AT&T defends its iPhone network via YouTube outreach

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
AT&T has published a YouTube response to the mounting complaints about its network in order to explain the issues involved and assure subscribers that it is working hard to address the massive new demand related to iPhone use.



The video segment (shown below) introduces "Seth the blogger guy," who describes the explosive new growth in data demand over the last two years and outlines the investments AT&T has been making, including spending between $17 to $18 billion on upgrades scheduled for this year on top of the $38 billion invested over the past two years.



Standing in front of a picture of the iPhone, the AT&T spokesman says, "we're proud that we've enabled the smartphone revolution." At the end of the segment, he adds the assurance, "we have heard you, we are on it, and we will use this hard won experience to lead the industry into the future."



The segment also reiterates the previous announcement that AT&T's MMS service for the iPhone would become available later this month. "We've been working for months to prepare the radio access controllers in our network to support this launch. That means calibrating base stations all over the country, and frankly that's a very time-consuming process. MMS for the iPhone will be coming on September 25th. We wanted to make sure that when MMS for the iPhone launches, the experience was great. We wanted to get it right."





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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 210
    Well, you have 2 years from July 20th to sort it out... as I got my new contract with the 3GS launch.
  • Reply 2 of 210
    I still don't understand why MMS on the iPhone is more taxing on the network than every other cell phone. Are they just expecting an avalanche of unheard of proportions for iPhone MMS?



    Oh, and what about dropped calls?
  • Reply 3 of 210
    Oh please. I had AT&T when it was Cingular and had tons of dropped calls in the NYC, Northern NJ area. I switched to Verizon and the service was flawless. Never dropped a call. Being an Apple user, I have wanted the iPhone since it was introduced but have waited hoping there would be a Verizon version. With the introduction of the 3GS and no Verizon version, I made the switch being assured the network is much better. I have so many dropped calls and times I can't even get a signal it is ridiculous. I couldn't even get a signal on I-78 in a metro area. As soon as there is a Verizon version, I will gladly pay the early termination fee and be done with AT&T forever.
  • Reply 4 of 210
    What's with the head tilt? Maybe blogger-guy should be checked by a doctor for torticollis.
  • Reply 5 of 210
    Oh now your working on it? Don't use the excuse that their are just so many smartphone on your network and that they are straining your network so much. You had two years to prepare for this, don't act like this smartphone boom just surprised you. Look at Verizon and Sprint, you just being lazy, really lazy. Your finally investing in your network when it's past it's capacity. Nice job. And who the heck pushed for having smartphone on your network? You. You even require all smartphone users to have a data plan.
  • Reply 6 of 210
    I say good for them. What carrier company gives a rats ass to their customers. Apple has changed the status quo and AT&T had the guts to go with it. Give the guys some credit. At least they are working and trying to make it better. A few years ago your complaint goes in one ear and out the other, with a smidgen of laughter from the carriers during transit.
  • Reply 7 of 210
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by yensid98 View Post


    I still don't understand why MMS on the iPhone is more taxing on the network than every other cell phone. Are they just expecting an avalanche of unheard of proportions for iPhone MMS?



    I don't think that anyone can answer that question other than AT&T (and they have), but what other reason do you think they would have to delay accepting MMS fees from iPhone users?



    I don't think it's unreasonable to expect that iPhone usage of MMS will be more taxing than other phones. This article from the Financial Times says that Google sees 50 times more traffic from iPhones than from other phones.



    It could be argued that Verizon would have been able to take on the iPhone easily and enable MMS messaging immediately without a 3 month delay, but I'm not in a position to claim that, and I don't think it's necessarily true.
  • Reply 8 of 210
    I'm in Hoboken right on the waterfront and I just dropped another call. Keep working on it!
  • Reply 8 of 210
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Twigg View Post


    Oh now your working on it? Don't use the excuse that their are just so many smartphone on your network and that they are straining your network so much. You had two years to prepare for this, don't act like this smartphone boom just surprised you. Look at Verizon and Sprint, you just being lazy, really lazy. Your finally investing in your network when it's past it's capacity. Nice job. And who the heck pushed for having smartphone on your network? You. You even require all smartphone users to have a data plan.



    Really. If Verizon or Sprint took on the iPhone, their infrastructure would have imploded.
  • Reply 10 of 210
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by keeneye4obvious View Post


    Oh please. I had AT&T when it was Cingular and had tons of dropped calls in the NYC, Northern NJ area. I switched to Verizon and the service was flawless. Never dropped a call. Being an Apple user, I have wanted the iPhone since it was introduced but have waited hoping there would be a Verizon version. With the introduction of the 3GS and no Verizon version, I made the switch being assured the network is much better. I have so many dropped calls and times I can't even get a signal it is ridiculous. I couldn't even get a signal on I-78 in a metro area. As soon as there is a Verizon version, I will gladly pay the early termination fee and be done with AT&T forever.



    Just as a counter-example, I too had been waiting for the iPhone to make it to Verizon for 2 years having previously used AT&T and been dissatisfied with their service. With the release of the 3GS I finally gave in and switched to AT&T. And in fact, The service has been far better than I thought it would be. Although I live in Idaho in a suburban/rural area, I have excellent 3G speeds and coverage, although when you go into more rural areas, you generally end up on 2G EDGE, which isn't very fast.

    And while Verizon certainly has a wider 3G coverage area, It's pointless to even talk data usage on any other device. If you can't use an iPhone with Verizon's network, then WHAT GOOD IS IT? Literally, there isn't a phone that Verizon offers that can even begin to compare with the web browsing experience of the iPhone. And if you only need email access, then even 2G can cut it.
  • Reply 11 of 210
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by slapppy View Post


    I say good for them. What carrier company gives a rats ass to their customers. Apple has changed the status quo and AT&T had the guts to go with it. Give the guys some credit. At least they are working and trying to make it better. A few years ago your complaint goes in one ear and out the other, with a smidgen of laughter from the carriers during transit.



    I agree. The progress is slower than we might like or want, but it's still progress. And, after my travails with just about every major player in this industry over a two-decade period, I am ready to take whatever I can get.



    Bottom line, keep your expectations low: that way, all your surprises are positive! \
  • Reply 12 of 210
    To alleviate the burden on AT&T, who is working so hard for so long to enable their network to meet the level of iPhone users traffic...... open iPhone to other carriers. BTW, if AT&T's network cannot handle the load, why are they charging premium for services they cannot provide ?
  • Reply 13 of 210
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    I agree. The progress is slower than we might like or want, but it's still progress. And, after my travails with just about every major player in this industry over a two-decade period, I am ready to take whatever I can get.



    Bottom line, keep your expectations low: that way, all your surprises are positive! \



    You're right about lowering your expectations. Too many people have been expecting far too much relative to existing technology. Our service in the US is positively stone-age compared to South Korea, for example.
  • Reply 14 of 210
    aplnubaplnub Posts: 2,605member
    All I heard him say was that "our exclusive agreement with Apple and the iPhone is coming to an end and we are really nervous about it."
  • Reply 15 of 210
    rnp1rnp1 Posts: 175member
    "Hi my stage name is Seth. Im AFTRA. I got this gig cause I look like Steve Jobs with hair. Also NPR listeners like my ethic background. I took this gig very seriously. In fact, I didn't smile at all for 4 minutes. In fact, I look a little worried. But the director, who has produced many Miocrosoft ads, said I looked great.But unlike the real Steve Jobs, who loves his products, Im just hired and read from a cuecard, much like our President. Nothing actually gets done, but we justify it with press conferences and YouTube videos. So there is hope. Now, don't you feel bett........

    Sorry, lost service...I said....."
  • Reply 16 of 210
    I don't care what anyone says. Kudos to AT&T for thinking out of the box and using the social networking tools to hear and respond back. I don't think anyone would have been prepared for the amount of bandwidth that the iPhone has caused over the last few years. I think AT&T thought they had things under control but then realized that it was a paradigm shift for everyone. I don't think Verizon, much less anyone else would have handled the transition without issues, dropped calls, slow networks, etc. It was inevitable, the iPhone rewrote the rules. With that said, I'm kinda glad this happened on AT&T's watch because not only did they work on getting things right, the other carriers were taking notes and "Phew-ing" under their breath because this could have been them.
  • Reply 17 of 210
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    "We've been working for months to prepare the radio access controllers in our network to support this launch. That means calibrating base stations all over the country, and frankly that's a very time-consuming process."



    Does anyone else think this sounds like meaningless technobabble? I could understand if they said they needed to upgrade their base stations, but calibrate them? What are they gonna do? Tilt the antennae 5° to the left?
  • Reply 18 of 210
    aplnubaplnub Posts: 2,605member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by 7600/132 View Post


    Does anyone else think this sounds like meaningless technobabble? I could understand if they said they needed to upgrade their base stations, but calibrate them? What are they gonna do? Tilt the antennae 5° to the left?



    Maybe the dilithium phase crystals needed a a tri-corder waved over them and they had to crawl through the Jeffries Tubes to reach them in the port nacelle. It's AT&T. They are getting nervous in advance of Verizon's 4G network and inevitable iPhone deployment.
  • Reply 19 of 210
    welshdogwelshdog Posts: 1,853member
    Look AT&T is really SBC. And SBC was/is a hard nosed, cutthroat company more like Wal Mart than Apple. AT&T/SBC is also known for it's relentless legislative campaigns to get laws passed that specifically target their bottom line. Not just lobbying, but legislating from the board room. IMO they don't do anything the "right" way, they do it the cheap way. Just enough to get by while maximizing profit. Overbuilding a data network is not they way they roll. Under building a data network and locking in a super sweet deal with an innovator like Apple is their style. They have a dedicated army of white collar workers who do nothing but squeeze every dime out of their customers and suppliers. I know that sounds like just plain good business, but the way they do it is more like warfare. And sometimes we are the collateral damage.
  • Reply 20 of 210
    rnp1rnp1 Posts: 175member
    [QUOTE=aplnub;1476479]Maybe the dilithium phase crystals needed a a tri-corder waved over them and they had to crawl through the Jeffries Tubes to reach them in the port nacelle. It's AT&T. They are getting nervous in advance of Verizon's 4G network and inevitable iPhone deployment.[/QUOTE



    "Don't mince words Bones, whadahu really think?"
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