Apple execs, Intel share, Lotus software, MBA SuperDrive, more...

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
Apple executives received significant bonuses that included millions in stock-based compensation for their service to the company during fiscal 2007. Meanwhile, Intel is gaining share on rival AMD, the MacBook Air's SuperDrive may be limited to use with new notebook, and IBM is not yet ready to unleash its Lotus software suites for Apple's desktop and mobile products.



Executive compensation



Several of Apple's senior executives received considerable compensation packages in fiscal 2007, according to regulatory filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Chief executive Steve Jobs, however, was not one of them.



Jobs has taken home a $1 annual salary since he rejoined the Apple in 1997 and began serving as interim CEO. In 1999, the company awarded him a $43.5-million Gulfstream V aircraft as an executive bonus in recognition of his performance during the two previous years.*



Jobs also received two stock option grants, one in 2000 and another in 2001. However, he never exercised those grants, and they were both cancelled in March*2003 when the company awarded him a new grant of 5*million shares of restricted stock because the older grants had gone underwater.



After a portion of those shares were withheld for the payment of taxes,*Jobs received the remaining 5,426,447 shares. With the addition of a 30,000 stock options grant that was awarded to him when he was elected to the company's Board in 1997 and exercised after two stock splits, Jobs currently holds just over 5.55 million shares of Apple common stock.



"In fiscal year 2007, Mr.*Jobs’s entire compensation consisted of his $1 annual salary," Apple said in its most recent fling. "Because Mr.*Jobs’s continued leadership is critical to the Company, the Compensation Committee is considering additional compensation arrangements for him."



For their roles, Chief Operating Officer Timothy Cook, Chief Financial Officer Peter Oppenheimer, Senior Vice President of Retail Ron Johnson, and Senior Vice President of iPod Division Tony Fadell, each received bonus between $500,000 and $700,000 respective of their salaries, in addition to millions in stock-based compensation (see chart, below).



Each executive, with the exception of Jobs, also received an iPhone from the company valued at a tax gross-up of $379.







Intel gains on AMD



Meanwhile, Intel Corp. has reportedly widened its lead over archrival Advanced Micro Devices Inc., as the worldwide personal computer chip-maker posted an 8.5% sequential fourth-quarter growth, according to the International Data Corp.



Intel was still the No. 1 PC chip maker, with 76.68% share of total shipments in the fourth quarter, up from 74.55% in the year-ago period, according to IDC. AMD was still No. 2 with 23.09%, compared to 25.32% in the same quarter the previous year.



Intel also remained dominant in the three major PC chip markets -- desktops, notebooks and servers -- IDC said.



Air's SuperDrive limitations



The MacBook Air's $99 external SuperDrive may only be recognized by the Air rather than any computer due to custom requirements for both the new sub-notebook and its peripheral.



More high-quality photos (1, 2) of the new MacBook Air.



While external optical drives have existed that rely on the USB port alone, the particular power demands of the Apple-made drive should prevent it being used elsewhere, reports Electronista. The Air's sole USB port has been boosted past its specifications to supply enough power to use the drive with just the data cable rather than a direct power connection.



IBM holds on Lotus



IBM is still preparing the launch of a Lotus Notes web client for the iPhone and iPod touch, despite earlier reports from the Associated Press that the software would be released at this week's Lotusphere conference.



IBM now claims that the client is "not something that [it's] ready to go out and market or launch." Lotus Notes is a long-standing collaborative suite which integrates e-mail, calendars and other workgroup applications.



Skyhook behind Maps with location



Finally, the USAToday takes a closer look at Skyhook Wireless, which helps provide some of the technology behind the location feature of Apple's new mobile Maps application for the iPhone and iPod touch.



According to Skyhook chief executive Ted Morgan, the technology works as follows: "Every Wi-Fi access point, whether public or private, sends out a signal every second or so, like a lighthouse. We pick up those signals and use our technology to calculate your exact location."



Skyhook, which detects but does not connect to those Wi-Fi networks, sent teams of drivers around the USA and Canada to map out hot spots in order to get its service up and running. The firm claims to have 70% of North America covered and is now cruising Europe and Asia to build its database.



Skyhook's system works best indoors and in urban settings, while GPS is better in areas with clear views of the open skies, to reach satellite signals. As a result, Apple uses a combination of Skyhook's WiFi technology and Google's technology in the new version of Maps.



The software looks for Wi-Fi signals first, and if there are none, it switches to Google's cell-tower information, the USA Today reports.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 40
    crebcreb Posts: 276member
    The Apple exec pay is old news.



    Do we know for a fact that Apple's USB Air SuperDrive is solely for the MBA? It seems Apple could make more money if it weren't.
  • Reply 2 of 40
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,253member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CREB View Post


    The Apple exec pay is old news.



    Do we know for a fact that Apple's USB Air SuperDrive is solely for the MBA? It seems Apple could make more money if it weren't.



    If what they said about the power over USB is true. Then it can't work with other machines.



    I just hope that it doesn't have a standard USB plug. If it does, it could possibly damage a standard USB port.



    I would imagine that to prevent that, Apple either has some special tit on the plug that corresponds to a small slot on the jack so that it can't go into any other USB jack anywhere else, or, it has firmware that quickly detects if the jack is from the Air before the drive spins up.
  • Reply 3 of 40
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,253member
    Quote:

    and Google's GPS technology



    What???
  • Reply 4 of 40
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CREB View Post


    The Apple exec pay is old news.



    Do we know for a fact that Apple's USB Air SuperDrive is solely for the MBA? It seems Apple could make more money if it weren't.



    We know that the MBA's USB port pushes out more power to run the SuperDrive when it's attached. We knew that last week at MacWorld.



    I'm surprised that the MBA SuperDrive doesn't have at least one USB port on it.
  • Reply 5 of 40
    lorrelorre Posts: 396member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by melgross View Post


    If what they said about the power over USB is true. Then it can't work with other machines.



    I just hope that it doesn't have a standard USB plug. If it does, it could possibly damage a standard USB port.



    I would imagine that to prevent that, Apple either has some special tit on the plug that corresponds to a small slot on the jack so that it can't go into any other USB jack anywhere else, or, it has firmware that quickly detects if the jack is from the Air before the drive spins up.



    I think it just needs more power than the USB standard is providing. Therefore the MBA port can deliver more watts than a normal USB port.



    I think the drive just won't power on if it's connected to a normal USB port, because it just doesn't get enough power to run.
  • Reply 6 of 40
    crebcreb Posts: 276member
    It is too bad if the Air SuperDrive only pushes Air. A major aspect that Apple has going, and has always had going for it, is design. I would much prefer to purchase an Air SuperDrive for an external unit (for many reasons) versus another. Apple could provide firmware/software updates via iTunes on other platforms.
  • Reply 7 of 40
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,253member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Lorre View Post


    I think it just needs more power than the USB standard is providing. Therefore the MBA port can deliver more watts than a normal USB port.



    I think the drive just won't power on if it's connected to a normal USB port, because it just doesn't get enough power to run.



    The USB power spec is considerably lower than the one for FW, which can supply a full .5 amp. That and USB can burn out if too much power is drawn.



    If if there is nothing to prevent it from running, it will attempt to do so. That's why either a physical layer, or firmware query is required.
  • Reply 8 of 40
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,253member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CREB View Post


    It is too bad if the Air SuperDrive only pushes Air. A major aspect that Apple has going, and has always had going for it, is design. I would much prefer to purchase an Air SuperDrive for an external unit (for many reasons) versus another. Apple could provide firmware/software updates via iTunes on other platforms.



    That's why it's too bad it doesn't have a FW 400 port. That would have taken care of the problem.
  • Reply 9 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    While external optical drives have existed that rely on the USB port alone, the particular power demands of the Apple-made drive should prevent it being used elsewhere, reports Electronista. The Air's sole USB port has been boosted past its specifications to supply enough power to use the drive with just the data cable rather than a direct power connection.



    Right. So now, Apple needs to make a tiny update to AppleTV hardware. That one update would be upgrading the USB port to this same higher power one. Then, we can all support Apple even more by buying the USB Superdrive to play DVDs on our AppleTVs.



    Let all the "Why would I want my AppleTV to play DVDs? I already have a DVD player" comments begin....



    Some might think it strange, but I would buy an AppleTV/Superdrive combo in a minute if it meant combining TWO boxes under my TV into one (and saving on inputs and connections on the TV and receiver.)
  • Reply 10 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CREB View Post


    It is too bad if the Air SuperDrive only pushes Air. A major aspect that Apple has going, and has always had going for it, is design. I would much prefer to purchase an Air SuperDrive for an external unit (for many reasons) versus another. Apple could provide firmware/software updates via iTunes on other platforms.



    Love to see how you could do it. Perhaps it is a little more complicated than you imagine.



    http://www.electronista.com/articles...r.usb.details/

    http://www.macnn.com/articles/08/01/...r.special.cpu/
  • Reply 11 of 40
    They should have put a DC in jack in there to make it compatible with everything else, the MBA's USB port would just happen to be able to supply all the power itself.



    I wonder you are able to hook one of these to an Airport or Time Capsule and access it wirelessly.
  • Reply 12 of 40
    jabohnjabohn Posts: 572member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Skyhook, which detects but does not connect to those Wi-Fi networks, sent teams of drivers around the USA and Canada to map out hot spots in order to get its service up and running. The firm claims to have 70% of North America covered and is now cruising Europe and Asia to build its database.



    I guess Skyhook hasn't sent anyone driving around my neighborhood yet. Maps can't find me on my ipod Touch.
  • Reply 13 of 40
    gqbgqb Posts: 1,934member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jabohn View Post


    I guess Skyhook hasn't sent anyone driving around my neighborhood yet. Maps can't find me on my ipod Touch.



    I'm out in the boonies, and it was so accurate on my touch I could drop a water baloon on my house.

    Actually I was so suspicious that I started looking for some entry in my addressbook that it may have been using instead of this poor-man's gps.

    I have a 'me' entry, but that's imported from Exchange.

    Haven't tried from away from my home wifi yet.



    As an aside, the article seems to indicate the the wifi gps is used first on the iPhone, and then Google's cell-tower gps is used if not on wifi.

    But Steve seemed to indicate that if an iPhone is on wifi, then both were used and somehow amalgamated.
  • Reply 14 of 40
    I will reiterate on a thread earlier about the SuperDrive for Air being not compelling enough to beat the competition for people looking to use an external slim DVD Drive to connect to a Mac.



    Clearly, this drive is only for the MacBook Air and at $99 it's a one stop shop.



    The $99 drive Sony slim drive isn't slot loading but as an external drive it's got a very nice form factor and it can be run on machines other than the Air.



    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16827131052



    LiteOn has a cheaper drive that looks physically cheaper:



    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16827106097



    You'd think Apple would produce an external drive machines that want a second SuperDrive or older machines that don't have a SuperDrive but want a burner.



    It also looks like the Industry is gearing up for a BluRay drive/combo DVD-DL burner situation.



    Blu-Ray Burners:



    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...ray+DVD+Burner



    Blu-Ray Readers:



    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...+DVD-ROM+Drive



    I don't see Blu-Ray taking off until readers are $99 or less.
  • Reply 15 of 40
    k.c.k.c. Posts: 60member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    The MacBook Air's $99 external SuperDrive may only be recognized by the Air rather than any computer due to custom requirements for both the new sub-notebook and its peripheral.



    More high-quality photos (1, 2) of the new MacBook Air.



    While external optical drives have existed that rely on the USB port alone, the particular power demands of the Apple-made drive should prevent it being used elsewhere, reports Electronista. The Air's sole USB port has been boosted past its specifications to supply enough power to use the drive with just the data cable rather than a direct power connection.




    Which part of "Requires..." don't people understand ?



    MacBook Air SuperDrive (MB397G/A)

    Play or burn discs directly with the external USB-based MacBook Air SuperDrive. Thin, light, and easy to take with you, this drive is designed specifically for MacBook Air.



    Slot-loading 8x SuperDrive (DVD±R DL/DVD±RW/CD-RW)

    Size: 139 x 139 x 17 mm / 5.47 x 5.47 x 0.67 inches (L x W x H)

    Weight: 320 g (0.71 pounds)

    Requires MacBook Air with available USB 2.0 port



    http://www.apple.com/macbookair/specs.html



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    The Air's sole USB port has been boosted past its specifications ...



    How it could be boosted beyond it's own specs ?



    What you meant to say was that the Air's USB port has been boosted beyond the standard USB 2 specs, right ?
  • Reply 16 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post


    The $99 drive Sony slim drive isn't slot loading but as an external drive it's got a very nice form factor and it can be run on machines other than the Air.



    It is also 2.7 lbs plus the external power adapter, about the size of a cigarette pack.



    MacBook Air Super Drive slimmer all round, i.e., 5.47" x 5.47" x 0.67" (L x W x H) vs 6.5" x 6.0" x 2.5" for the Sony
  • Reply 17 of 40
    Someone, Belkin or other, will create a small and very inexpensive USB adapter that simply boosts the power output so you can run the MBA SuperDrive on any computer. I give it less than two weeks before it is announced.
  • Reply 18 of 40
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,253member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post


    I will reiterate on a thread earlier about the SuperDrive for Air being not compelling enough to beat the competition for people looking to use an external slim DVD Drive to connect to a Mac.



    Clearly, this drive is only for the MacBook Air and at $99 it's a one stop shop.



    The $99 drive Sony slim drive isn't slot loading but as an external drive it's got a very nice form factor and it can be run on machines other than the Air.



    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16827131052



    LiteOn has a cheaper drive that looks physically cheaper:



    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16827106097



    You'd think Apple would produce an external drive machines that want a second SuperDrive or older machines that don't have a SuperDrive but want a burner.



    It also looks like the Industry is gearing up for a BluRay drive/combo DVD-DL burner situation.



    Blu-Ray Burners:



    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...ray+DVD+Burner



    Blu-Ray Readers:



    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...+DVD-ROM+Drive



    I don't see Blu-Ray taking off until readers are $99 or less.



    The two externals are both much bigger than the Apple model. People will likely prefer the Apple because of that, despite its limitations.



    Otherwise, I pretty much agree with the rest of the post.



    But, remember that the original Superdrive cost $1,000 as an external when Apple put it into its top Digital Audio model. I bought that model (it just died. A minute of silence please!).
  • Reply 19 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Nicnac View Post


    Right. So now, Apple needs to make a tiny update to AppleTV hardware. That one update would be upgrading the USB port to this same higher power one. Then, we can all support Apple even more by buying the USB Superdrive to play DVDs on our AppleTVs.



    Let all the "Why would I want my AppleTV to play DVDs? I already have a DVD player" comments begin....



    Some might think it strange, but I would buy an AppleTV/Superdrive combo in a minute if it meant combining TWO boxes under my TV into one (and saving on inputs and connections on the TV and receiver.)



    AppleTV/Superdrive is STILL two boxes, although smaller ones.



    And no thanks, I'll stick with a regular DVD player until I'm watching all content from hard drive and internet.
  • Reply 20 of 40
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,253member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by K.C. View Post


    W

    How it could be boosted beyond it's own specs ?



    What you meant to say was that the Air's USB port has been boosted beyond the standard USB 2 specs, right ?



    Well, yes. I think most everyone understands that was what was meant.
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