10.2.2 out...

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 50
    leonisleonis Posts: 3,427member
    [quote]Originally posted by Matvei:

    <strong>



    I'm not installing this virus anymore. This is the last time I use that piece of [beautiful software engeneering].



    Is virex a friendly anti-virus? I mean does it install stupid extensions?



    mat</strong><hr></blockquote>





    At least Norton AV version 7.02 (not 7.0 which is a classic app) doesn't install extensions.
  • Reply 42 of 50
    FYI: Norton does install some stuff in /Library/StartupItems/
  • Reply 43 of 50
    i thought this update was supposed to reduce the occurances in ie where web pages dont completely display, i get them 4x more often now:/
  • Reply 44 of 50
    Can anyone please fill me in on this journaling-stuff. As told above, it seems to better handle directory-corruption, but how do you control the journaling. Eugene mentioned above that he tested a system with / without journaling: how do you do that ? Where/how do you enable/disable journaling? Is something like DriveX automatically using data from the journaling system when repairing a disc?
  • Reply 45 of 50
    zozo Posts: 3,115member
    nothing uses Journaling yet.. it just came out. So, previous disk utilities are useless.



    What I want to know also is what or how we can actually take advantage of it to retrieve data in case of a bad crash.



    To enable Journaling you can enable it via the Disk Utility application or via a command line. (in 10.2.2 and above only of course)
  • Reply 46 of 50
    [quote]Originally posted by The Pie Man:

    <strong>Ok so someone help me out here. I am totally baffled.



    I just updated to 10.2.2. and now mail.app and any browser I use won't connect to my mail server if I use the domain name of that server - it will only work if i use the IP address.



    If I keep my old settings of mail.server.com as my mail server it just times out, but the IP works. Also, if I go to my webmail server at <a href="http://mail.server.com"; target="_blank">http://mail.server.com</a>; it also times out (but the server is up and working fine on any other computer).



    So that would lead me to believe there is some kind of weird DNS resolution issue going on, but if go to the terminal and do a nslookup on mail.server.com it responds with the correct IP. So WTF is going on?



    Someone help me - this just ain't right!</strong><hr></blockquote>



    This is happening to me, too. I can't send or receive mail on my first-choice (ie free) isp. It seems to be isp-specific, which makes no sense at all.
  • Reply 47 of 50
    [quote]Originally posted by ZO:

    <strong>What I want to know also is what or how we can actually take advantage of it to retrieve data in case of a bad crash.

    </strong><hr></blockquote>



    Actually, that's not really what journalling is for. It's main goal is to prevent your filesystem from being left in an incoherent or corrupted state in case of a crash. Any writes that had not been commited when the crash occured are still lost, but at least you won't get any major file system incoherencies that could lead to data loss later on or in the worst case make the whole filesystem unusable.



    Bye,

    RazzFazz
  • Reply 48 of 50
    [quote]Originally posted by Hassan i Sabbah:

    <strong>



    This is happening to me, too. I can't send or receive mail on my first-choice (ie free) isp. It seems to be isp-specific, which makes no sense at all.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Now it doesn't like any isp I throw at it at all.
  • Reply 49 of 50
    [quote]Originally posted by RazzFazz:

    <strong>



    Actually, that's not really what journalling is for. It's main goal is to prevent your filesystem from being left in an incoherent or corrupted state in case of a crash. Any writes that had not been commited when the crash occured are still lost, but at least you won't get any major file system incoherencies that could lead to data loss later on or in the worst case make the whole filesystem unusable.



    Bye,

    RazzFazz</strong><hr></blockquote>



    To supplement the above well-written explanation, some of you may find the following documentation on meta-data consistency and various ways of addressing it (journaling vs. soft updates) to be a good read:



    <a href="http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/configtuning-disk.html"; target="_blank">http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/configtuning-disk.html</A>;



    (jump down to "6.10.2.1 More details about Soft Updates")



    Enjoy.
  • Reply 50 of 50
    [quote]Originally posted by crooked spoon:

    <strong>Can anyone please fill me in on this journaling-stuff. As told above, it seems to better handle directory-corruption, but how do you control the journaling. Eugene mentioned above that he tested a system with / without journaling: how do you do that ? Where/how do you enable/disable journaling? Is something like DriveX automatically using data from the journaling system when repairing a disc?</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Journalling means no more fsck.



    If you have to force quit your computer (or a power failure happens), fsck is what causes a huge delay on restart as the system manually checks every sector on your harddrive.



    Journalling keeps a logged transaction of the changes and knows which sectors have to be checked. So, after a system crash, the file system check is much, much quicker.
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