Reseller's website offline following pledge of $400 Mac clone

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  • Reply 41 of 235
    yvo84yvo84 Posts: 84member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post


    Despite appearances, Apple is a hardware company. The purpose of the software is to add value to the hardware. Sure, they sell some software like Aperture, Final Cut, etc. But OSX and iLife are all about selling you the hardware. That's the reason they can sell you Leopard for $129 vs MS selling Vista for hundreds more. Apple makes their money on the hardware (that goes for computers, iPods, iPhones, etc).



    If they let other companies sell the hardware, we'd start seeing OS upgrades costing more and there would start to be draconian activitation processes like Windows has to prevent piracy. As it is, Apple is pretty liberal with their OS. You never have to enter an license codes or anything to install (unlike their professional apps).



    Agreed 100%.

    I think though.. Apple may actually be in for a little battle if this goes to courts, because the argument the other way invites competition -- which is what a Capitalist society is based on. Our society.
  • Reply 42 of 235
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bobertoq View Post


    The website isn't down anymore, now it's called Open Computer instead of OpenMac.



    Either they heard from Apple legal or this was as clever method of getting free press for their Hackintosh capable machine.
  • Reply 43 of 235
    ros3ntanros3ntan Posts: 201member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Superbass View Post


    The End-User license agreement is just that - an agreement with the "End User", not the manufacturer or necessarily the installer. The only person who can violate is whoever buys it. Apple would have to take the company to court to get lists of purchasers, and then sue the individual users, which would be difficult and time consuming.



    Does anyone know of any instances of a company actually suing for breach of EULA? I know that all of the recent piracy lawsuits have involved copyright law exclusively and not breach of EULA...



    the reason no one is suing is because its time consuming and costly. But, if you can win millions of dollars in profit after lawyers and stuff, they might pursue.



    As for UELA agreement, psystar has to buy those OS X from somewhere, and that would be Apple. They used it to install in a computer that is not approve by Apple and violates the agreement, Apple has a case here.
  • Reply 44 of 235
    vinitaboyvinitaboy Posts: 156member
    bsenka, you are going to get precisely what you pay for with this knock-off. That, and definitely no more. This is a hacked together wanna-be that's living on the edge legally, has absolutely NO track record for functionality and/or reliability, and comes from a company with absolutely NO record for service/warranty after the sale. NONE! And THIS is what you want as a replacement for your iMac?



    Man (or woman), you REALLY deserve this machine. Gawd help you and your heartbeat--you're truly going to need it.
  • Reply 45 of 235
    Good. Maybe this will kick Apple in the pants and lead them to plug that goatse-sized hole in their lineup.
  • Reply 46 of 235
    nasseraenasserae Posts: 3,167member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by yvo84 View Post


    Agreed 100%.

    I think though.. Apple may actually be in for a little battle if this goes to courts, because the argument the other way invites competition -- which is what a Capitalist society is based on. Our society.



    I really doubt that a 7~8% market share is considered a monopoly!



    I always thought that people who want cheap PC are better off buying a Windows or Linux machine. It is true that there are many free program available for Mac OS X but still Windows have more variety in price. The reason I switched to Mac is for the peace of mind. I don't have to worry about driver/OS update problems and I don't have to pay money if the computer breaks (yes I bought Apple Care). I got my iMac logic board replaced on warranty few months ago ($400 value for the parts).



    Just like those who jailbreak their iPhones. those who buy Hacked Mac computers are missing the most important features of any Apple product. Sure you can save $100 or $200, but is it worth the trouble and headache if you have problem?!



    Upgrades?! My iMac is 18 months old and I really don't see a need for any upgrade. Nothing really new except the aluminum case and a small increase in processors speed. I think I can go another year at least without worrying about an upgrade.



    That's what I think.
  • Reply 47 of 235
    gmon750gmon750 Posts: 39member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    There will always be cheapos out there unwilling to pay even a nickel for something, yet they will spend all of their waking hours to get something for nothing. This thread is evidence of that.



    Very much agree. For whatever reason, individuals have a false-sense of entitlement of wanting anything of value for next to nothing. They can complain about OSX being too expensive a price-point for entry. Well you know what? Too bad! A lot of things out there in the world are too expensive for me. If I can't afford it, I don't buy it.



    Apple machines work well because everything is designed to work well together. OSX in the wild would have the same problems as the windows environment. Unstable software components wreaking havoc and ruining the user-experience. Apple does not want to be in the business of supporting someone elses' hardware. If a regular user buys this guy's OSX-Clone to save a few bucks and it doesn't work right, they are going to blame Apple. But there are users out there that display a "screw-you" attitude.



    This manufacturer will most likely get a major licking from Apple's legal department and be thrown out of business.



    I will be buying my first Apple computer sometime this year. There is no way I would ever consider buying some chop-shop PC with a hacked OSX just to save a few bucks. And to refuse to deny Apple revenue for their machines simply because of your twisted sense to "Stick it to Jobs" or Apple-is-evil mentality just makes no sense.



    Why is Apple being teated different than any other closed-system company? If you can break a product (i.e. Toaster, PC, whatever) and get it to work for you, more power to you. If you do it illegally and expect it to work exactly the way the manufacturer of said product designed it, then you only have your own ignorance to blame for it.
  • Reply 48 of 235
    tomkarltomkarl Posts: 238member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gmon750 View Post


    Very much agree. For whatever reason, individuals have a false-sense of entitlement of wanting anything of value for next to nothing. They can complain about OSX being too expensive a price-point for entry. Well you know what? Too bad! A lot of things out there in the world are too expensive for me. If I can't afford it, I don't buy it.



    Apple machines work well because everything is designed to work well together. OSX in the wild would have the same problems as the windows environment. Unstable software components wreaking havoc and ruining the user-experience. Apple does not want to be in the business of supporting someone elses' hardware. If a regular user buys this guy's OSX-Clone to save a few bucks and it doesn't work right, they are going to blame Apple. But there are users out there that display a "screw-you" attitude.



    This manufacturer will most likely get a major licking from Apple's legal department and be thrown out of business.



    I will be buying my first Apple computer sometime this year. There is no way I would ever consider buying some chop-shop PC with a hacked OSX just to save a few bucks. And to refuse to deny Apple revenue for their machines simply because of your twisted sense to "Stick it to Jobs" or Apple-is-evil mentality just makes no sense.



    Why is Apple being teated different than any other closed-system company? If you can break a product (i.e. Toaster, PC, whatever) and get it to work for you, more power to you. If you do it illegally and expect it to work exactly the way the manufacturer of said product designed it, then you only have your own ignorance to blame for it.



    Agree completely on all points. I GLADLY pay a bit of a premium to have the Apple experience. Hardware and Software both.
  • Reply 49 of 235
    bsenkabsenka Posts: 799member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by VinitaBoy View Post


    bsenka, you are going to get precisely what you pay for with this knock-off. That, and definitely no more. This is a hacked together wanna-be that's living on the edge legally, has absolutely NO track record for functionality and/or reliability, and comes from a company with absolutely NO record for service/warranty after the sale. NONE! And THIS is what you want as a replacement for your iMac?



    Man (or woman), you REALLY deserve this machine. Gawd help you and your heartbeat--you're truly going to need it.



    No track record works both ways, they have no negative experiences yet either. When I said "if it comes to fruition" I guess I should have added "if it really works as a Mac". IMO, they don't even have to discount it. The form factor alone will drive sales. They could charge $1500 and they'll still get it if it works.



    Like I said in the first post, I want to buy a Mac from Apple, but Apple doesn't make the Mac I and millions of other Mac users need. If Apple gave me a choice, I'd go with them. Since they don't, I'll take my chances with the guy who actually gives me what I ask for instead of telling me what I should take. As it is, I bought a machine I hate, only because it was the only option that Apple gave me.
  • Reply 50 of 235
    inkswampinkswamp Posts: 337member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post


    Why are people so thick headed and ignorant? Apple sells hardware. That's the ONLY reason OS X, iTunes and the iPhone SDK exist. Turn OS X loose on crap PC hardware, iTunes loose crap MP3 players, and the iPhone SDK loose on crap cell phones, and Apple ceases to exist the next day. It's that simple. Don't you people know your Apple history? Apple turned Mac OS loose on third party hardware and damn near went out business in the 90's. Is the concept just too complicated for small minds to grasp?



    Where do you get the idea that I, as a consumer, must support Apple? If they don't have a product I want, then maybe a competitor should be allowed to step in to provide it.



    The OpenMac looks pretty damn good to me. Then again, I think the iMac and its Las Vegas glossy display sucks and the Mini is a freakin' overpriced box of circa-2006 leftovers. I've been using Macs for 15+ years and Apple, for the first time since I've been using Macs, has nothing that fits my needs and budget. And Apple apparently cannot hear the numerous calls from both consumers and high profile tech commentators for them to release a mid-range tower.



    Somewhere along the way, it appears that Apple lost their passion for making decent computers and are too infatuated with selling music and making cell phones. Look at the buyer's guide on MacRumors and explain why Apple is taking almost a year between updates on the iMac and the Mac Mini now? It wasn't like that three years ago. We could count on regular price drops or spec bumps every 4-5 months. But now Apple is showing a surprising lack of interest in their consumer machines.



    So you think I should support Apple? How about if Apple gets with the program and gets out of this 1998 all-in-one mentality and start making the products that people really want?
  • Reply 51 of 235
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by suhail View Post


    We need Apple to listen closely, we've been begging for a mid-tower Mac for ages!



    Exactly. Even if Apple Legal successfully sues these guys, if this is the kick in the pants Apple needed to realize the incredible demand for a mid-level headless Mac and actually build one, it's still a win.
  • Reply 52 of 235
    wilcowilco Posts: 985member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gmon750 View Post


    Very much agree. For whatever reason, individuals have a false-sense of entitlement of wanting anything of value for next to nothing. They can complain about OSX being too expensive a price-point for entry. Well you know what? Too bad! A lot of things out there in the world are too expensive for me. If I can't afford it, I don't buy it.



    Apple machines work well because everything is designed to work well together. OSX in the wild would have the same problems as the windows environment. Unstable software components wreaking havoc and ruining the user-experience. Apple does not want to be in the business of supporting someone elses' hardware. If a regular user buys this guy's OSX-Clone to save a few bucks and it doesn't work right, they are going to blame Apple. But there are users out there that display a "screw-you" attitude.



    This manufacturer will most likely get a major licking from Apple's legal department and be thrown out of business.



    I will be buying my first Apple computer sometime this year. There is no way I would ever consider buying some chop-shop PC with a hacked OSX just to save a few bucks. And to refuse to deny Apple revenue for their machines simply because of your twisted sense to "Stick it to Jobs" or Apple-is-evil mentality just makes no sense.



    Why is Apple being teated different than any other closed-system company? If you can break a product (i.e. Toaster, PC, whatever) and get it to work for you, more power to you. If you do it illegally and expect it to work exactly the way the manufacturer of said product designed it, then you only have your own ignorance to blame for it.



    The main point of your little speech seems to be that people who purchase this clone will expect Apple to support it. Even though no one on this thread -- or on any of the other boards I've read today on the subject-- has stated this expectation. I think it's a fair to make the assumption that anyone who would purchase a clone would be aware that they can't turn to Apple for support.,



    Your secondary point is that people who would choose to purchase a clone would be doing so out of spite (or because they're cheap), rather than to fill their need for a mid-range, expandable desktop. Again, you seem to be addressing comments/people that don't exist.



    In short, you talk a lot for someone who "will be buying my first Apple computer sometime this year".
  • Reply 53 of 235
    hillstoneshillstones Posts: 1,490member
    For $399 you get a piece of junk PC box with no software. They charge you $155 so they can install OS X for you. Add the software, FireWire, etc, and you are getting close to the price of an iMac without a display. Not only that, it will probably be a noisy piece of junk just like all the other PC's since the hardware won't be controlled by the software and the fans will run full speed all the time. Yeah, that is what people want. Since Apple's hardware is already flying off store shelves, people are willing to spend money for quality. They aren't looking for a cheap piece of junk. That is what Windows users want.



    Apple already had a mid-tower, the Power Mac G3 and G4. If you really want a tower, buy a Mac Pro. Apple isn't losing any money over not offering a cheap tower. Laptops already outsell desktops, and the iMac is very successful. So I think your market for a cheap mid-tower is pretty small. Small enough where Apple doesn't need one, which is why they phased out the smaller G3/G4 tower box and left the Mac Pro for the Pros.



    I much prefer my whisper quiet iMac over a noisy tower anyday.
  • Reply 54 of 235
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hillstones View Post


    I much prefer my whisper quiet iMac over a noisy tower anyday.



    Me too, but there are plenty of people that prefer an expandable machine that doesn't start at $2,500. I can't tell you how big the market is for a midrange, headless Mac, but if this forum is any indication there are a more than a few.
  • Reply 55 of 235
    citycity Posts: 522member
    Apple could charge $1,000 per copy for OSX without updates and discount it if it's being installed on an Apple upon registering the upgrade.
  • Reply 56 of 235
    inkswampinkswamp Posts: 337member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    Me too, but there are plenty of people that prefer an expandable machine that doesn't start at $2,500. I can't tell you how big the market is for a midrange, headless Mac, but if this forum is any indication there are a more than a few.



    I personally know three people IRL who were interested in buying Macs but went back to a Windows PC when they found out that the most affordable tower was not really affordable at all and didn't even come with a display. The iMac filled a need in its day, but it's time for Apple to let the all-in-one concept die.
  • Reply 57 of 235
    splinemodelsplinemodel Posts: 7,311member
    My typical response to people who whine about there not being a commodity desktop mac is, "go build one if you think there's such demand." Finally, a taker.



    If Apple Legal gives them trouble, they should open-source the HW design and all the FW.
  • Reply 58 of 235
    inkswampinkswamp Posts: 337member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Splinemodel View Post


    My typical response to people who whine about there not being a commodity desktop mac is, "go build one if you think there's such demand." Finally, a taker.



    If Apple Legal gives them trouble, they should open-source the HW design and all the FW.



    I don't hear people whining about Apple not making a commodity desktop Mac. What people really want is a reasonably priced tower Mac. That's not an unthinkable thought unless you're Apple and have fully entrenched yourself in the idea that the consumer level offerings should be all-in-one or scaled back in some unnecessary ways.



    If Apple made a couple mid-range towers for around $900-1200, I would buy (and I know others who would too) but that not because I'm cheap. It's because the Mac Mini is underpowered for my needs and the iMac is unacceptable with its glossy, low-quality screen. I think this kind of machine appeals to a wide range of people, not just people looking for OS X on commodity hardware.
  • Reply 60 of 235
    piotpiot Posts: 1,346member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by inkswamp View Post


    How about if Apple gets with the program and gets out of this 1998 all-in-one mentality and start making the products that people really want?



    but it's time for Apple to let the all-in-one concept die




    It's funny how Apple's Mac sales are growing between two and three times the rest of the PC industry by selling systems that nobody wants.



    Also funny that while Apple should kill of it's AIO desktop all the big PC players have just been introducing theirs.



    Kind of amusing that while sales of desktops (especially to consumers) are falling, the 'mid range Mac tower' brigade all justify their needs by saying "I want one." My three friends want one" "millions of other Mac users want one too" Finally they come up with the old "Apple is stupid... shooting themselves in the foot" routine.



    Look, it's a shame that Apple doesn't make the perfect system for you, but stop trying to say that it's a glaring error on Apple's part and that they are losing out on millions of dollars in sales. I suspect Apple takes a different view.
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