Vodafone seen as frontrunner for European iPhone contract

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 53
    If Apple are going to stick with EDGE for the initial European release of the iPhone, it would make sense that Apple goes with Orange. MacFormat states that Orange is the only network (at least in the UK) that offers an EDGE service.
  • Reply 22 of 53
    oberpongooberpongo Posts: 174member
    Looking at the iPhone Specs, T-Mobile would be an ideal partner:

    They can offer an excellent data plan and WiFi Coverage in most of their Markets with their 10000+ HotSpots and also (at least in Germany) are the only carrier offering EDGE. Something the iPhone will definitely need as long as it is not 3G
  • Reply 23 of 53
    iioiio Posts: 2member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by oberpongo View Post


    Something the iPhone will definitely need as long as it is not 3G





    i reckon it would be better if they supported 3G (UTMS), it is more widely used in Europe. i can see why EDGE was chosen in the US but that shouldn't be reason to to the same for Europe.



    regarding networks, as i mentoined above, O2 would seem like the obvious choice. However, choice is nice! and it would be better if it was not just one carrier. iPhones for all networks... bring it on!
  • Reply 24 of 53
    sennensennen Posts: 1,470member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Morris View Post


    A phone without SMS/text messaging. They'd sell three (ok, perhaps four) units in the whole of Europe.



    did you even read any of the posts in this thread?! \
  • Reply 25 of 53
    amoryaamorya Posts: 1,103member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by the_snitch View Post


    I don't think they will do MMS, as that is why the iPhone features real email - you can attach as many files as large as you want, and as much text as you want, without being imposed by size and character limits like MMS.



    But you can't address them to a phone number. That's an annoyance for me. I want to send pics to someone whose email I don't know... with iPhone, I'm screwed.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tomozj View Post


    I live in the UK, and I've been on O2 for years. They're alright, but a bit of a scam. I recently switched to T-Mobile who are good, but because they are based in the US also that would cause alot of problems with AT&T I guess.



    The #1 network in the UK for Apple I guess is Orange, because they are cheap in some ways, easy to deal with and have lots of customers who trust them and enjoy using their network. Orange also extends to parts of Europe, as I see when I'm roaming.



    Another network they could use is 3, but I think that it's based in the UK only and for anything 2G, it uses other networks (Orange, switching to O2 soon I think).



    Meh.



    -tj



    If they go with Orange, they'd get all the Apples and Oranges jokes into their ads.



    I'm on 3 now. Quite happy with them -- they can roam on both Orange and O2 (I was on a far-flung Scottish isle recently and 3 had the best signal, because they weren't tied to one company's transmitters). I'd switch to Orange if needed, but not Vodafone. Orange had great customer service, and I only left them for price. Voda were cheap but the service was shit.
  • Reply 26 of 53
    morrismorris Posts: 25member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sennen View Post


    did you even read any of the posts in this thread?! \



    Yes, I did. A careful reader would have seen the word "they'd" in my post and understand I don't think Apple would be so stupid to launch a phone without SMS.
  • Reply 27 of 53
    irelandireland Posts: 17,793member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider


    Meanwhile, reports obtained by both AppleInsider and other Wall Street analysts have suggested that Apple could introduce a version of the iPhone based on 3G wireless technology in Europe during the first half of 2008.



    Don't you mean.. meanwhile Apple is just going to release only a 3G version in Europe in the fourth quarter of 2007, doing a similar move which Sony did when they decided not to release the crippled version of its product in Euopre.



    In the US Wi-Fi is much more ubiquitous than 3G, so Apple had good reasons to go with Edge there. The same does not apply to Europe, at this moment in time Wi-Fi is basically non-existent here, so 3G is needed.
  • Reply 28 of 53
    gsxrboygsxrboy Posts: 565member
    Three in Australia is massively better and cheaper for mobile data (x series) than anyone else (i.e. Telstra/Optus/Voda). 3G is being pushed big time by all the telcos, as is mobile broadband.
  • Reply 29 of 53
    Vodafone seems a 'sensible' choice for Apple.



    It allows for a broader release across Europe and potentially the rest of the world. One company to negotiate with, rather than 20 smaller companies. Vodafone are both a big 2G player and big 3G player (otherwise Three would also be worthwhile). I guess T-mobile could be problematic due to US competition.



    That said - if Vodafone isn't much good in the UK that's bad. In Australia they're quite good, in NZ they're great. Unfortunately I'm on prepaid so I can't get data allowances for any internet connectivity or email... then again we can be pretty sure that the Apple phone is not targetted at the prepaid audiences!



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post


    They talk about 3G technology for the iPhone in the first half of '08. Can someone please clarify, is 3G technology something that would be internally related to the iPhone as a hardware component or software component.



    3G is a hardware requirement, it is a substantial improvement.
  • Reply 30 of 53
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,325member
    I find it interesting that bothe the biggest network in the US, and outside of the US are both vilified here.



    Despite the fact that people here don't seem to like them, they ARE the biggest networks, and they are picking up new customers at a good clip.



    Obviously, someone likes them.



    Apple would be foolish to go with a small service just because some people think they are better.



    And as there isn'r even an agreement as to which smaller service is better here, you all disagree with each other!



    Apple is still better off going with the biggest.
  • Reply 31 of 53
    smsm1smsm1 Posts: 6member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by melgross View Post


    I find it interesting that bothe the biggest network in the US, and outside of the US are both vilified here.



    Despite the fact that people here don't seem to like them, they ARE the biggest networks, and they are picking up new customers at a good clip.



    Obviously, someone likes them.



    Apple would be foolish to go with a small service just because some people think they are better.



    And as there isn'r even an agreement as to which smaller service is better here, you all disagree with each other!



    Apple is still better off going with the biggest.



    I think it is the case that each network has it's own pros and cons. Everyone is different. No one network will be able to cater for everyone. This is why there is competition.



    Currently I do not use the phone enough to make it worthwhile having a contract, thus I'm on pay as you go.
  • Reply 32 of 53
    What no one seems to have noticed is that Vodafone recently embarked on upgrading their entire 3G network to HSDPA. They call it 3G Broadband and its rated at 1.4Mb/s download.



    I'm from the UK and I have an Orange handset (K800i) and also a 3G Broadband USB Modem from Vodafone. I use it on my MBP for business when I'm away from my office (which is quite a lot).



    The difference in coverage between the two networks is quite noticeable. Vodafone just get to places that Orange don't, especially with 3G (HSDPA). And as for the speed; well I've got MenuMeters installed in the menu bar, and it's not uncommon for me to see 175KB/s (yep that's bytes) download speed over my 3G Broadband mobile link.



    Everyone goes on about Vodafone customer service. But if your phone and network are working properly, why do you even need to call them? I can't remember the last time I had to talk to a customer service rep from either network.



    I'm hoping that Apple choose Vodafone as this will give them the opportunity to implement HSDPA. Only then will the iPhone realise its true potential as an Internet Appliance.
  • Reply 33 of 53
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


    In the US Wi-Fi is much more ubiquitous than 3G, so Apple had good reasons to go with Edge there. The same does not apply to Europe, at this moment in time Wi-Fi is basically non-existent here, so 3G is needed.



    http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20061206-8369.html



    This article indicates the UK and Ireland have the largest number of hot spots per capita in the world.



    oberpongo pointed out in this thread that T-mobile had 10,000 hotspots - that article indicates the US has 26,000



    I rented an apartment in Switzerland in Jan/feb that had a wireless network.



    So exactly how does all that equate to non-existent?
  • Reply 34 of 53
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by melgross View Post


    I find it interesting that bothe the biggest network in the US, and outside of the US are both vilified here.



    Despite the fact that people here don't seem to like them, they ARE the biggest networks, and they are picking up new customers at a good clip.



    Obviously, someone likes them.



    Apple would be foolish to go with a small service just because some people think they are better.



    And as there isn'r even an agreement as to which smaller service is better here, you all disagree with each other!



    Apple is still better off going with the biggest.



    I agree. I think these big networks are popular with businesses, tradesmen, the self employed because they have the greatest signal coverage - that has to be the single biggest factor if you are one of these types of users and are selecting a network.



    It is the ONLY reason I am with Vodafone in Ireland.



    On this forum we are all mostly savvy cost conscious individuals (cheapskates) whereas I suspect for a lot of users of these two networks (cingular, Vodafone) they don't really care because it is all tax deductible to them.
  • Reply 35 of 53
    aegisdesignaegisdesign Posts: 2,914member
    The BIGGEST problem with Vodaphone and Orange for that matter too, is their data charges. Neither offer an all in plan. You pay £2.35 per MB. That will kill an internet phone. T-Mobile charge £7.50 for unlimited data per month. Unless Vodafone change their pricing structures there's no way I'm getting an iPhone on Vodafone.



    As to which is best, I generally find Vodaphone has slightly better coverage and Orange much better customer service. I'm on both currently.
  • Reply 36 of 53
    charelcharel Posts: 93member
    I must be missing something. Here, in The Netherlands all phones are offered at varying prices by many phone operators coupled with contracts.

    These can also be for prepaid contracts. The telco's provide the Sim card.

    Why would Apple restrict itself to only one provider when no other phone maker does this?
  • Reply 37 of 53
    jemsterjemster Posts: 37member
    Grrrrr also being in the UK I echo the NOT VODAFONE sentiment very strongly. If this is all Apple will allow in the UK then I'll certainly not be buying an iPhone.



    Why? Because Vodafone specialise in screwing the customer, that's why. I took out an 18 month contract last year that included a 100 text / 33 MMS / 5.5MB data package. 15 days later they took away the 33 MMS messages from the package because apparently "consumer research" said that many people were unaware that they had them therefore they weren't needed and we could pay extra for them .



    A couple of weeks ago they sent a mail saying they are taking data out of the text bundles as well - at the moment 100 texts is roughly 5.5MB data and I use some data each month (around 2-3MB spread over the month). So now they want me to pay for that as well for alledgedly the same "consumer research" reasons.



    So basically, when you have found a contract with Vodafone that does what you want, it's worthless. They chop and change it as they like with total contempt for their existing customers. I've never experienced anything like it in 10 years of mobile phone contracts.



    I really hope this is just a very bad rumour...
  • Reply 38 of 53
    from my point of view, this cannot be true, as vodafone wants to have its vodafone live offerings inside the phone, which has been refused by Apple.
  • Reply 39 of 53
    All the mobile phone networks suck one way or the other, so it is a matter of which sucks less and this will depend on your own circumstances.



    3 (aka. Hutchinson), only do 3G and not 'ordinary' GSM, this would preclude iPhone users being able to roam between the US and Europe for example, and would logically rule them out.



    Orange (aka. France Telecom), the only one to do EDGE in the UK so that's a plus point. Also has some Wifi hotspots, but like all the other commercial Wifi providers charges bankrupting prices to use them. Orange charges the most expensive data roaming prices of them all. For example someone worked out that a UK Orange customer roaming to the US and then downloading an iTunes music track would be charged nearly £100!!! (and that excludes the £0.79 Apple charge). See http://news.zdnet.co.uk/communicatio...9234846,00.htm



    T-Mobile. Has the advantage of having their own Wifi hotspots, but like all the other commercial Wifi providers charges bankrupting prices to use them. For an individual T-Mobile offer the best 'unlimited' data tariff which on a cost per bit basic works out to be a sixth the cost Vodafone charge.



    o2 (aka. Telefonica). Has no Wifi hot-spots of its own but is a bigger player than Orange or T-Mobile (at least in the UK). Very expensive data costs.



    Vodafone. The biggest network company in the world. Historically has been 'Mac friendly' in supplying Mac compatible datacards earlier than its competitors and is currently the only one offering a USB 3G/HSDPA data 'card' which works with MacBooks in the UK (the other networks still only offer PC-Card devices which will not work with MacBook or MacBook Pro laptops).



    If I was looking at this as an individual then T-Mobile on paper would be the best, however they along with Orange here in the UK use the 'wrong' frequency (900MHz instead of 1800MHz) which means they don't work in my cars built-in phone system.



    From a business point of view all of them without exception suck big time in terms of data costs when you are looking at multiple users. O2 and Vodafone for example charge about £12 per month per handset on top of which you then pay for the data allowance, so this means I would have to pay HUNDREDS of pounds a month (thousands a year) before I even get to pay for or use any data for our companies users.



    It is the fact that all the network companies suck that lead to a lot of people hoping originally that Apple was going to setup their own network or become an MNVO (Mobile Network Virtual Operator), sadly events since have shown this is not going to happen and we will still be stuck with the brain dead idiots running the current networks.



    Here in the UK the same idiots who run the mobile phone networks also run the majority of Wifi hotspots and will likely also run [or more accurately ruin] WiMax which mean WiMax will also be crippled with extortionate fees and not turn out to be the 'great white hope' that I and others had been hoping for.



    Note: 'free' Wifi in the UK is practically non existent, apart from of course the 9 Apple stores . The UK may have plenty of Wifi hotspots but they are nearly all commercial and cost literally a small fortune to use. To show you how outrageous the costs are, an Internet Café charges an average of £1 an hour, for this they have to rent office space, pay for lighting, heating, furniture, staff, computers, electricity, and Internet bandwidth, whereas for a Wifi hotspot the only costs are Internet bandwidth, a little electricity, and possible a small rental to stick their equipment on a lamp post or building (i.e. a fraction of the costs of an Internet Café), and yet Wifi hotspots cost an average of £8 ($16) an hour with lots of limitations!!!
  • Reply 40 of 53
    I have two criteria in getting an iPhone



    3G - that BS about wifi is fine if you live in SF, here in the UK, there may be a wifi bubble, but it costs an exhorbitant amount of money per month to use and I don't like Starbucks.



    A contract provider that does a 'web and walk' deal like T-Mobile.



    It's that simple, what makes me laugh is all the hocus pocus customer centric BS that comes out from PR justifying these decisions - that fact remains Apple will go with the provider that is willing to give into their demands - has nothing to do with customers.



    If the iPhone is out and Vodafone or whoever is still doing that ludicrous pay per MB rubbish then it's no dice - I'll stick with my MDA Vario II on T-Mobile.
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