Apple's Snow Leopard to offer text auto-correction

2

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GMHut View Post


    I just hope it offers proper English (American) ;-)



    Seriously Brits,



    Why the hell did you guys stick with this crazy F'd up spelling structure. I mean common, if it weren't possible to spell things like the "f" sound with "augh" and "ph" and equally ridiculous things and have it still be "proper" English we probably wouldn't need auto-correct spelling features ;-)



    Perhaps it's the same reason Americans didn't choose to adopt the metric system.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BB Sting View Post


    I actually think the American way of spelling is quite flawed. They took perfectly good words, like centre, or cheque, and gave them totally bizarre spellings, center, and check, when their was nothing at all wrong with the original way of spelling them. And if every word looked just how it sounded, we would have a very confused language indeed. Imagine if one was spelled won, or if two was spelled too.



    The American system of spelling makes more sense. Words like catergorize, z instead of an s, are spelt like there pronounced. English though is a stupid language. No one letter has the same sound corresponding to it. Look at the 'a' in the following words. Father, dad, dame, call, village, many. There are six different ways of pronouncing 'a'
  • Reply 22 of 53
    allblueallblue Posts: 393member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ninja_Monkey View Post


    The American system of spelling makes more sense. Words like catergorize, z instead of an s, are spelt like there pronounced. English though is a stupid language. No one letter has the same sound corresponding to it. Look at the 'a' in the following words. Father, dad, dame, call, village, many. There are six different ways of pronouncing 'a'



    English is such a hybrid language that it is not at all phonetic. 'Center' may be more phonetic than 'centre', but the -re ending is a legacy of French elements in the language. To arbitrarily change some words, as happened in post-independence America, without overhauling and standardising the whole caboodle doesn't make a lot of sense either.



    You did not pick a very good example with 'categorise'. How do you pronounce 'rise'? My favourite confuse-a-foreigner-trying-to-learn-English anomaly is the suffix '-ough'. Four letters, six (count 'em) different pronunciations:



    off as in cough

    uff as in rough

    ow as in bough

    oh as in though

    oo as in through

    uh as in thorough



    Still, at least verbs are easy and nouns are not gender specific!
  • Reply 23 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nagromme View Post


    You probably already know, but you can tap the auto-correction bubble to cancel it, saving you from having to edit it to be what you want.



    I find I almost NEVER cancel the auto-correction. It's right 99.9% of the time, and a huge time-saver. But I can imagine that during the entry of lots of proper nouns you'd want to turn off the auto-correction entirely.





    Yep. So that's another thing I have to do each time. Pain in the ass. And sometimes I am not looking at the word, but rather at the keys, thus missing that it had just "corrected" the word for me. So...I get to backspace the entire word and start over again. Again, pain in the ass.
  • Reply 24 of 53
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,951member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nagromme View Post


    I wonder if "text replacement" means you can create a user-defined list of shorthand: like typing 'mas' and hitting the space bar could enter 'Massachusetts.' You could use that to quickly type long names or technical terms in your field... or to convert habitual txt-speak into real English





    I think people call that feature TextExpander. It's third party, but it works great.





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nagromme View Post


    You probably already know, but you can tap the auto-correction bubble to cancel it, saving you from having to edit it to be what you want.



    I find I almost NEVER cancel the auto-correction. It's right 99.9% of the time, and a huge time-saver. But I can imagine that during the entry of lots of proper nouns you'd want to turn off the auto-correction entirely.





    That's nice, but your experience doesn't help me at all, my experience is the exact opposite. As far as I can tell, it's not self-learning, not extendable and it has too limited of a stock vocabulary. I don't want it and wish I can just turn it off without having to edit some oddball plist somewhere. Having to tap the bubble really takes me out of rhythm.
  • Reply 25 of 53
    irelandireland Posts: 17,779member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hattig View Post


    It'd be nice to actually see the screenshots.



    Well, I was kind of thinking that. Those links were like April fools jokes.



    Quote:

    Auto-correction.



    Mac touch FTW?
  • Reply 26 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by allblue View Post


    My favourite confuse-a-foreigner-trying-to-learn-English anomaly is the suffix '-ough'. Four letters, six (count 'em) different pronunciations



    You forgot "hiccough".
  • Reply 27 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by allblue View Post


    English is such a hybrid language that it is not at all phonetic. 'Center' may be more phonetic than 'centre', but the -re ending is a legacy of French elements in the language. To arbitrarily change some words, as happened in post-independence America, without overhauling and standardising the whole caboodle doesn't make a lot of sense either.



    You did not pick a very good example with 'categorise'. How do you pronounce 'rise'? My favourite confuse-a-foreigner-trying-to-learn-English anomaly is the suffix '-ough'. Four letters, six (count 'em) different pronunciations:



    off as in cough

    uff as in rough

    ow as in bough

    oh as in though

    oo as in through

    uh as in thorough



    Still, at least verbs are easy and nouns are not gender specific!



    The point I was trying to make with catergorise is the US spelling is spelt phonetically correct. ie Z as in zoolander where as in British english it's an s as in snake. You don't say cat-er-gor-size. So in this case the US spelling just makes more sense.



    You can also have the opposite problem with your example too. You have words with the sme spelling at the end but different vowels. Where as the words



    to

    too

    two

    through

    threw

    clue

    shoe



    have the same vowel at the end but are spelt differently.



    Other problems with the spelling of english.

    Sometimes a combination of letters represents a single sound. 'sh' for example

    Or one letter represents two sounds. ie x in box. Box ends in a k then an s sound at the end of it. And silent letters. gnaw, knife, debt, island.
  • Reply 28 of 53
    Apple needs to make the equivalent of a "Genius" spelling and grammar checker. One that constantly updates over the web and seeks out the most acceptable corrections.
  • Reply 29 of 53
    You have missed one point with this news!!



    I am 99% certain, the main reason for Apple to include iphone like typing in Leopard is this long awaited Apple Tablet or whatever you want to call it!

    great, the time is near
  • Reply 30 of 53
    allblueallblue Posts: 393member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nospamboz View Post


    You forgot "hiccough".



    Of course! Thanks!



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ninja_Monkey View Post




    You can also have the opposite problem with your example too. You have words with the sme spelling at the end but different vowels. Where as the words



    to

    too

    two

    through

    threw

    clue

    shoe



    have the same vowel at the end but are spelt differently.



    Not forgetting 'you'!
  • Reply 31 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by allblue View Post


    Of course! Thanks!







    Not forgetting 'you'!



    Of course, how foolish of me.
  • Reply 32 of 53
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by allblue View Post


    English is such a hybrid language that it is not at all phonetic. 'Center' may be more phonetic than 'centre', but the -re ending is a legacy of French elements in the language.



    Which is yet one more reason to prefer 'center' over 'centre'.
  • Reply 34 of 53
    allblueallblue Posts: 393member
    Hi Ninja!



    What you see as a flaw this guy sees as a strength. From the BBC site today:



    "Eunoia is the shortest word in English containing all five vowels - and it means "beautiful thinking". It is also the title of Canadian poet Christian Bok's book of fiction in which each chapter uses only one vowel.



    Mr Bok believes his book proves that each vowel has its own personality, and demonstrates the flexibility of the English language."




    Full story here:



    http://news.bbc.co.uk/today/hi/today...00/7697762.stm



    PS Apologies for turning this thread into linguistic larrikinism...
  • Reply 35 of 53
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


    I don't want it and wish I can just turn it off without having to edit some oddball plist somewhere. Having to tap the bubble really takes me out of rhythm.



    I doubt it will work the same way on Mac as it currently does on an iPhone. Typists who don't even look at the screen when they are entering text would find it quite annoying - for example reading from a printed or handwritten document that you are retyping. You wouldn't even know that the words were being 'corrected' for you every time you hit the space bar.



    The iPhone is pretty much a hunt and peck style of typing so it is more obvious that the words are being corrected and helps speed up the otherwise tedious input method, but I still find it annoying. I prefer the way it currently works on Mac - just underline them in red. Text auto-correction seems so Microsoft-like. If I want help I'd rather just go to the help menu. I generally dislike anything that is supposed to be automatic.
  • Reply 36 of 53
    gongon Posts: 2,437member
    The very first Snow Leopard feature I hear of is a negative one? Way to go.
  • Reply 37 of 53
    gongon Posts: 2,437member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Inkling View Post


    These new features are either a nuisance (autocorrect) or trivial (m-dashes). The text editing features that Snow Leopard actually needs include these:



    * Styled text much like you will find any good word processor. Styled text lets you create and name paragraph and text styles that can be applied to text. Change the style definition and all the text assigned that style changes. And exported text should include the style tags. The lack of true text styles is why TextEdit looks and functions like a clone of WordStar from the early 1980s complete with a ruler bar.



    If the name is to be trusted, TextEdit is primarily a text editor. That's totally different from a word processor.



    If anything, I think Apple should strip all the rich text viewing/editing out of TextEdit. Being loaded with the rich text features makes it a clumsy, confused, bad-UI text editor. Those features rightly belong in a separate app. Microsoft has had this thing right since Windows 3.0 (Notepad/Write).



    The separate RTF app would certainly be improved with addition of styles and tables, but if you are a heavy enough user to bother with those, you are *very* fast approaching a point where you should just grab a real word processor from Apple/Redlex/Microsoft/OpenOffice.org/Abisource/etc. Why would Apple eat its own sales? Should operating systems come with everything and the kitchen sink?



    Maybe the solution would be for Apple to ship Pages in its default software package alongside iLife. I imagine Keynote and Numbers, as well as Pages upgrades, would still sell iWork to most people who currently buy it.
  • Reply 38 of 53
    Hello allblue,



    That was perhaps the most bizarre thing I've ever read. I just think there is a flaw in the way English is written. The same letters can correspond to different vowels. Two letters grouped together make one sound 'sh'.



    Languages that make more sense in the way their written, for me at least, are languages like Spanish or Turkish. There easier to learn. Each letter has it's own sound and it doesn't change. Words are pronounced the way their written. Simple.
  • Reply 39 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gon View Post


    If the name is to be trusted, TextEdit is primarily a text editor. That's totally different from a word processor.



    If anything, I think Apple should strip all the rich text viewing/editing out of TextEdit. Being loaded with the rich text features makes it a clumsy, confused, bad-UI text editor. Those features rightly belong in a separate app. Microsoft has had this thing right since Windows 3.0 (Notepad/Write).



    The separate RTF app would certainly be improved with addition of styles and tables, but if you are a heavy enough user to bother with those, you are *very* fast approaching a point where you should just grab a real word processor from Apple/Redlex/Microsoft/OpenOffice.org/Abisource/etc. Why would Apple eat its own sales? Should operating systems come with everything and the kitchen sink?



    Maybe the solution would be for Apple to ship Pages in its default software package alongside iLife. I imagine Keynote and Numbers, as well as Pages upgrades, would still sell iWork to most people who currently buy it.



    Horses***! TextEdit.app is an application that is a gateway for Development. It was developed as an Openstep replacement to Edit.app by Mike Ferris and Ali Ozer of AppKit.



    Rich Text has been a baseline of NeXT from it's inception. Even the most basic of applications can easily get Rich Text [RTF/RTFD] built-in with practically NO CODE.



    Stick with Notepad if that's what turns your crank. The developer extensions you can add to TextEdit.app allow it to be an HTML TextEditor, or not.



    The Application is a basic Rich Text Editor that was used with NeXTMail.app in a manner that it only take a minute amount of code to provide a rich text editor to then be leveraged inside a MIME complaint Rich Text enabled Mail Client.
  • Reply 40 of 53
    The spell correction on the iPhone is a fuckin' disaster. You can't turn it off and it works backwards anyway. It should let me type as I want to and if I want to accept the spelling change, then I should have to tap the pop up bubble to accept the change. Now it decides for me if I just keep typing. I know what the fuck I want to type and I don't need that piece of shit spell correction changing shit around on me.
Sign In or Register to comment.