Anti-phishing measures already turning up in Safari 3 builds

2»

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 30
    walshbjwalshbj Posts: 864member
    It would be bad if they overloaded Preview with features. Its fast load time is one of its primary benefits.
  • Reply 22 of 30
    louzerlouzer Posts: 1,054member
    Woohoo! Anti-phishing tools! Too bad all they do is check a list of bad sites, which, usually, are taken down once they're found out, anyway. Basically, it won't stop people if the site isn't on the 'bad' list yet.
  • Reply 23 of 30
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Louzer


    Woohoo! Anti-phishing tools! Too bad all they do is check a list of bad sites, which, usually, are taken down once they're found out, anyway. Basically, it won't stop people if the site isn't on the 'bad' list yet.





    Are you sure? What if they also combined the 'bad' list with a list of known good sites for different companies/websites. I.e. If the site has EBay in it and a sign in and password field, if the url is not http://*.ebay.com flag as possible fraud.



    I'm sure they would have no problem getting companies to submit information to the list especially for a company as big and reputable as Google.
  • Reply 24 of 30
    meelashmeelash Posts: 1,045member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rebel_without_a_pc


    I find it ironic that the pic shows Safari logging into eBay-- seeing as how eBay is the reason that my Dad stopped using Safari; Safari's back button does not load search ebay results correctly because it always starts at the top of the page so you lose your place.



    Works fine for me. And I use it a lot. I assume you're talking about when you search, scroll down to some spot and click on an item then later "back" up to that page? You just have to wait until the page loads completely (the address bar gets unhighlighted) and it will go to the spot you were on before.
  • Reply 25 of 30
    meelashmeelash Posts: 1,045member
    What I'm concerned about is false hits. What about sites that are okay and get placed on the list? How do you go about getting "off" the list so people will visit your site again? And if it becomes common to get these kind of messages on sites where there isn't really a danger, than people will get desensitized to the messages. Kind of like the security warnings or the "unsigned drivers" warnings in Windows- nobody actually reads them, they just hit "Okay" automatically when something like that pops up.



    I think part of the solution can be that, rather than the kind of message in the screenshot, Safari can just not Autofill the forms on the page and give a message to the effect "Safari did not Autofill the forms because.... etc." and give a confirmation message if the user manually enters some info and hits "Enter".
  • Reply 26 of 30
    wow just downloaded inquisitor...this is cool!!!!!! like the black search results pain...mmmmm black gui in leopard me thinks.



    http://www.apple.com/downloads/macos...nquisitor.html
  • Reply 27 of 30
    Did the anti-phishing feature get dropped in the release Leopard?
  • Reply 28 of 30
    dave k.dave k. Posts: 1,306member
    Apparently it was dropped from Leopard.



    I thought it was a neat idea but it had privacy concerns. Does one really want to send each and every URL they click on to Google?
  • Reply 29 of 30
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dave K. View Post


    Apparently it was dropped from Leopard.



    I thought it was a neat idea but it had privacy concerns. Does one really want to send each and every URL they click on to Google?



    That didn't stop firefox. The other option was to use a downloaded blacklist that updates twice an hour or something. Besides though, according to the privacy policy, Google doesn't store any info about where the URL came from.
  • Reply 30 of 30
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by icfireball View Post


    That didn't stop firefox. The other option was to use a downloaded blacklist that updates twice an hour or something. Besides though, according to the privacy policy, Google doesn't store any info about where the URL came from.



    And Telcos don't sell your private contact information even after Congress adds you to a no-call list.



    Get used to be backhanded by companies, especially a company like Google whose sole business model centers around information.
Sign In or Register to comment.