Dell's iPhone Killer rejected by carriers as too dull

2

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 50
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    As pointed out on another thread, if a 3rd-party thinks there is a market for a really nice digital camera for the iPhone they can make one that connects to the iPhone. It would be big and ugly for to have a 1" lens with 10Mpx attached but to some this might be a good thing.



    The iPod attachments became obscene with so many pointless items. Now we'll have a real OS using that connector. I think the business sector will see a huge boost in this area, not just consumer. Those PoS devices are pretty poor devices for the price. I would think that the major companies have already seen the potential of creating a PoS CC reader and SW. Or an IR scanner or whatever. For longevity on WiFi you are fine for a day, unless the attachment needs plenty of power. If so then a built in battery pack.



    I look forward to the strange devices that will be coming.iPod dock toiletpaper holders need not apply.



    I can't wait till it can make a decent cup of coffee.
  • Reply 22 of 50
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Fast Fred 1 View Post


    I can't wait till it can make a decent cup of coffee.



    Actually, there is at least one kitchen appliance, a refrigerator, that has a dock for an iPod. While that product is quite lame I can see the potential for setting a coffee maker timer or having it ring you when your coffee is ready via WiFi or BT. Still pretty lame, but less lame than a fridge with a dock.



    I think the BT APIs will come in very handy in the most unique ways this year.
  • Reply 23 of 50
    I think the iTouch platform might just eliminate all competition in the consumer space with the hardware extensions.



    Its truly a mobile PC now with the ability to add other devices to it (kinda like how computers can have printers, speakers, etc...). One idea that comes to mind immediately (and ties in with the new iLife) is geotagging. I can absolutely see camera makers adding the ability to geotag photos by communicating with the iphone through bluetooth. It sends the iphone a message to detect coordinates and message them back (or store them, so they can be linked to the photos on the PC).



    This could possibly be achieved on current cameras through a tiny bluetooth extension possibly (not sure if thats possible...).
  • Reply 24 of 50
    res08haores08hao Posts: 114member
    The only suits more clueless than microsoft would be Dell. They have no concept of innovation and their track record of customer service is abysmal. I own two dell laptops and they are by far the worst computers I have ever owned, including my gateway 286 4mg C:/ prompt suitcase sized first one. Dell is joined to the hip with microsoft. They both deserve to go down together.
  • Reply 25 of 50
    rot'napplerot'napple Posts: 1,839member
    "Dell's iPhone Killer rejected by carriers as too dull", couldn't you have ended that as 'too Dell'?



    "Too dull" or 'too Dell', what's the dif?
  • Reply 26 of 50
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,951member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by NOFEER View Post


    enterprise had the blackberry

    THE BUZZ for smartphones from consumers and thus "in" enterprise was

    APPLE AND THE IPHONE they created the buzz, before iphone there was just free phones with limited internet that was fine for very limited view of the web,

    IPHONE and apple UI made usable smartphones



    There were smartphones before the iphone, and I don't recall any of them being free, they were at least $200 with contract where I am. Or are you talking about phones in general from a consumer perspective?
  • Reply 27 of 50
    inkswampinkswamp Posts: 337member
    As a long-time Mac user, I have to say it's interesting to watch this kind of thing happen. And it keep repeating. Dell isn't the first company with a lot of muscle in the tech market to fail when trying to match Apple. It has happened a lot with the iPhone and the iPod and the Mac as well.



    Back when Jobs returned to Apple in the late 90s, the biggest complaint about Apple was that they "made the whole widget." Industry know-it-alls used to gripe that Apple's insistence on making most of the machines (hardware/engineering, the OS, software, design, etc.) was what kept Apple so weak. I remember Jobs telling MacAddict in a brief interview back then that making the whole widget was actually Apple's strong point and they would soon start exploiting it.



    Flash ahead. Suddenly, would-be competitors with Apple in music and smart phones are having an unexpectedly hard time keeping up because they don't know how to make the whole widget and therefore can only produce products that are half-assed attempts, maybe good in some ways but always coming up short in some key element. Dell should know better. Remember Dell's music player? Yeah... neither do I.



    There's something perversely amusing about seeing Apple's "greatest weakness" turned around to be the very thing that nobody can compete with.
  • Reply 28 of 50
    hittrj01hittrj01 Posts: 753member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post


    "Dell's iPhone Killer rejected by carriers as too dull", couldn't you have ended that as 'too Dell'?



    "Too dull" or 'too Dell', what's the dif?



    I'll take it a step further and say you didn't even need to read the whole headline. I got as far as "Dell's iPhone Killer..." before I knew it couldn't end well. Dell has never once in the history of their existence made an enticing piece of equipment. Dell's claim to fame is making cheaply constructed devices with absolutely nothing to excite you.... Wait a minute, am I talking about Dell or WinMo phones? \
  • Reply 29 of 50
    thepixeldocthepixeldoc Posts: 2,257member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by melgross View Post


    Yes. That's part of the idea.



    In order to bring that to fruition, the new BT, WiFi, and particularly the Dock Connector must be involved. OS 3 is finally doing that, and filling the last pieces of the puzzle in.



    I agree that the healthcare industry will probably be the largest benefactor of this new tech. The missing piece of the puzzle for me is the iPhone Jumbo or iNet Book, based on the same software as the iPhone.



    I envision something about the size of a paperback, less then a centimeter (1/2") thick, that can also make use of resolution independence. For older folks, a huge plus since many have eyesight problems (icons bigger). With chat… and the new connector, doctors and healthcare pros could monitor all functions from a distance... and be able to talk directly with the patient, as well as send and monitor on-time diagnosis, medicine, whatever. Third-party manu's could also make rubber holders, with large handles, etc., so that the truly aged wouldn't have a hard time holding it, or if dropped, wouldn't break it.



    The cost saving... and life-saving potential would be HUGE!



    PS: it is just something of this magnitude, that could justify the govt. building out broadband country-wide, and mandating through new Healthcare reform, that it be put to use.



    Exciting times we live in... coming from Apple. Who woulda guessed this 3 years ago, that I'd be writing about this potential future, on an APPLE site
  • Reply 30 of 50
    nondualnondual Posts: 78member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post


    I agree that the healthcare industry will probably be the largest benefactor of this new tech. The missing piece of the puzzle for me is the iPhone Jumbo or iNet Book, based on the same software as the iPhone.



    I envision something about the size of a paperback, less then a centimeter (1/2") thick, that can also make use of resolution independence. For older folks, a huge plus since many have eyesight problems (icons bigger). With chat… and the new connector, doctors and healthcare pros could monitor all functions from a distance... and be able to talk directly with the patient, as well as send and monitor on-time diagnosis, medicine, whatever. Third-party manu's could also make rubber holders, with large handles, etc., so that the truly aged wouldn't have a hard time holding it, or if dropped, wouldn't break it.



    This sounds like a Kindle 2.0 with a touchscreen and the iPhone OS. I'm an RN, and my dream would be a machine with a 'chart by exception' charting system and a bluetooth that could grab vitals off an in-room machine and grab telemetry off a bluetooth telemetry box.
  • Reply 31 of 50
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,756member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by inkswamp View Post


    As a long-time Mac user, I have to say it's interesting to watch this kind of thing happen. And it keep repeating. Dell isn't the first company with a lot of muscle in the tech market to fail when trying to match Apple. It has happened a lot with the iPhone and the iPod and the Mac as well.



    Back when Jobs returned to Apple in the late 90s, the biggest complaint about Apple was that they "made the whole widget." Industry know-it-alls used to gripe that Apple's insistence on making most of the machines (hardware/engineering, the OS, software, design, etc.) was what kept Apple so weak. I remember Jobs telling MacAddict in a brief interview back then that making the whole widget was actually Apple's strong point and they would soon start exploiting it.



    Flash ahead. Suddenly, would-be competitors with Apple in music and smart phones are having an unexpectedly hard time keeping up because they don't know how to make the whole widget and therefore can only produce products that are half-assed attempts, maybe good in some ways but always coming up short in some key element. Dell should know better. Remember Dell's music player? Yeah... neither do I.



    There's something perversely amusing about seeing Apple's "greatest weakness" turned around to be the very thing that nobody can compete with.



    This post encapsulates the "big picture" very nicely.



    The main reason I chose Apple and stick with them is precisely because they "make the whole widget."



    At the time, SJ knew something the rest of the industry didn't and just couldn't "get." The same thing is true today. The industry just doesn't "get" it. The people saying we just pay more for a logo, just don't "get" it. And many of these people are the same ones who will eventually go out and buy Macs and other Apple products themselves.



    The kind of jealousy felt/displayed by the competition and its users, especially Steve Ballmer - who just can't stop talking about Apple - is palpable. It's just so apparent.



    The solution available to this half-asleep industry is simple, though: start giving a shit about the products that come out your door. Start putting time and energy into creating a "user experience." Don't load up a product with features at the expense of the simplicity (and hopefully beauty) of the interface. Make it a seamless out-of-the-box experience. Understand that people would rather get work done and get on with their lives than tinker and go through a learning process. Don't let third parties screw with your product, etc., etc.



    The examples are legion. It's obvious, though, that very, very few outside Cupertino are getting the message.
  • Reply 32 of 50
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,323member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post


    I agree that the healthcare industry will probably be the largest benefactor of this new tech. The missing piece of the puzzle for me is the iPhone Jumbo or iNet Book, based on the same software as the iPhone.



    I envision something about the size of a paperback, less then a centimeter (1/2") thick, that can also make use of resolution independence. For older folks, a huge plus since many have eyesight problems (icons bigger). With chat? and the new connector, doctors and healthcare pros could monitor all functions from a distance... and be able to talk directly with the patient, as well as send and monitor on-time diagnosis, medicine, whatever. Third-party manu's could also make rubber holders, with large handles, etc., so that the truly aged wouldn't have a hard time holding it, or if dropped, wouldn't break it.



    The cost saving... and life-saving potential would be HUGE!



    PS: it is just something of this magnitude, that could justify the govt. building out broadband country-wide, and mandating through new Healthcare reform, that it be put to use.



    Exciting times we live in... coming from Apple. Who woulda guessed this 3 years ago, that I'd be writing about this potential future, on an APPLE site



    Yes, I really do see this. I just hope Apple sees the broader potential than just an iP/iT sized device. I surely hope the info we're getting from normally reliable sources about Apple buying 10" screens is true.
  • Reply 33 of 50
    ghostface147ghostface147 Posts: 1,629member
    Ha ha Dell
  • Reply 34 of 50
    johnqhjohnqh Posts: 242member
    To me, it is interesting why anyone would try to make an iPhone Killer.



    Among the five/six Smartphone platforms, iPhone is clearly ahead. All the other four have clear weakness.



    Before you want to be the "iPhone killer", you should try to be the #2 first. Instead of trying to copy iPhone, the right strategy is to compete against other platforms - try to create "Blackberry Killer" or "Android Killer" is way easier.



    The correct strategy for Windows Mobile is to try to be Blackberry Killer. Microsoft certainly has the expertise to create an enterprise email solution for WM, and Blackberry is pretty weak in all other areas. Android, on the other hand, should try to be the Symbian killer. I am not so sure that Palm Pre will be the magic bullet for Palm.
  • Reply 35 of 50
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,323member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by johnqh View Post


    To me, it is interesting why anyone would try to make an iPhone Killer.



    Among the five/six Smartphone platforms, iPhone is clearly ahead. All the other four have clear weakness.



    Before you want to be the "iPhone killer", you should try to be the #2 first. Instead of trying to copy iPhone, the right strategy is to compete against other platforms - try to create "Blackberry Killer" or "Android Killer" is way easier.



    The correct strategy for Windows Mobile is to try to be Blackberry Killer. Microsoft certainly has the expertise to create an enterprise email solution for WM, and Blackberry is pretty weak in all other areas. Android, on the other hand, should try to be the Symbian killer. I am not so sure that Palm Pre will be the magic bullet for Palm.



    A Blackberry killer will be the toughest. They have very strong business expertise. In addition, their servers and backoffice is considered to be essential to many.



    The weaker OS's right now are Win Mobile, Symbian, the older Palm, and possibly Palms WEBos, as it's not even here, and has no software yet. Palm, by far, is the weakest company as well.
  • Reply 36 of 50
    johnqhjohnqh Posts: 242member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by melgross View Post


    A Blackberry killer will be the toughest. They have very strong business expertise. In addition, their servers and backoffice is considered to be essential to many.



    The weaker OS's right now are Win Mobile, Symbian, the older Palm, and possibly Palms WEBos, as it's not even here, and has no software yet. Palm, by far, is the weakest company as well.



    Blackberry's strength is also its weakness. Microsoft and Google have the expertise to be a strong competitor with server and backoffice if they want to, and it is a clear target.



    iPhone is the toughest target because it involves thousands of details which sum up as the "user experience", including how things zoom, animation, icon design, rotation etc. Dell and Microsoft won't even know what that means.



    I consider the old Palm OS already dead, and I don't think Palm will survive 2 years from now.



    I don't think WM is the weakest. I have a Blackberry Pearl, a WM (T-Mobile SDA, although it is kind of old) and Android. On user experience, Android > WM > Blackberry. On developer support, WM > Android > Blackberry.
  • Reply 37 of 50
    akhomerunakhomerun Posts: 386member
    From the article:

    Quote:

    Dell's failure to successfully step from the commodity PC business into the mobile handset market should come as no surprise, as smartphones requires expertise in software platform development, consumer design savvy, and portable device engineering, all things Dell has never demonstrated any proficiency in.



    Statements like this ruin great AppleInsider articles, in my opinion. The Dell DJ worked well and sold well until Dell simply didn't keep the player up to date. Dell's Pocket PCs were well designed and reasonably popular at the time. And many of Dell's PCs demonstrate great portable device engineering and consumer design saavy, see their mini 9 netbooks (is that what they are called? i forget and dont feel like looking it up)



    Dell is a successful company and I would argue that they have put out a more consistent product line over the years than Apple considering Apple's history in the 90s.



    Not to say I'm not an Apple fan, and I would definitely say that I'm not at all surprised at Dell making a lame smartphone. I guess a little bias isn't a terrible thing in a site for Apple fans, it's always fun to poke around at competition when they are stumbling around
  • Reply 38 of 50
    bloggerblogbloggerblog Posts: 2,312member
    Michael Dell should shut Dell down and give the money back to the shareholders.



    I couldn't help it... sorry!
  • Reply 39 of 50
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,505member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Fast Fred 1 View Post


    I can't wait till it can make a decent cup of coffee.



    LOL, I don't doubt it will once a smart coffee maker puts in some wi-fi and an app for the iPhone store.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bloggerblog View Post


    Michael Dell should shut Dell down and give the money back to the shareholders.



    I couldn't help it... sorry!



    Yup, while there is something left to give!



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Roos24 View Post


    My short observation is that Apple's timing, whether smart or lucky, could not have been better.



    Jan



    Right but I suspect had Apple only entered the market now the market would still be where it was before they did enter if you see what I mean, AKA 'Status Crud'



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by wobegon View Post


    Wow. Anyone else see what I'm seeing?



    The four major US mobile carriers are now rallying behind four very different smartphones, but with one glaring constant: none are running Windows Mobile. It's not necessarily a big surprise, but seriously, whenever WM 6.5 or WM 7 phones make it to market, who will care with alternatives like these?





    In a few years we will be saying that about computers too ... none of them will be running M$ OS.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post


    "Dell's iPhone Killer rejected by carriers as too dull", couldn't you have ended that as 'too Dell'?



    "Too dull" or 'too Dell', what's the dif?



    Michael Dull won't like that!
  • Reply 40 of 50
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,323member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by johnqh View Post


    Blackberry's strength is also its weakness. Microsoft and Google have the expertise to be a strong competitor with server and backoffice if they want to, and it is a clear target.



    iPhone is the toughest target because it involves thousands of details which sum up as the "user experience", including how things zoom, animation, icon design, rotation etc. Dell and Microsoft won't even know what that means.



    I consider the old Palm OS already dead, and I don't think Palm will survive 2 years from now.



    I don't think WM is the weakest. I have a Blackberry Pearl, a WM (T-Mobile SDA, although it is kind of old) and Android. On user experience, Android > WM > Blackberry. On developer support, WM > Android > Blackberry.



    RIM has specialized. It's not surprising they took the business world by storm. I'm not discounting it. Their backend security is second to none, which large business depend on. If apple ever can manage better security, they will become a better challenge, but not yet.
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