Flip4Mac announces Drive-In..a new take on DVD Ripping

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
http://www.flip4mac.com/drivein.htm



Drive-in is an innovative application that allows you to store your personal DVD movie library on your Mac. It is now available as a public beta.



Using Drive-in you can create an image of a DVD disc on your laptop or home entertainment system. The image preserves the quality, navigation and special features of the original DVD and can be played using Apple?s DVD Player or Front Row.



Drive-in preserves the DVD?s original content protection. Drive-in allows you to play your images on any computer that you own but does not allow you to share your images with others.



To simplify the way you search and access your videos, we've added some helpful information like the DVD cover art, names of actors, movie description, etc. Once you've stored movies to your hard drive - just browse, select and play!



Drive-in is a great tool for:

Laptop owners who like to watch movies on the go
DVD collectors with a home theater system
Families who often misplace or damage DVDs
While you can create DVD images for free using this public beta, you must purchase the final release if you wish to use those images, or create new ones, after the beta testing period has ended. This beta software will expire on May 1, 2007.


Help us test Drive-in by downloading the beta today!

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 16
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,341member
    Those who use Mac mini for HTPC applications are sure to love this app. I think though that it would need some network capabilities before it really takes off.
  • Reply 2 of 16
    akacakac Posts: 512member
    Why would you want this app? I can right now create a disk image of any DVD and it works on my laptop at anytime.
  • Reply 3 of 16
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,476moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Akac View Post


    Why would you want this app? I can right now create a disk image of any DVD and it works on my laptop at anytime.



    If they can get it to work using an Apple TV then I could see a lot less complaints about it not having a DVD drive.
  • Reply 4 of 16
    galleygalley Posts: 971member
    But there's no compression, right? That means 4-8GB per movie.
  • Reply 5 of 16
    yeah. i'm not sure i'm getting why this is a benefit? why not just rip the dvd without restriction if you're going to store it at full size. otherwise, rip and re-encode it to a smaller size.
  • Reply 6 of 16
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,341member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by admactanium View Post


    yeah. i'm not sure i'm getting why this is a benefit? why not just rip the dvd without restriction if you're going to store it at full size. otherwise, rip and re-encode it to a smaller size.



    Yes I know. F4M is banking on the ease of use and the good conscious of buyers. Many people, accustomed to the access benefits of digital music files, feel ripping their DVDs is Fair Use. It's going to be a tough sell IMO.
  • Reply 7 of 16
    indeed. at this point, the kind of people who have enough storage to comfortable store any decent movie library are people likely already know how to rip their dvd's. honestly, at this point i don't see anyone making it easy to rip and catalogue your dvd collection other than apple.
  • Reply 8 of 16
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by admactanium View Post


    yeah. i'm not sure i'm getting why this is a benefit? why not just rip the dvd without restriction if you're going to store it at full size. otherwise, rip and re-encode it to a smaller size.



    Well I think the idea is that you maintain the DVD experience. You will have your extra features, options, etc available.
  • Reply 9 of 16
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by blue2kdave View Post


    Well I think the idea is that you maintain the DVD experience. You will have your extra features, options, etc available.



    i can do that now without restrictions by just ripping it with mactheripper.
  • Reply 10 of 16
    Last I checked, I can do that simply by making a disk image of a DVD. I've never done anything besides make a disc image of a DVD and play it for say an airplane trip and then delete it and that worked for me. Granted I don't do it often, but last one I did was the Spiderman 2 DVD.



    So what is so hard about that?
  • Reply 11 of 16
    galleygalley Posts: 971member
    I tried it last night, and I must say I really like it. But it's a shame you can't use some kind of compression. There's no way I have that much room for 300 DVDs.
  • Reply 12 of 16
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by admactanium View Post


    i can do that now without restrictions by just ripping it with mactheripper.



    Well this a library/browser too, integrating artwork.
  • Reply 13 of 16
    How does it fair with new copy protection tricks (DVDs with blank cells etc.)?
  • Reply 14 of 16
    brussellbrussell Posts: 9,812member
    The only think interesting about this, IMO, is that it claims to preserve the copy protection. If DVD ripping could be supported by the MPAA, and if compression could also be used, it has the potential to make DVD ripping more commonplace.
  • Reply 15 of 16
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by blue2kdave View Post


    Well this a library/browser too, integrating artwork.



    That's what iTunes is for!
  • Reply 16 of 16
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpinDrift View Post


    That's what iTunes is for!



    But iTunes doesn't support raw DVD images. You're right though, this is basically an iTunes like interface to navigate between all of your ripped VIDEO_TS folders. Not a huge deal, but kinda cool IMHO.
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