Demand for Apple's 13" MacBook Pro may be outpacing supply

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  • Reply 61 of 146
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by night9hawk View Post


    It's a tiny bit more difficult to upgrade than the old plastic MacBooks-I have upgraded the hard drive and memory on the unit since I picked it up last week.



    Just to be specific, the tiny bit more difficult is the removal of a few extra screws, but you already needed a screwdriver to change the HDD and RAM, anyway. Though I do miss the setup of the ploy-carb MBs that kept the screws in the metal plate after you removed it.



    How do you like the new trackpad? I did have to get mine repaired but overall it?s been great. The durability of the new body is worlds different from the old MBs so if you are rough on your tools, like me, it will be a nice change.
  • Reply 62 of 146
    davidtdavidt Posts: 112member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post


    Well I would think that the wireless antenna has improved recently, but there are other outside influences that can affect your Wi-Fi signal. If too many people are using the same channel, that could interfere. 2.4 Ghz devices could also interfere, so in reality, YMMV. I have had no Wi-Fi issues with my 2007 MBP in regards to signal strength. As far as buyer's remorse, I think you have 30 days to return the product if you are not happy with it.



    i agree, every new powerbook/macbook pro i have bought in the last years has had better wifi reception than the previous model. but of course it is impossible to guarantee that this will be the case with your computer... to many variables i suppose.
  • Reply 63 of 146
    davidtdavidt Posts: 112member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post


    Bottom line, everyone's definition of what a "Pro" should be is going to vary. How do you define pro?



    well, you've just answered your original question with the above statement and question.



    if you're a pro who needs a 17" screen --> the 13" will not suffice

    if you're a pro who needs a 13" screen -> the 13" will be right for you.



    does this answer your question?
  • Reply 64 of 146
    davidtdavidt Posts: 112member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    I know that holding down the Option key while clicking on the Airport icon in the Menu Bar will show signal strength in Snow Leopard but I am not sure that works in Leopard).





    yes, this works on Leopard too, just tried it,

    thanks for the tip, never knew that!
  • Reply 65 of 146
    gustavgustav Posts: 825member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Jerseymac View Post


    The glossy screen is a drawback. Try surfing in the back yard on a sunny day.



    Try it with a matte screen. Guess what - it sucks too.



    But if it's a sunny day, go get some exercise instead.
  • Reply 66 of 146
    dr millmossdr millmoss Posts: 5,403member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by faithfulFrank View Post


    I have one question NO ONE seems to be able to answer for me. If I buy this new 13" MacbookPro, will it pick up wifi signals from farther away then my 12" Powerbook? I really need it to.



    I think it's safe to say it will, if only because it uses 802.11n, which has a better range than the older protocols, and especially if you use it with an 802.11n router. Whether it will have the range you need is difficult to know.
  • Reply 67 of 146
    carmissimocarmissimo Posts: 837member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DocNo42 View Post


    By whatever equipment meets my actual requirements instead of relying on useless labels?



    Last time I checked, Apple offered choices other then the 13" so I really don't understand your complaint - other then you are one of these shallow people that feel your own computer is devalued if other "lesser" computers get to share the same silly label (i.e. "Pro")?



    Exactly. Apple is offering a choice.



    Based on the premise that some pros might need X, Y, or Z, one could argue that any computer that doesn't meet the needs of the most demanding pro customer out there should not be labelled a MacBook Pro. As such, it could be claimed the 15" Pro shouldn't be classified as a pro machine, especially in base form with a slower processor.



    And what of the 17" MacBook Pro sporting in base form a 5400 RPM drive? How could Apple call that machine a pro machine if there are pros out there who have to have at least a 7,200 RPM drive? And what's with that glossy screen? Apple's standards, clearly, are far too low if they dare to use the Pro label on that abomination.
  • Reply 68 of 146
    carmissimocarmissimo Posts: 837member
    I think it would interesting to find out what impact cheaper laptops are having on mac mini sales.



    I was planning to go with the mini until the latest laptops were introduced. Now that the price difference is so small, why would I bother with the mini when a laptop costing marginally more offers comparable performance.



    And the payoff for Apple is that once you start thinking laptop, it's very easy to consider moving up the food chain since a little more takes you to another performance level and a little more still that much more.



    Whereas I was thinking a maxed out mini that here in Canada retails for $1,318. looking at the laptops, I'd be leaning more to a macbook pro 13" which, speced out to what I want retails for $1,912. More money, sure, but also more computer, including a faster processor.



    Apple could do something similar with the mini by expanding options but I don't think Apple wants to devote more than a minimal amount of engineering effort on the mini because it isn't as big a seller as any of the laptops.



    In short, maybe some of what's going on with the popularity of the new laptops is that some customers that would have opted for a mini are going laptop instead. If I'm right, the mini is going to be the big loser in this process and might even be killed off.
  • Reply 69 of 146
    davidtdavidt Posts: 112member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Carmissimo View Post


    Apple's standards, clearly, are far too low if they dare to use the Pro label on that abomination.



    You are of course correct, but spare a thought for those Silicon Graphics users who bought the SGI-Virtu - cost: about $11,000 - and expect to have a PRO machine - only to find it has only 2 USB ports. disgraceful!
  • Reply 70 of 146
    dreamrajdreamraj Posts: 83member
    Yesterday, I ordered the 17" MBP - FULLY LOADED!!



    * 3.06GHz

    * 8GB SDRAM

    * 500GB @ 7200 rpm

    * Antiglare Widescreen Display

    * DisplayPort to DVI Adapter

    * Mini DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI Adapter

    * Apple MagSafe Airline Power Adapter

    * Apple Remote

    * AppleCare Protection Plan



    Can't wait!! Also looking for a used 30" cinema display. I see some for $700-800 on eBay.



    I do Web design and am getting serious about Final Cut Studio and After Effects. Anybody else on the same boat?
  • Reply 71 of 146
    rickagrickag Posts: 1,626member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Apple's newly-coined 13-inch MacBook Pros appear to be off to a hot start, with the company reportedly having difficulty keeping some of the new models in stock as it enters the heart of the back-to-school buying season........

    .......

    "We see this as a sign that demand is outpacing the company's build expectations, and it may take several weeks to reach a supply demand equilibrium," he told clients.

    .........



    Well duh! Took Apple awhile to figure it out. Maybe they learned something. This even though the 13" has a battery that isn't user replaceable and has a SD card reader rather than an express card slot. I attribute this almost solely to adding Firewire back and pricing it well.
  • Reply 72 of 146
    davidtdavidt Posts: 112member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rickag View Post


    I attribute this almost solely to adding Firewire back and pricing it well.



    Just out of curiosity: is there a resource where we can find out how many computer owners use various aspects of their machine? eg. i wonder how many people actually use firewire? I and a few of my friends do (mostly musicians and video people). but the majority of my acquaintances who own MBPs or Powerbooks never, ever used the firewire port. They just don't need it. Since the port has reappeared, I presume apple learned that there is demand, but I wonder how many percent of owners actually require a firewire port.

    Same goes for the expresscard slot.
  • Reply 73 of 146
    knownikkoknownikko Posts: 29member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post


    And tell me how it is narrow and slanted?



    Simple. You're hung up on a name and think that because what you consider to be "professional" excludes a small, easily portable screen, it should not carry the label you obviously place a lot of value in.

    Quote:

    You are narrow and slanted for perhaps not being able to understand that the needs of many mobile professionals are greater than what a 13 inch laptop can offer.



    Uhh, good for them. Since they're "professionals" and all, I fully trust in their ability to purchase a computer that meets their needs and not "sticker shop" based on what has the word "pro" stuck to it.

    Quote:

    The internals may be the similar, but there is a high number of people who need the biggest screen real estate they can get for many reasons.



    Good for them. Sure is nice that Apple makes a product that suits their needs. Are these the only people that can be considered "professionals" in your narrow and slanted view (and therefore worthy of purchasing a "pro" laptop)?

    Quote:

    Bottom line, everyone's definition of what a "Pro" should be is going to vary.



    Thank you for proving my point. So what, again, is your basis for excluding a product based on your narrow interpretation?

    Quote:

    How do you define pro?



    I would say it's got a lot to do with the quality of materials and workmanship and absolutely nothing to do with what the person using the machine regards themselves as. Lots of "pros" (myself included) need a light, easily portable system with superior battery life, a quality display, and a build quality that will withstand years of being carried around every single day.





    Every person I've seen griping about the "13" pro" has been someone who paid a heck of a lot more money for a 15" or 17" and are really just bent that others can now get into their exclusive club for a lot cheaper. I find that silly.
  • Reply 74 of 146
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by macmatte View Post


    This argument below is an excerpt taken from http://macmatte.wordpress.com where the raw poll data is found.



    Most online polls show that 40% prefer matte, but 20% would still buy glossy if forced to do so. This means that 20% of past Apple users refuse to buy glossy Macs.



    In other words, Apple?s figures could have been better, if the matte option had been there. Example: if Apple?s profits increased to $6 billion, when it might have increased to $7.2 million ? the glossy people argue the increase to $6 billion proves everyone loves glossy ? whereas, the matte crowd argue it could have instead been $7.2 billion in higher sales, if not for the people turned away because of all-glossy screens.



    Where do I get the hypothetical increase from $6 billion to $7.2 billion potential? At comment No. 88 below, the polls indicate that close to 20% will not buy Macs with glossy screens ? this includes people like myself who outright refuse, and also those who did buy glossy but later regretted it. Therefore, $6 billion x 1.2 = $7.2 billion. (Of course this is just a rough calculation for the sake of argument, and I haven?t factored in what percentage of Apple?s sales are made up of Macs.)



    That's all faulty logic. Only people who dislike glossy screens are going to go to that web site. So, 80% of even that biased sample would still buy a system with a glossy screen.



    Your premise assumes that Apple is incredibly stupid. Apple knows how many people bought computers with each screen option. If the matte option was a large seller, would Apple have dropped it?



    The glossy screen is brighter, clearer, less expensive, and more colorful. Its one downside (glare) can be addressed by slightly moving the screen. I've never found glare to be a problem on my MBP.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by faithfulFrank View Post


    I have one question NO ONE seems to be able to answer for me. If I buy this new 13" MacbookPro, will it pick up wifi signals from farther away then my 12" Powerbook? I really need it to.



    Also, I'll need to buy a new laptop backpack for this new laptop, but every one I've seen is for a 15" laptop or bigger. does ANYONE make a backpack just for this size laptop??



    Yes, the new one will have better wireless performance, although you'll want to make sure you have an 802.11n router. Even if you stick with the older router, I believe your model of MacBook was one of the ones with poor wireless reception.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post


    I am I the only who feels that a 13 inch laptop should not be a Pro laptop?



    No. There are 3 more people out there who believe that. Fortunately, Apple ignored them.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dreamraj View Post


    Yesterday, I ordered the 17" MBP - FULLY LOADED!!



    * 3.06GHz

    * 8GB SDRAM

    * 500GB @ 7200 rpm

    * Antiglare Widescreen Display

    * DisplayPort to DVI Adapter

    * Mini DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI Adapter

    * Apple MagSafe Airline Power Adapter

    * Apple Remote

    * AppleCare Protection Plan



    Can't wait!! Also looking for a used 30" cinema display. I see some for $700-800 on eBay.



    Screens are one thing that I generally don't buy from Apple. WHile I'm willing to pay a premium for the computer, I won't pay a premium for the screen. You can probably find a third party screen with equal or better specs for a lot less money. Heck, I know it's heresy, but I've even bought Dell monitors for my Mac. I don't know if it's still true, but at one time, the Dell monitor was at least as good as the Apple monitor - and about 1/3 the price (on sale).
  • Reply 75 of 146
    rickagrickag Posts: 1,626member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by davidT View Post


    Just out of curiosity: is there a resource where we can find out how many computer owners use various aspects of their machine? eg. i wonder how many people actually use firewire? I and a few of my friends do (mostly musicians and video people). but the majority of my acquaintances who own MBPs or Powerbooks never, ever used the firewire port. They just don't need it. Since the port has reappeared, I presume apple learned that there is demand, but I wonder how many percent of owners actually require a firewire port.

    Same goes for the expresscard slot.



    Anyone that has a camcorder requiring a firewire port(there were millions sold and are still being sold, me being one), anyone who foolishly (like me) bought firewire external harddrives to speed up data transfer while doing home video editing(even home video editing is more pleasant when it's faster), rather than using the internal slower laptop harddrive. Anyone who has to trouble shoot their daughter's laptop when she's home from college and needs to use target disc mode to salvage important papers, documents, etc. from her school work(and of course her iTunes purchases).



    I probably misspoke somewhat, as there are other very good reasons to like the new 13" Macbooks, but the recent lack of firewire touched off a firestorm on virtually every Mac centric website.
  • Reply 76 of 146
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 5,159member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by beastvince View Post


    What about the 250GB Hard Drive, try any of the MacBook Pro's with that hard drive and see what happens to the delivery. Delivery drops down to standard CTO time with any of the other drives. Ooops



    What I would do is get the standard drive and then buy your own SATA HD. The HD's are really, really easy to change in both the MacBook and MacBook Pro. Then you can even opt to get a 7200 RPM 250GB HD if you so wish. And it wouldn't cost you very much either. Wouldn't cost you anymore than $80 USD for a 7200RPM 250 GB notebook hard drive.



    You could put the standard drive in an external enclosure or just keep it in the box until you get read to sell it. Or just sell it.
  • Reply 77 of 146
    zandroszandros Posts: 537member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    LIthium-ion batteries actually go bad over time even if they are not used. So a replacement Li-ion battery for an old laptop is probably an old battery which was siting on the shelf until the day you bought it. As time goes on any replacement battery you buy will be worse than the previous one because they probably aren't manufacturing that style battery any longer and all available batteries were manufactured around the same time as the computer itself.



    Irrelevant. All Intel Mac notebooks have used lithium polymer batteries. Also, the style of battery used in the early 2006 Macbook Pro was manufactured at least until the Unibody notebooks were introduced.
  • Reply 78 of 146
    Thank you to both ghostface and beastvince for the good info.



    I appreciate the good help I read here.



    I do regular backups from my 12" powerbook to a WD portable harddrive that plugs into my 12" powerbook with a firewire connection. I planned on just using that to transfer to my new 13" macbookPro. Will that work?



    thanks.
  • Reply 79 of 146
    kenaustuskenaustus Posts: 914member
    No delivery problems for me. I ordered it 6/30. The "free" iPod touch arrived on Friday, the MacBook Pro yesterday and I'm waiting for the p"free" printer to be delivered today - Fed Ex's website says it's on the truck.



    The son-in-law got the touch and I get the 13" MBP as my wife has decided she wants the MB Air. And it is sweet!
  • Reply 80 of 146
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Zandros View Post


    Irrelevant. All Intel Mac notebooks have used lithium polymer batteries.



    Ok I was replying to someone who commented that the 2006 MBP batteries were failing. Just in case you were wondering, LI-poly is still LI-ion technology although the density and substrate is different. The aging issue is not documented as being any better to my knowledge. You do get more power because the density is greater.
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