Evidence of Apple's tablet-like input interface reappears

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 82
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,585member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


    I am not too worried. Every innovation Apple ever comes out with is met with skepticism however most end up changing the World and leave competitors scrambling trying to copy them. As to over coming resistance, remember they have an almost lunatic following (I am one) and the iTunes ecosystem to feed off.



    I also suspect SJ is going to do with the publishing industry what he did with the music industry and have most popular magazines and newspapers available from iTunes shortly after launch.



    And one thing more ... whatever that is



    I expect they will figure it out in some way. But predicting what the public will buy isn't easy.



    With the iPod, it was seen that the concept was becoming popular.



    With the iPhone, it was known the concept was popular.



    With the tablet, the concept has been seen to be a failure.



    That's a very different area to break into. They have to turn a very unpopular concept into a popular one. Can they do that?



    Remember the Cube. Great idea, beautiful device, but a failure for several reasons.



    Can Apple really make a tablet costing between $800 and $1,000, and make a good case for it?



    We see that the price estimates keep moving up. As the screen gets larger, so does the price. And so does the clumsiness.



    If, as some have written, they can replace the MB with a tablet, that might work, but this doesn't look to be that.
  • Reply 22 of 82
    anonymouseanonymouse Posts: 6,924member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JohnnyKrz View Post


    To me, this almost sounds more like a potential new input device for desktops which would replace the keyboard, mouse and pretty much any other type of input device.



    I agree, especially the part about it being ergonomically shaped.
  • Reply 23 of 82
    cubertcubert Posts: 728member
    It would seem like there would have to be some sort of tactile feedback so that you wouldn't have to look at the keys to avoid accidentally hitting two at once.



    Otherwise, we will have a lot of pissed off high school typing teachers.

    ("Achtung!!! Eyes on the screen!")



  • Reply 24 of 82
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,585member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    This is probably a really dumb question, But I'll ask anyway. Is there any finiteness to the life of a capacitance-based input device. In other words, could, say, a keyboard based on that be expected to last for many, many years?



    Essentially, they have unlimited life, esp if coated with glass, as done in Apple's products, and some others.
  • Reply 25 of 82
    cubertcubert Posts: 728member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jwyatt View Post


    Here's hoping that the complexity of this UI reflects the notion that the tablet will run the full Mac OS and not the just iphone OS. While whatever the tablet ends up being I'm sure will be awesome I'm hoping for a device that is capable of running iwork, pages etc. as well as iphone apps. Rumors keeping going back and fourth on this topic...exciting.



    My guess is that it will be closer to the iPhone OS than OS X. I also think it will be able to run apps for both OS'es. You could probably install Photoshop on it but it may not be pretty trying to run it. Kinda like installing Photoshop on an old iBook - nothing is preventing you from doing it (assuming Universal binary, of course) but it wouldn't be pretty.
  • Reply 26 of 82
    cubertcubert Posts: 728member
    "Provide images of "flesh proximity" to a variety of sensors that can distinguish hand configuration."



    Just what in the world does this mean?



    \
  • Reply 27 of 82
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cubert View Post


    It would seem like there would have to be some sort of tactile feedback so that you wouldn't have to look at the keys to avoid accidentally hitting two at once.



    Unless this is a different concept. What if there are no keys to hit, in the traditional sense? What struck me from the diagram, and what the input device would be sensing, is that wherever you place your hands on the surface could be "home", defining your keyboard position. Then the input could "sense" what keys you are hitting, based upon movement relative to your "home" position. I'm sure there could still be a visual keyboard in the traditional sense if desired, However, I at times type jibberish because I mis-place my hands on the keyboard. In this situation, the device would look for my fingers, rather than my fingers looking for the keys.
  • Reply 28 of 82
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,585member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cubert View Post


    My guess is that it will be closer to the iPhone OS than OS X. I also think it will be able to run apps for both OS'es. You could probably install Photoshop on it but it may not be pretty trying to run it. Kinda like installing Photoshop on an old iBook - nothing is preventing you from doing it (assuming Universal binary, of course) but it wouldn't be pretty.



    I think that a lot of people here aren't thinking this through.



    This is a DIFFERENT PROCESSOR folks!



    Everyone who could directly run their 68xxxx programs on their new PPC machines without using Apple's emulator (or third party ones), raise your hands.



    Everyone who could run their PPC program on their 68xxxx machines, raise your hands.



    Everyone who could run their PPC programs on their Intel Macs without Rosetta, raise your hands.



    Everyone who could run their Intel programs on their PPC machines, raise your hands.



    Hmm. No hands up.



    No x86 chip in this, no OS X programs.
  • Reply 29 of 82
    probablyprobably Posts: 139member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by melgross View Post


    With the iPod, it was seen that the concept was becoming popular.



    With the iPhone, it was known the concept was popular.



    With the tablet, the concept has been seen to be a failure.



    That's a very different area to break into. They have to turn a very unpopular concept into a popular one. Can they do that?



    Remember the Cube. Great idea, beautiful device, but a failure for several reasons.



    The cube is entirely unrelated to fabricating a new way to compute. It didn't offer anything new: just a really fun design and a high price tag.



    Also I didn't see anyone mention that lesser-known detail regarding how the iPhone keyboard dynamically resizes the letters invisibly. That Fingerworks-derived detail of the interface is what every other mobile's software keyboard lacks -- is why the rest of the no-hardware-button devices don't feel right. It's why iPhone users can type at reasonable speeds now. See the "Dynamic Key Resizing" section of this writeup: http://ignorethecode.net/blog/2009/0...e-and-android/



    This patent looks like a ridiculously complex evolution of all that statistical-assistance in correcting the fact that you're typing on a piece of glass.
  • Reply 30 of 82
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,585member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by probably View Post


    The cube is entirely unrelated to fabricating a new way to compute. It didn't offer anything new: just a really fun design and a high price tag.



    And that's why the lesson is important. Since people didn't see it as a radical way of computing, they could be comfortable knowing they wouldn't have to change their methods, or buy new programs.



    This might be radical. Radical isn't good because it's radical. It must offer people something that they've wanted, or, now that they see it, something that they now want.



    And it looks as though it will also be expensive. If it doesn't replace something else, then it's an additional expense. Do people want large additional expenses? Now?



    And if they have to pay $30 a month for 3G service, in addition to their monthly phone bill, will they want to do that? And if they don't, does that kill much of the usefulness of the device?
  • Reply 31 of 82
    jupiteronejupiterone Posts: 1,564member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cubert View Post


    "Provide images of "flesh proximity" to a variety of sensors that can distinguish hand configuration."



    Just what in the world does this mean?



    \



    Bow chicka bow bow.....

  • Reply 32 of 82
    dagazdagaz Posts: 19member
    Apparently when SJ was first shown the 'tablet' he said something along the lines of "looks cool, but what I would I actually use it for?" Even after all this time I have yet to hear anything that would make me want to get a tablet device. I love my MacBook, I love my iPhone, what would I use something in between for? Reading newspapers?
  • Reply 33 of 82
    rob55rob55 Posts: 1,291member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ~ufo~ View Post


    Now this, to me at least, is really interesting.



    Consider having an iMac like desktop.



    with a touch tablet flat in front of it, kind of like the touch wacoms, but in the form of a portable tablet.



    I, as an iPhone used, have found myself touching my iMac's screen quite a few times in vein to click on something. Now, as nice as it would be to have a 24" multitouch screen on my iMac, we can hopefully all agree that it is not the most ergonomic of input interfaces.



    if you were to have your home desktop iMac type machine, be it touch screen or not, and get rid of the keyboard and mouse altogether replacing it by a 10" touch smart touch screen now that would be a whole new approach to computing.



    After you are done working at home, you just take the tablet with you, which is an autonomous device on it's own, as the apple tablet is proposed to be.



    I can truly see a lot of merit in this.

    It is both the desktop and laptop redefined.



    I would have no problem paying $600-800 for it either.



    Any takers?



    This is precisely what I envisioned reading the article. I would be all over some kind of multi-touch keyboard/mouse replacement and tablet type of device. The trick will be to make typing as smooth and efficient as using a conventional keyboard where you can actually feel the keys. I imagine it'll have to incorporate some kind of predictive software similar to (but much better than) what is used on the iPhone. I love the touch-pad on my MBP so much, I've been wishing someone would make something like it for the iMac/MacPro. Wacom just came out with their multi-touch device, but I'm really hoping for one made by Apple.
  • Reply 34 of 82
    jazzgurujazzguru Posts: 6,435member
    Keyboards are already evolving in this direction. It's the next natural step. Just take a look at the ASUS EEE Keyboard.
  • Reply 35 of 82
    irelandireland Posts: 17,799member
    If you are a good company Apple will absorb you.
  • Reply 36 of 82
    irelandireland Posts: 17,799member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JohnnyKrz View Post


    To me, this almost sounds more like a potential new input device for desktops which would replace the keyboard, mouse and pretty much any other type of input device.



    I fail to see it being more efficient than a keyboard and mouse, though if it was I wouldn't complain.
  • Reply 37 of 82
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by zindako View Post


    I feel sorry for the netbook market already, watch out Microsoft, you're about to find yourself hobbling behind trying to get your very own tablet device once apple drops this baby, and fail horribly at its inception and interface.



    Premium (overpriced) netbooks do have to worry, but the likes of the Acer Aspire and other $300 netbooks needn't fret too much since Apple's tablet will cost substantially more.
  • Reply 38 of 82
    jazzgurujazzguru Posts: 6,435member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by applebook View Post


    Premium (overpriced) netbooks do have to worry, but the likes of the Acer Aspire and other $300 netbooks needn't fret too much since Apple's tablet will cost substantially more.



    I don't understand the whole "premium netbook" thing.



    It seems netbooks are moving away from the small 8.9" screens to 10" - 12" screens.



    I absolutely love my ASUS EEE PC 900HA with the 8.9" screen. I got it for $230 refurbished and I don't think I'd be as pleased with it if it were any larger than it is.



    I think you're right, Apple's tablet will fill in the gap between the low-end netbooks and the full-fledged notebooks. Why buy a 10" netbook for $500-$600 when you can have an Apple tablet for approx. the same price?



    As with the iPhone, I think it is going to be a game changer.
  • Reply 39 of 82
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by melgross View Post


    ...



    But a standard keyboard is a bit over 10.5" in length, excluding the numeric pad. A 10.6" diag screen will be too short, so the keyboard would be a bit cramped. They'll have to figure out a way around that.



    Agreed. So what about an iTube? The 10" is the height of the "tube" screen when rolled up.
  • Reply 40 of 82
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by melgross View Post


    ...



    But a standard keyboard is a bit over 10.5" in length, excluding the numeric pad. A 10.6" diag screen will be too short, so the keyboard would be a bit cramped. They'll have to figure out a way around that.



    Agreed. So what about an iTube? The 10" is merely the height of the "tube" screen when rolled up.
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