Apple may host Leopard event, intro ultra-portables, bring iPhone to Best Buy

2

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by McDavies View Post


    What features do people want in a ultra-portable? Can anyone give an example of an ultra-portable on the PC side? Do they sell well.



    SONY VAIO VGN-X505 is 1.85 lbs. and has a 10" display.

  • Reply 22 of 53
    onlookeronlooker Posts: 5,252member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Porchland View Post


    I think he means a media event to announce Leopard rather than waiting until WWDC. 'Tard.



    Being that Steve Jobs said Leopard would be ready in early to mid spring, not early summer I think WWDC was never a possibility, unless there was a delay in which they would have noted it at a shareholders meeting.



    And don't call people names - "Tard". Or you'll get banned.
  • Reply 23 of 53
    louzerlouzer Posts: 1,054member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by onlooker View Post


    Being that Steve Jobs said Leopard would be ready in early to mid spring, not early summer I think WWDC was never a possibility, unless there was a delay in which they would have noted it at a shareholders meeting.



    And don't call people names - "Tard". Or you'll get banned.



    Um, WWDC is in eary June, which, last time I looked, is not summer, anywhere. I don't recall Steve-o promising early-mid spring, just saying spring. So WWDC is a possibility.



    However, I don't think its a non-shocker that there might be a media event for the launch. I don't recall a media event for Tiger. And I'm not sure the point of a media event anyway, unless its where they're going to disclose those 'top-secret uber-great features' that Steve made up......um....I mean.....uh.....disclosed....yeah, that's it, disclosed!



    So, technically, there is no delay (Apple has pushed the limits of these seasonal promises before, you know). But even if there was, they couldn't have noted it at a shareholders meeting. The shareholders meetings take place in April. They might have needed to mention it on one of their earnings conference calls, but that's not likely necessary, either.
  • Reply 24 of 53
    The headline is misleading. You think there's some new inside information and you just get these wild analysts' speculation. I totally agree with brianus and bdkennedy1 and I guess this is just a way of AI to push more ad views.
  • Reply 25 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Louzer View Post


    Um, WWDC is in eary June, which, last time I looked, is not summer, anywhere. I don't recall Steve-o promising early-mid spring, just saying spring. So WWDC is a possibility.



    Erm, I think you will find the WHOLE of June IS fully considered to be in summer in most places around the world. Don't know about the US.
  • Reply 26 of 53
    onlookeronlooker Posts: 5,252member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Louzer View Post


    Um, WWDC is in eary June, which, last time I looked, is not summer, anywhere. I don't recall Steve-o promising early-mid spring, just saying spring. So WWDC is a possibility.

    ...................



    June 21st is the first day of summer. I don't know about you, but AFAIAC early spring probably wouldn't be one week before the first day of summer.
  • Reply 27 of 53
    onlookeronlooker Posts: 5,252member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Bishop of Southwark View Post


    Erm, I think you will find the WHOLE of June IS fully considered to be in summer in most places around the world. Don't know about the US.



    Your right about that. In California, and AZ where I am. It's freaking 110º 120º by June. We definitely consider it full blown summer by then.
  • Reply 28 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    "We believe Apple is likely to hold another event by April or May to launch Leopard and/or other new Mac products (models with larger displays at least)," analyst Ben Reitzes wrote in a note to clients this week.



    Err 'models with larger displays' could only really be a 15" MacBook or am I overlooking something obvious?
  • Reply 29 of 53
    onlookeronlooker Posts: 5,252member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mrtotes View Post


    Err 'models with larger displays' could only really be a 15" MacBook or am I overlooking something obvious?



    Yeah, like Mac Pros with 33' cinema displays.
  • Reply 30 of 53
    Right, because Apple bundles displays with their Pro Desktops?!?!?



    If it said "and/or other new Mac products (new models and larger displays at least)," then I could understand the ambiguity.
  • Reply 31 of 53
    bageljoeybageljoey Posts: 1,972member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Bishop of Southwark View Post


    Erm, I think you will find the WHOLE of June IS fully considered to be in summer in most places around the world. Don't know about the US.



    I knew it was coming.



    Someone with too much time on there hands should track how many discussions on the dates of spring have been started on AI as a result of Leopard and WWDC...
  • Reply 32 of 53
    desarcdesarc Posts: 642member
    i read an article on appleinsider that one analyst believes that summer should start on june 21st. june 20th and earlier is technically spring.

    ..and another analyst has reliable inside sources who hint that technicaly it's winter until march 21st.

    regardless, apple will be holding a special event to discuss the iSeasons where Q2 lasts until Adobe releases intel-native apps.
  • Reply 33 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Bishop of Southwark View Post


    Erm, I think you will find the WHOLE of June IS fully considered to be in summer in most places around the world. Don't know about the US.



    But it's a fact of planetary rotation that the Summer Soltice is 21 June - the longest day of the year. So while some people may think all of June is Summer they are not following the natural laws.
  • Reply 34 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Bishop of Southwark View Post


    Erm, I think you will find the WHOLE of June IS fully considered to be in summer in most places around the world. Don't know about the US.



    For half of the planet June tends to be autumn/winter - Here in NZ it's usually pissing sideways rain by then...
  • Reply 35 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Johnny Mozzarella View Post


    SONY VAIO VGN-X505 is 1.85 lbs. and has a 10" display.





    Looks like I might slice up my arms just trying to hold that thing?
  • Reply 36 of 53
    End of March, end of March, end of March... Full shipping Leopard in April.

    Just my prediction (and predeliction) ... 8)
  • Reply 37 of 53
    Aparently from this and other rumors sites - we will see a sub notebook from Apple soon... Any predictions on pricing, features, and how this will affect the Mac Mini? Is Apple daring enough to do an HD-TV?



    PS Unfortunately, Lexus is the other way and has a $35,000 competitor for the Accord - Called the ES350, basically a Camry with $10,000 to 15,000 to the price tag... Same engine and suspension, etc. as the Camry except for the body panels...
  • Reply 38 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mrtotes View Post


    But it's a fact of planetary rotation that the Summer Soltice is 21 June - the longest day of the year. So while some people may think all of June is Summer they are not following the natural laws.



    "not following the 'natural laws'.", please!



    I don't see where you get this idea that I'm denying when the summer solstice occurs?

    (And incidentally the 21st isn't really the longest day in practice now).

    At least we are agreed that day is in summer (we are agreed on that arn't we?) - because it would be VERY strange if the longest day wasn't.



    I think the problem comes down to how you define the change point. There are various ways you can define the seasons, ways that can incorporate either/both astronomical factors and metrological ones.



    Does the longest day mark the START of summer or can be said to be safely within. Another name for the summer solstice is 'midsummer' - it would be odd if that name applied to the start of summer wouldn't it?



    I believe the traditional/normal/expected method involves the season label itself being centred on the seasonal peak, where as I have noticed some people who have this idea that the standard practice is for the name/label change to occur on the leading edge of the peak, rather than at the true change / low point.

    I don't know if that's how its taught in america and if it's creaping in through popular culture imports etc, but the majority of people I've noticed this with have been americans.



    Like many things, its a question of where you put your zero point.

    But I don't think I could summarise quite how odd and non standard your method seems to me (and indeed to a great many people).
  • Reply 39 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Bishop of Southwark View Post


    "not following the 'natural laws'.", please!



    I don't see where you get this idea that I'm denying when the summer solstice occurs?

    (And incidentally the 21st isn't really the longest day in practice now).

    At least we are agreed that day is in summer (we are agreed on that arn't we?) - because it would be VERY strange if the longest day wasn't.



    I think the problem comes down to how you define the change point. There are various ways you can define the seasons, ways that can incorporate either/both astronomical factors and metrological ones.



    Does the longest day mark the START of summer or can be said to be safely within. Another name for the summer solstice is 'midsummer' - it would be odd if that name applied to the start of summer wouldn't it?



    I believe the traditional/normal/expected method involves the season label itself being centred on the seasonal peak, where as I have noticed some people who have this idea that the standard practice is for the name/label change to occur on the leading edge of the peak, rather than at the true change / low point.

    I don't know if that's how its taught in america and if it's creaping in through popular culture imports etc, but the majority of people I've noticed this with have been americans.



    Like many things, its a question of where you put your zero point.

    But I don't think I could summarise quite how odd and non standard your method seems to me (and indeed to a great many people).



    Dude, I don't know where you are from, but in my country, and I suspect most of Europe, schools teach the astronomical definitions of season: the equinoxes and solstices mark the beginning of the seasons. For my country (the Netherlands) this definition is actually quite correct, july and august and early september are the hottest months on average and tend to be considered summer.



    Edit: That doesn't mean I don't hope apple follows the meteorological definition of spring, as i need a macbook by may and would love leopard to go with that 8)
  • Reply 40 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dutch pear View Post


    Dude, I don't know where you are from, but in my country, and I suspect most of Europe, schools teach the astronomical definitions of season: the equinoxes and solstices mark the beginning of the seasons. For my country (the Netherlands) this definition is actually quite correct, july and august and early september are the hottest months on average and tend to be considered summer.



    Edit: That doesn't mean I don't hope apple follows the meteorological definition of spring, as i need a macbook by may and would love leopard to go with that 8)



    Yeah I think it's an English (UK/US) thing... Going more by summer being start of June to end of August. The summer solstice is important, but in Australia anyway it is thought of as, for example, winter in Australia, is start of June, giving a bit of time for the solstice to come 'round on June 21, and then a good two months after the solstice (July, August) for the "lag" to catch up and where winter really kicks in.



    Meteorological is normally used in Denmark, the former USSR, and Australia (advanced 6 months). In modern United Kingdom and Ireland there are no hard and fast rules about seasons, and informally many people use this reckoning. ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seasons )



    I suspect the US normally uses Meteorological views of the summer.



    "MidSummer" comes from more pagan history in the Great Britain and Ireland for example, in olden times. The summer solstice is exactly in the middle of summer, meaning summer starts 1/8 of a year before the solstice and ends 1/8 of a year after the solstice.



    The Wiki page we are listing ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seasons ) is pretty good. Looks like in Europe astronomical definitions of seasons are used, while US/ UK/ Australia use Meteorological definitions, with words such as "MidSummer" technically supposed to be used for pagan "Traditional" definitions of seasons.



    "Traditional seasons are reckoned by insolation, with summer being the quarter of the year with the greatest insolation, and winter the quarter with the least. These seasons begin about 4 weeks earlier than the Meteorological seasons, and 7 weeks earlier than the Astronomical seasons.



    In Traditional reckoning, the seasons begin at the cross-quarter days. The solstices and equinoxes are the midpoints of these seasons. For example, the days of greatest and least insolation are considered the "midwinter" and "midsummer" respectively.
    "
Sign In or Register to comment.