Photoshop CS3 and my Mac Pro...

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
I think I have a problem. I always save my work as .psd files, and these look like they are supposed to. When ever I goto save my work as a JPEG, or anything else, when I open it in preview it looks a lot brighter then it does in Photoshop, it looks white washed. I have tried different settings, different formats, I even tried .pdf. I do a lot of print work, and I'm worried now that if I give a client some of these files and they get them printed, it will look horrible. What should I do? Should I try calibration software? Could it be a setting in Photoshop? I used CS2 fine on the same computer, as soon as I switched to CS3, it became a problem. I downloaded the updates and everything as well. Any ideas on what to do?

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 15
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Digital Disasta View Post


    Any ideas on what to do?



    Don't use preview to look at your images. Seriously.



    I find that it does a horrible job at properly displaying images. You might try to consider some test images into iPhoto or some other image program and see if it looks any better in there. I'm pretty certain it will.
  • Reply 2 of 15
    I find it really strange though that under CS2 it rendered the images fine, now with CS3 it is really bad. I will try to save one image a few times with different formats and try to open it in different programs and see how it turns out I guess. Is it possible that my CS3 has an exporting problem though, can that even happen?
  • Reply 3 of 15
    yamayama Posts: 427member
    Preview uses ColorSync as a colour management system and tries to adjust the image on screen based on whatever colour profile you have set up in your Display system preferences and the colour profile that was saved with the image.



    Photoshop, by default, will use its own colour management system and tries to adjust the image on screen based on whatever colour profile you have selected in Photoshop and the colour profile from the image.



    If you set the same same colour profile in System Preferences and in Photoshop, and set Photoshop to use ColorSync as its colour management system, Preview should display the image identically to Photoshop. Well, in theory anyway



    Whether or not you want to set Photoshop to use ColorSync as the colour management system is up to you. This is a thorny subject however, and some people have rather, er, strong opinions on which system is better and what you should be doing.



    Ultimately, my feelings are that you should go for whatever looks good for you. Unless you need to send your photos to a professional print shop, in which case I'd suggest spending some time learning about colour management theory and how it works in Photoshop.
  • Reply 4 of 15
    Well, I do need to send stuff to clients and print houses. I just don't know which outcome is right. I am assuming that I did the work in Photoshop, that what it is showing is right, but I could be wrong? Under preview, it looks really bad. How do I find out which is closer to print? I also do web work, would I need to switch profiles between the two? My school never covered this kind of stuff, so I'm real clueless.
  • Reply 5 of 15
    yamayama Posts: 427member
    I would expect, and please someone correct me if I'm wrong, that most print shops will be dealing with customers who leave Photoshop/Illustrator/InDesign to use Adobe's colour management system. So leave that as is.



    Do calibrate your screen though, using either Apple's ColorSync utility or something more professional involving one of those sensors you place on the screen. When you have a profile created, select it in the Display system prefs.



    Choosing which colour profile you should set in the Photoshop colour management prefs is a bit more objective... In my own experience I would set the colour profile you just created as the profile for Photoshop and set this profile to be included when saving files. This way, when others open your file, the colour management system they are using will adjust the colours on screen based on the profile you saved with the image and on whatever colour profile they have selected for their display.



    Mind you, if you're sending images to print shops you should be converting all your images to CMYK anyway. Then save the image with a generic CMYK profile.



    There are people who argue that you shouldn't use your own profiles in Photoshop and instead use something generic like Adobe RGB 1998 because:

    A) It's a wide gamut profile that gives you more colours than you could ever hope to display on a normal CRT monitor.

    B) It's about as standard a profile as it gets and everybody has it so in theory there is no conversion process involved when people open images with that profile (if they are also using Adobe RGB 1998).



    It is a complicated subject, and experts in the area can demand a fair amount of money doing colour management work for others. My own knowledge stems from my Adobe certifications (ACE & ACI) for Illustrator CS and Photoshop CS. Plus a few years working as a 2nd line analyst for Adobe tech support. And honestly, I know the basics, but I'm by no means an expert.
  • Reply 6 of 15
    holy sh!t I'm confused. I guess I'm gonna have to read up on this some where. Any suggestions on where would be a great help.
  • Reply 7 of 15
    yamayama Posts: 427member
    The Photoshop online help is a good start. The Photoshop manual that came with CS was never much use - most of the interesting stuff just points you to the online help files anyway. Does CS3 even come with a manual these days? Or is it all just PDFs on the "extras" CD?



    http://livedocs.adobe.com/en_US/Phot...55E987DFB.html



    http://livedocs.adobe.com/en_US/Phot...B1D991390.html



    If you want something that's a little less technical and with more real-world examples, head down to your local library and have a look around their tech section. They'll often have books for older versions of Photoshop kicking around - they're perfectly fine. The functionality of the product hasn't changed much in the last 5 years.



    If you'd like something video based you could do worse than to check out Total Training. Again your local library might have some older releases of these videos. I find some of the presenters kinda annoying and goofy, but the information they provide is pretty solid, particularly some of the Premier Pro stuff.
  • Reply 8 of 15
    no manual, I just have the extra cds, but I also downloaded the trail and then upgraded, so i don't know what's in the box. Thanks for the info, I'll have a look at those links and check out some books.
  • Reply 9 of 15
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,873moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by yama View Post


    If you set the same same colour profile in System Preferences and in Photoshop, and set Photoshop to use ColorSync as its colour management system, Preview should display the image identically to Photoshop. Well, in theory anyway



    Yeah that's what I do. I used to use the Adobe profile in Photoshop and it gives really deep vivid colors but the trouble is that whenever you export for the web, it desaturates everything because 'the web' uses sRGB - by that I mean the majority of end users (Windows users) will use sRGB. Plus if you don't set the display profile to the same one, you get the color mismatch between PS and every other program and setting it to Adobe then means you're not seeing web pages as they were intended because they assume you use sRGB (the washed out standard that came from PC monitors - we seem to get a lot of crappy standards from PC users).



    So, I now have my display and PS set to use the sRGB colorspace and it seems to work out ok for me. I don't do stuff with print though - my brother does and he said they use a hardware device that reads the screen and that calibrates the display:



    http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...-profile.shtml



    Then he gets profiles for the devices he has to output to. All these profiles seem complicated but they are just colorspace translators. The file itself has a set of colors that are fixed RGB values - assuming 32-bit, it's 256 values of R,G and B. However, you don't know if an output device can generate the same range of colors as another so a value of 128,0,0 might produce two different colors on different output devices as that number is mapped to a different range of colors.



    So a colorspace profile translates the image for a specific device based on the tagged profile of an image - the display and workspace profiles do so for your screen display and the printer ones do so for your printed output.



    http://www.gballard.net/psd/cs.html

    http://www.gballard.net/nca.html
  • Reply 10 of 15
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


    Yeah that's what I do. I used to use the Adobe profile in Photoshop and it gives really deep vivid colors but the trouble is that whenever you export for the web, it desaturates everything because 'the web' uses sRGB - by that I mean the majority of end users (Windows users) will use sRGB. Plus if you don't set the display profile to the same one, you get the color mismatch between PS and every other program and setting it to Adobe then means you're not seeing web pages as they were intended because they assume you use sRGB (the washed out standard that came from PC monitors - we seem to get a lot of crappy standards from PC users).



    So, I now have my display and PS set to use the sRGB colorspace and it seems to work out ok for me. I don't do stuff with print though - my brother does and he said they use a hardware device that reads the screen and that calibrates the display:



    http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...-profile.shtml



    Then he gets profiles for the devices he has to output to. All these profiles seem complicated but they are just colorspace translators. The file itself has a set of colors that are fixed RGB values - assuming 32-bit, it's 256 values of R,G and B. However, you don't know if an output device can generate the same range of colors as another so a value of 128,0,0 might produce two different colors on different output devices as that number is mapped to a different range of colors.



    So a colorspace profile translates the image for a specific device based on the tagged profile of an image - the display and workspace profiles do so for your screen display and the printer ones do so for your printed output.



    http://www.gballard.net/psd/cs.html

    http://www.gballard.net/nca.html



    I have to get home tonight and play around with all this. Thanks for the info. Looking at all this now, I feel like they should cover some of this in school. This is some confusing sh!t, to me anyway.
  • Reply 11 of 15
    jockojocko Posts: 11member
    I know nothing about Macs as I am on the verge of switching, However, I do all my printing through a wonderful program called Qimage and I get perfect results. (Colorwise.)
  • Reply 12 of 15
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jocko View Post


    I know nothing about Macs as I am on the verge of switching, However, I do all my printing through a wonderful program called Qimage and I get perfect results. (Colorwise.)



    Color profiles can be some difficult things to get a grasp of, but I can recommend something when you've calibrated your monitor, use that screen profile and want to save a jpg via Save as for Web...



    There's a tab above the Save as for Web dialog "(>)" that you should set to Use Document Color Profile. If you use web colors to match against a background web color, this will ensure that if you create an image with one, it matches perfectly. It also stops the screen profile from shifting to an "improper", lightened color.
  • Reply 13 of 15
    I calibrated my monitor and i selected the profile, but now I dont know how to set adobe to use colorsync. Can anyone help me out?
  • Reply 14 of 15
    yamayama Posts: 427member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Digital Disasta View Post


    I calibrated my monitor and i selected the profile, but now I dont know how to set adobe to use colorsync. Can anyone help me out?



    In Photoshop CS1 you would go the menu Photoshop CS > Color Settings, then under the section for Conversion Options set the Engine to "Apple ColorSync".



    I expect they changed things around in CS3 though... Have a search through the help files for "colorsync" and "color management".
  • Reply 15 of 15
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by yama View Post


    In Photoshop CS1 you would go the menu Photoshop CS > Color Settings, then under the section for Conversion Options set the Engine to "Apple ColorSync".



    I expect they changed things around in CS3 though... Have a search through the help files for "colorsync" and "color management".



    Thanx, I'll look for it when I get home today.
Sign In or Register to comment.