OnLive cloud gaming service demonstrated on Apple's iPhone

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
OnLive, the Internet-based interactive streaming service hyped as "the future of video games," is also capable of running on mobile devices such as Apple's iPhone, the company has claimed.



At the Wedbush financial conference in New York, OnLive CEO Steve Perlman demonstrated his company's game streaming service simultaneously on two iPhones. Perlman detailed the event on his company's official blog.



"While we only showed a tech demo today, it was great to give people in the audience a chance to try out OnLive on an iPhone," he said. "The large tiles that make up the OnLive user interface work perfectly on the iPhone touch screen, allowing easy access to all of the features of the OnLive game service."



OnLive is an ambitious gaming service that intends to offer the gaming equivalent of cloud computing. In theory, the service would allow gamers to utilize an inexpensive "thin client" at home to access a catalogue of current games with high-end graphics needs.



The service aims to eliminate the need for costly PCs capable of running system-intensive modern games like Crysis. Instead, all of the computing would be handled remotely, and the game itself would be streamed as video to the user at home, eliminating the need to have the expensive horsepower to render a game locally.



OnLive was previously demonstrated on TVs, via a "MicroConsole," and PCs and Macs. But the latest demonstration would bring the service into the mobile market, streaming interactive games to devices like the iPhone as low-latency video via a broadband Internet connection.







Perlman cautioned that console and PC-style gaming is not ideal on a device like the iPhone. He said the initial plans call for users to be able to track their friends online and spectate their live gameplay on the go. However, he said that the company will "eventually" bring new games to mobile phones.



No release date for OnLive on the iPhone was given. Perlman said the recent showing served only as a proof-of-concept technology demo.



"But, for those of you who have been asking about OnLive on cell phones, the answer is yes, it is coming," he said. "And, it is REALLY cool."



Games on the iPhone have recently been in the spotlight, most notably last week when AppleInsider detailed a job listing for a game and media software engineer at Apple. Though the Cupertino, Calif., company has only produced one game, Texas Hold'em, to date for the iPhone and iPod touch, the hiring could suggest it is looking to expand its first-party software.



In September, Apple debuted the new 64GB iPod touch with a faster processor. It portrayed the hardware as a fun device meant for media and games, and highlighted a number of high-profile releases for the platform. This year, some of the biggest names in game publishing have come to the iPhone and iPod touch, bringing blockbuster franchises.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 18
    sheffsheff Posts: 1,407member
    The concept is interesting, but how responsive would this be. I mean talk about laaaag when you have to connect to both the server and thee OnLive server. I say a competitive disadvantage. Plus there is gonna be delay between your motion and the game's motion on a remote server. This may be small, but when combined with similar lag to the game's server you get a significant delay, especially for FPS. Not sold but interesting concept.
  • Reply 2 of 18
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sheff View Post


    The concept is interesting, but how responsive would this be. I mean talk about laaaag when you have to connect to both the server and thee OnLive server. I say a competitive disadvantage. Plus there is gonna be delay between your motion and the game's motion on a remote server. This may be small, but when combined with similar lag to the game's server you get a significant delay, especially for FPS. Not sold but interesting concept.



    I agree entirely. You cannot change the laws of physics. Though certainly suitable for certain types of games, like er.. unresponsive ones such as Konami's "hear my echo" and suchlike.
  • Reply 3 of 18
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post


    I agree entirely. You cannot change the laws of physics. Though certainly suitable for certain types of games, like er.. unresponsive ones such as Konami's "hear my echo" and suchlike.



    There was a video circulating a while ago of the software in action on the "micro console." I believe it was running Crysis. You could actually see the lag. Watching the person's hand on the joypad, you could see when he selected the fire button and then watch the delay when the on screen character actually fired.



    I had heard that the speculation was the company was going to put servers locally at various ISPs to minimize the lag but I can't ever see the technology working well for a shooter.



    -kpluck
  • Reply 4 of 18
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,753moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kpluck View Post


    There was a video circulating a while ago of the software in action on the "micro console." I believe it was running Crysis. You could actually see the lag. Watching the person's hand on the joypad, you could see when he selected the fire button and then watch the delay when the on screen character actually fired.



    I had heard that the speculation was the company was going to put servers locally at various ISPs to minimize the lag but I can't ever see the technology working well for a shooter.



    Perlman talks about the lag in the long OnLive stage presentation. I don't think I'd mind it that much. Here is a video of their competitor OTOY running GTA 4 in a browser:



    http://www.techcrunch.com/2009/06/16...e-to-see-this/



    They point out the lag explicitly and I think it's something you could get accustomed to, so long as the lag wasn't variable. Perlman said that the lag was acceptable up to about 1500 miles between server and client.



    The problem with this business model is it assumes most people won't be playing high end games. If they are, the limit is something like 10 clients per server, which can get expensive. On a subscription model though, the costs can be covered adequately.



    Perlman also addressed the issue of bandwidth caps and points out that the bandwidth usage is ISP friendly. Typically people play 60 hours a month or something - about 2 hours a night on average - so streaming data at even 10Mbits/s for HD should fall within a 250GB cap. SD streaming will fit well within that limit and gaming won't use the full stream all the time.



    I would love to get some casual gaming but I hate the idea of paying so much for a console and games that cost about 1/4 of the console again when they might not even be that good. It's getting really expensive, whereas an inexpensive subscription you don't notice so much.



    The big draw for publishers is that it allows them to deliver PC gaming with zero chance of piracy. This will do two things - kill and revive PC gaming at the same time. Publishers won't bother making games for the PC as distributions any more, they will make it part of the online service. However, the lower cost of the subscription will likely draw in people who would otherwise have to buy an expensive console. The exclusive titles will always sway people one way or the other but I think the online services can make a very popular business model and certainly one that I'd subscribe to myself if the price is right.
  • Reply 5 of 18
    Although I appear dismissive of this model for gaming in my earlier post, I do believe it will carve a niche for itself.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kpluck View Post


    I had heard that the speculation was the company was going to put servers locally at various ISPs to minimize the lag



    Yeah I think that would be the way to go.
  • Reply 6 of 18
    I'm with y'all on this one. The lag - no matter how small - will be enough to guarantee the complete destruction of any semi-n00b without a "pro" home system.



    The first logical step might be a low-latency terminal to a centralized home PC unit, but seeing as how slow screen sharing (vlc) is over the WiFi network in my own house, I'd say even that's a stretch for mobile devices. Maybe for stationary ethernet-wired connections, but by then what's the point?



    -Clive
  • Reply 7 of 18
    eaieai Posts: 417member
    Onlive claim they've solved the lag problem, but we'll see. Obviously, there's no way this would be suitable for phone networks, which can easily have latency in 2-5 seconds. The other issue is obvious controls.



    I'd guess that OnLive are just demonstrating this to get a bit of PR - the iPhone is cool, so attaching themselves to it makes them look good. The whole point of OnLive is that the hardware doesn't really matter - OnLive would work just as well (or badly) on any other device with a similar processor.
  • Reply 8 of 18
    I don't know about that. The idea has merit and the technology has been coming for awhile. I just don't think the connectivity is there yet. Maybe you're right that they are just trying to tie onto the iphone star because after looking at it more it seems premature.



    Besides, when there are so many gaming options out there it would have to be really cool to woo people away. I mean, there are over 130 gaming options on just one site alone http://m.seego.com/top-category/gaming
  • Reply 9 of 18
    estyleestyle Posts: 201member
    Gaming for the AppleTV

    This would be a great capability to work into the AppleTV

    YouTube >> Photos >> Gaming (Courtesy of OnLive)



    It would fit the model as it has so far been developed

    Add more interest to the little box

    And could be utilized like the movies in advertisements



    "Play your games at home on a big screen,

    and when it is time to go,

    pack the kids in the car while they continue playing on their iPhones.

    Take gaming with you everywhere!!"
  • Reply 10 of 18
    davegeedavegee Posts: 2,765member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post


    I agree entirely. You cannot change the laws of physics.



    Try telling that to the man who invented the Heisenberg Compensator...
  • Reply 11 of 18
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post


    I agree entirely. You cannot change the laws of physics. Though certainly suitable for certain types of games, like er.. unresponsive ones such as Konami's "hear my echo" and suchlike.



    Perhaps this would work in the future with a huge array of localized servers in each region of the USA, and everyone has low-latency, 50mbit fiber-to-the-home connections...



    I guess I can see it being adequate on an average 5mbit cable broadband connection, but on a cell phone?? Even with HSPA 3G, throughput and especially latency will be a killer -- not to even speak of the 600-1000ms latencies of AT&T's EDGE.
  • Reply 12 of 18
    BAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



    I had this idea YEARS ago! Why the heck can't people under 18 years of age get patents!!!
  • Reply 13 of 18
    brucepbrucep Posts: 2,823member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


    Perlman talks about the lag in the long OnLive stage presentation. I don't think I'd mind it that much. Here is a video of their competitor OTOY running GTA 4 in a browser:



    http://www.techcrunch.com/2009/06/16...e-to-see-this/



    They point out the lag explicitly and I think it's something you could get accustomed to, so long as the lag wasn't variable. Perlman said that the lag was acceptable up to about 1500 miles between server and client.



    The problem with this business model is it assumes most people won't be playing high end games. If they are, the limit is something like 10 clients per server, which can get expensive. On a subscription model though, the costs can be covered adequately.



    Perlman also addressed the issue of bandwidth caps and points out that the bandwidth usage is ISP friendly. Typically people play 60 hours a month or something - about 2 hours a night on average - so streaming data at even 10Mbits/s for HD should fall within a 250GB cap. SD streaming will fit well within that limit and gaming won't use the full stream all the time.



    I would love to get some casual gaming but I hate the idea of paying so much for a console and games that cost about 1/4 of the console again when they might not even be that good. It's getting really expensive, whereas an inexpensive subscription you don't notice so much.



    The big draw for publishers is that it allows them to deliver PC gaming with zero chance of piracy. This will do two things - kill and revive PC gaming at the same time. Publishers won't bother making games for the PC as distributions any more, they will make it part of the online service. However, the lower cost of the subscription will likely draw in people who would otherwise have to buy an expensive console. The exclusive titles will always sway people one way or the other but I think the online services can make a very popular business model and certainly one that I'd subscribe to myself if the price is right.



    THIS WILL BE A > IN THE END A $15/$35 a month add on charge to your monthly cable/broadband bill. THese online cloud guys have no need to re invent the wheel.





    AND It will be yrs before we see halo/cod up in the clouds>> unless they make light versions .



    These guys don't need high end 3d games to survive anyway.

    There shooting for the hundreds of millions of poorer kids world wide with no access to any cool games at all.



    These kids and young adults with there low power netbooks would have great access to hundred's of top line games /

    people will also write low power games like OTTO MATIC for the cloud subscription service , and educators can also write games that teach and are fun at the same time,



    And because 4g/7g networks are 10x more powerful unlimited streaming will be the way it works .



    . And of course the dozens of online companies with dozens of their own under>used MEGA SERVERS can start there own ONLINE game playing pay 10 bucks a month service.

    maybe the xbox just died.





    AMAZON/NETFLIX/HULU will be the first to copy this ONLINE IN THE CLOUDS GAMING or add just these guys on to there systems . anyone.?



    Apple server farm is looking groovy right now .









    i can't wait to see this new industry grow and mature .



    peace



    9
  • Reply 14 of 18
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,753moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by eAi View Post


    I'd guess that OnLive are just demonstrating this to get a bit of PR - the iPhone is cool, so attaching themselves to it makes them look good.



    Possibly also because it's one of the few mobile devices that supports full 802.11g wifi, has a large screen with responsive controls (unlike Blackberry) and a good developer kit (unlike most mobiles). Also, Steve Perlman used to be a Quicktime developer for Apple so they are behind Mac users. He even pointed this out on stage saying that he was disappointed the Mac never got more marketshare because it was capable of playing games but nobody ported games to the platform.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Clive At Five


    The lag - no matter how small - will be enough to guarantee the complete destruction of any semi-n00b without a "pro" home system.



    It's on the order of milliseconds though and there would be similar lag in any online game - even a local game has to sync the player movements.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by estyle


    It would fit the model as it has so far been developed

    Add more interest to the little box

    And could be utilized like the movies in advertisements



    It would certainly make the ATV much more appealing because it can play high end games too and you get to demo the games instantly. In fact, you could even have ads that say 'click here to start playing' and it will jump straight into the game. That's one thing about the way games are distributed now is they don't all have ways to demo the game before spending a lot of money.



    The other thing is about parental control. Parents can ensure kids only play games of a certain rating and they can buy a certain amount of hours gaming so the system can shut off when the time is out.



    No matter what way we look at the theoretical aspects of this service, major industry players are backing this now and they wouldn't have unless the demoes had worked out ok. We'll see when they roll out the system officially over the next month.
  • Reply 15 of 18
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Neotyguy40 View Post


    BAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



    I had this idea YEARS ago! Why the heck can't people under 18 years of age get patents!!!



    They are working on this since 2002
  • Reply 16 of 18
    Wow, I really dont see what all the fuss is about. I mean reall can someone explain.



    Jess
  • Reply 17 of 18
    I understand the concern about lag with something like OnLive, but it seems to people are missing the point that while any network is going to have lag associated with it, this will have a very different kind of lag. I don't know if it will be better or worse than what you'd expect today, but it's definitely not the same.



    Currently when you play a network game, each user has essentially their own copy of the entire world and the state of everything in it. Thousands of times per second the game server looks at everyone's copy and tries to make sure everyone is on the same page. So, if I move from point a to point b, the server has to let everybody else know this happened in my copy of the world and get everything in sync.



    So, the lag you experience is that you fire a weapon instantly in your world but before the bullet can connect your world finds out that the person really isn't standing there anymore yada yada. So, you've been burned because you were shooting a gun at an outdated version of the environment. Lag cheats take advantage of this by intentionally manipulating their connection.



    With OnLive there is only 1 exact version. In it, everyone is exactly where they are. There is 1 game state and no syncing is required. Your screen is essentially watching streaming video and everyone has a remote control.



    Now, the lag here will be the round trip time from your controller to the server and back to the screen. So, a lousy connection for you will mean your trigger feels slow, but a lousy connection for someone else doesn't affect you at all (at least not negatively).



    Again, I don't know if this will be better, but if they can really work out the individual latency issues, I can definitely see benefits.
  • Reply 18 of 18
    brucepbrucep Posts: 2,823member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jcbeeno View Post


    Wow, I really dont see what all the fuss is about. I mean reall can someone explain.



    Jess



    You may if you will > take a LOW power p/c >> and play 100's of games .

    the games are in the clouds . the p/c is on the earth .
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