Leopard upgrade to Snow Leopard ... the same as the full version of Snow Leopard???

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
Hi folks ... long time reader, first time poster!! So I'm doing it. I'm switching from PC to Mac. I've been waiting for a while now and the new MacBook Pro's have convinced me. I'm buying the 13 inch this week.



However I'm slightly worried about the upgrade to Snow Leopard in September.



My question is if I buy a new MacBook Pro this week and upgrade from the current version of Leopard to Snow Leopard will it be the EXACT same as the version of Snow Leopard that ships with new MacBooks after September?



Is the upgrade just the same as the full software version available post September? Does the upgrade it just detect if you have the previous software and installs as if it were the full? Or does it just "patch" things depending on what's different from previous versions?



I can wait till after Snow Leopard is released in September 09 if it is different to Leopard upgraded to Snow Leopard.



Apologies if this is a stupid question. I await your answers with baited breath ...

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 15
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,341member
    Yes for all intents and purposes it'll be the same Snow Leopard. The upgrades do not differ from the standard version.
  • Reply 2 of 15
    shadowshadow Posts: 373member
    In terms of functionality, it is exactly the same version as the standalone version. In terms of installation process it might be slightly different.



    When Leopard started shipping all new macs were supposed to ship with it, but they had the previous version pre-installed. Apple added "drop in" updates. The installer was checking for Tiger partition and refusing to continue if none was found. This is generally not a problem unless you decide to re-format the drive. Then you need to install the older version first and then update. As far as I remember, you could still select the "erase and install" option from the installer, which effectively formats the drive and installs the new version, settings are not migrated. But the previous OS version needs to be installed to get there. Also, there is always an "archive and install" option, which makes a clean install (without migrating preferences and settings, the home and Applications directories are also clean) but the old data is moved to a separate folder.



    When updating all system resources are replaced with the new ones, only the relevant information is migrated, e.g. users, network settings.



    I think Apple wants everybody to update, so they may skip previous version check. There is already a precedent: the latest iLife and iWork copies do not have serial numbers. BUt I think they will keep the check.
  • Reply 3 of 15
    shadowshadow Posts: 373member
    Ok, and the data and user settings could be migrated using Mobile me. This is my favorite. When making installation on a second mac, or just creating an account on the family computer, I can get all my settings, including mail accounts and filters, Safari bookmarks, the keychain with passwords and even the Dock and widgets the way they are on my MacBook. But your data and additional software is not migrated over Mobile me, of course.
  • Reply 4 of 15
    Thanks guys ... much appreciated.



    So let me get this straight ... the version of Snow Leopard I get when I upgrade from Leopard in September will be identical to the version of Snow Leopard pre-installed on MacBook Pro's post September???



    Or if there are differences what are they?
  • Reply 5 of 15
    sequitursequitur Posts: 1,910member
    I read that MacMail will be different (as far as IMAP is concerned) if there isn't a clean install of SL.
  • Reply 6 of 15
    a_greera_greer Posts: 4,594member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by OceanFrog View Post


    Thanks guys ... much appreciated.



    So let me get this straight ... the version of Snow Leopard I get when I upgrade from Leopard in September will be identical to the version of Snow Leopard pre-installed on MacBook Pro's post September???



    Or if there are differences what are they?



    As a general rule, the os should be the same, but regaurdless of the OS, mac windows or linux, I usualy do a clean install and then restore my personal files from a backup and reinstall all apps..., that way you are sure to end up with no cruft getting in the way...I would recomend archive and install.
  • Reply 7 of 15
    shadowshadow Posts: 373member
    There could be a debate whether you should prefer a clean install or not [after a couple of months of use]. But the question is: are the two versions identical? The answer is: YES, except the possible pre-install check.
  • Reply 8 of 15
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,660member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sequitur View Post


    I read that MacMail will be different (as far as IMAP is concerned) if there isn't a clean install of SL.



    I don't understand that. How so?
  • Reply 9 of 15
    sequitursequitur Posts: 1,910member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by addabox View Post


    I don't understand that. How so?



    "Welcome improvements to the speed in which Mail renders IMAP mail indexes are also reported, though this discovery can be put up for debate given these advances are seen following a clean install of Mac OS X in which Mail's database is largely empty."



    http://www.appleinsider.com/articles...w_leopard.html
  • Reply 10 of 15
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,660member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sequitur View Post


    "Welcome improvements to the speed in which Mail renders IMAP mail indexes are also reported, though this discovery can be put up for debate given these advances are seen following a clean install of Mac OS X in which Mail's database is largely empty."



    http://www.appleinsider.com/articles...w_leopard.html



    Oh. Well, yeah, clean installs can yield speed improvements over updates, for a while, on account of clearing out caches and unused pref files and the like. That doesn't have any bearing on wondering about the difference between a boxed retail copy of Snow Leopard and a dl'ed update, however.
  • Reply 11 of 15
    jonnyboyjonnyboy Posts: 525member
    i can't see them removing the option of a clean install. whilst not necessary as it is with windows, a new operating system release is a good time to have a clean out. it usually helps me to decide which apps i'm actually using and which i can discard. i can see there being just a simple "please insert you leopard disc as proof of purchase" verification
  • Reply 12 of 15
    Here's a quick primer from another former PC guy. You need to decide which version of Mac OS X you want. Choose between the following options:



    1 - Mac OS X Server. If you don't know why you would need this, then just buy:



    2 - Mac OS X Desktop.



    There are no "starter", "basic", "home", "premium", "business", or "ultimate" versions of Mac OS X. Just Desktop and Server. Everything you get on a new computer, you get with the upgrade. Nothing to "unlock". No "trial versions". No pay-for-feature upgrades.



    You have to love it when even the pricing and tiers are simple.
  • Reply 13 of 15
    carniphagecarniphage Posts: 1,984member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RoboNerd View Post


    There are no "starter", "basic", "home", "premium", "business", or "ultimate" versions of Mac OS X. Just Desktop and Server. Everything you get on a new computer, you get with the upgrade. Nothing to "unlock". No "trial versions". No pay-for-feature upgrades.



    And no 32bit and 64bit versions either!



    C.
  • Reply 14 of 15
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jonnyboy View Post


    i can see there being just a simple "please insert you leopard disc as proof of purchase" verification



    Or for that matter, trust your customers. Believe it or not, software houses once survived without onerous license verification gimmicks.
  • Reply 15 of 15
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post


    And no 32bit and 64bit versions either!



    C.



    Yeah, neither of which work with each other. Yeeeeesh.
Sign In or Register to comment.