5 for symmetry) pins - DC, Ground and control pin (central). Theoretically you can make your own connector to use with 3rd party external battery, but while powering your MacBook like an AC adapter, it won't charge your battery without properly working central pin. Apple's Magsafe Airline adapter works in a similar way.



There're still some models that have proper MagSafe cable and are able to charge internal battery or just have MagSafe cable included. Here's what I found:



Quickertek - charges internal battery, each model only supports either MacBook Air or MacBook or Macbook Pro.



BatteryGeek -doesn't charge internal battery (only acts as external power source), some models have widely adjusted output voltage and are compatible with many devices on the market (notebooks, players, phones etc.), MagSafe adapter is available.



HyperMac - charges internal battery, supports only Apple notebooks (automatically adjust voltage output = compatible with all MagSafe-equipped notebooks)





I preordered 100Wh HyperMac model since it's only brand available in Russia.

Here's HyperMacs' specification:









I hope my post will be helpful for those dissapointed with new irreplaceable batteries.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 4
    Also becoming less of a factor now that airlines are retro-fitting airplanes with regular 110v outlets at every seat. (At least the airline I use has done this.)
  • Reply 2 of 4
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,227member
    I sold batteries with laptops back in the day when a good battery lasted a couple of hours.



    The day they hit 4+ hrs legit on a full charge the biz died. The only vendors making any money on the batteries were the 3rd party companies trying to come in cheaper.



    I thought Apple was crazy trying to put an integrated battery into a laptop but they talked the talk and walked the walk. I haven't heard of many complaints.
  • Reply 3 of 4
    I've never needed to swap laptop batteries, if you charge when ever you can there are very few times when you truely need a second battery.
  • Reply 4 of 4
    kestralkestral Posts: 225member
    I have owned nothing but Apple laptops since 1998, and you know what, I have never, ever bought an extra battery or needed one. Of course that's me personally so I can't speak for others, but for me, the in-built battery makes zero difference to me, I usually upgrade computers once a year anyway.
Sign In or Register to comment.