Google Nexus One teardown photos reveal 'thoughtful' design

13567

Comments

  • Reply 41 of 128
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by steviet02 View Post


    Those features don't move them ahead.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Aizmov View Post


    The next iPhone needs to deliver:
    • AMOLED screen

    • Radio

    • Higher resolution

    • Longer battery life

    It's not in Apple's best interest to fall behind in a segment it created.



    Those are standard interative improvements and not ground breaking. How apple moved ahead with the first finger based phone operating system, fast and a great experience, proper internet browser, syncing and shopping experience as easy as the familar ipod. No one else has come close yet, Nokia are still resistive (can't do multitouch), Android is a hacked together clunky badly designed slow UI. Mobile hardware is good enough now, now it is all about the user experience of an easy to use phone, which Apple have nailed.
  • Reply 42 of 128
    g3prog3pro Posts: 669member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by steviet02 View Post


    What does 'pushing the envelope" actually mean? I'm hearing this from a lot of people but no one is expanding on the cliche's as to what Apple really needs to do to move ahead.



    At this point, Apple really needs to catch up in terms of having the same features of other phones that have come out within the last year, and that includes both hardware and software features.



    To push the envelope means they need to deliver something truly original, but nobody has any idea of what that would be.
  • Reply 43 of 128
    seafoxseafox Posts: 90member
    What an eye-opening comparison in features between the two devices. It pretty much soundly trounces all of Apple's statements that it can't do x on the iPhone for design reasons, the reason generally being that the iPhone is too thin to allow it.



    As for this battery door business, adding a removable battery door doesn't necessarily mean a "cheap plastic door" They could have the entire metal back plate on the iPhone slide off like a sleeve. What really keeps the iPhone's battery from being removable is Apple soldering it on or not using a connector made to be connected or disconnected multiple times times.



    Same with having a micro SD card slot, they don't have to have a door to add it, they don't even have to add storage expandability in a way the encourages multiple cads you swap. Just adding the ability to add a card at all would be a big leap forward. They could have it be a slot you push the card into (like the SIM card socket) or a socket under the battry (if they added a removable battery). The reason they don't have nothing to do with space, it's simple so people can't upgrade their storage capacity themselves.



    It occurred to me it's quite a bit like the old ripoff of having the RAM upgraded on your new Mac Pro when you order it, paying several times actual market price for the memory simply because you let Apple do it at time of sale. With no micro-SD card slot the iPhone is the same way, the customer has to pay Apple for a higher capacity rather than just add their own cheaper memory card after purchase, and if they ever outgrow the needs of their device they have to buy a whole new device now instead of just getting a larger card for it. How that for environmental responsibility?
  • Reply 44 of 128
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 2,574member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Masterz1337 View Post


    Man, the iPhone 4 is going to have to be pretty impressive if they are going to best the Nexus One.



    The tech specs of this phone are impressive, however there is absolutely no reason why Apple couldn't make a phone with the exact same technical specifications. There is nothing special about the Nexus One except that it is using newer parts, and given that the iPhone is now 6 months old, I would hope the tech specs of most new phones would be better.



    Although at half the tech specs the iPhone OS is still a much more smoother experience as several reviewers of Android 2.1 / Nexus One have pointed. They say the animation is almost as smooth as the iPhone 3GS, but at times is jerky for no apparent reason.



    What currently sets the iPhone apart is OS X and Cocoa Touch. What will set it apart in the near future is even tighter integration with an Apple designed ARM chip, which would more than likely be optimized for OS X.
  • Reply 45 of 128
    igeniusigenius Posts: 1,240member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post


    God I hope not, non replaceable battery is one of my favourite features. I hate weak plastic doors.



    Do you imagine that Apple is incapable of competently designing a battery cover?
  • Reply 46 of 128
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 2,574member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by indiekiduk View Post


    I thought it wasn't supposed to have HTC written on it, but its on the back. How is this google phone any different from the G1,G2 etc... BBC were saying Google have entered the hardware market with the Nexus, but it seems to me they have just remarketed the latest android hardware by HTC, and nothing has really changed. Confusing the market is not the way to increase sales.



    It's not a Google phone and Google has stated that. It is an HTC phone that Google is offering direct to consumers, that is what has changed. Google wants to do with Android phones what Apple has managed to do with the iPhone.



    Google has also stated that it will offer up phones from other manufacturers as well. This is one way of keeping carriers' hands off the devices, so that consumers can get the full Android experience.
  • Reply 47 of 128
    igeniusigenius Posts: 1,240member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post




    Doing things the way they were always done is not "innovation." Especially when the results are obviously better doing it the new way.



    Try to keep up. The "new way" is to have a big, bright screen and a higher-end processor.



    If you like last-year's tech, that's fine too.
  • Reply 48 of 128
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,951member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AjitMD View Post


    Apple will have a hard time matching the hardware performance since it is tied to the Samsung ARM chipset. They stood still for too long without making radical changes with each model... Google did not stand still. Apple will have to enable multitasking, VoIP, Skype always on.



    No wonder the Apple stock got hit today.



    Who says Apple is tied to Samsung's chip designs? They can design their own chips now, I think they have design licenses for more powerful chips. They control the software too, so any changes they have to make in the hardware can be accommodated in the software.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Aizmov View Post


    The next iPhone needs to deliver:
    • AMOLED screen

    • Radio

    • Higher resolution

    • Longer battery life

    It's not in Apple's best interest to fall behind in a segment it created.



    Apple didn't create a segment. But I doubt many people are that worried about radio. In the music player space, Apple has outsold everybody that has offered a radio, while not offering a standard radio for six years. I'm surprised that people that think of themselves as techies want radio. Frankly, I'm surprised people tolerate it. At least in the US, commercial radio is irritating. A third of the air time goes to ads, and a lot of them are borderline scams, overly repeated or irritatingly loud and obnoxious. The only good reason to have radio is just live events, otherwise, there's no reason to listen for linear programming, I don't have time to set aside to listen at 3pm or whatever, I tend to forget stuff like that.



    I had even tried a Samsung and Creative player with radios, and they just weren't any good indoors and the quality was shaky outdoors.



    I wouldn't be surprised if higher res and battery life is improved on the next refresh. I don't know about OLED, maybe, if the production lines can handle making 20+ million of them a year. But if they're still somewhat inefficient, then battery life is a concern. OLED is nice, but it's not something I have to have.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SeaFox View Post


    Same with having a micro SD card slot, they don't have to have a door to add it, they don't even have to add storage expandability in a way the encourages multiple cads you swap. Just adding the ability to add a card at all would be a big leap forward. They could have it be a slot you push the card into (like the SIM card socket) or a socket under the battry (if they added a removable battery). The reason they don't have nothing to do with space, it's simple so people can't upgrade their storage capacity themselves.



    What do you get from an mSD card slot? Do you swap the cards at home, or do you somehow try to swap the cards "in the field" and risk losing the cards? A card slot would be nice, but the cards are simply too small to swap in the field, I only think of the slot as a way to add memory, not as a way to play "disk swap" with easy to drop, easy to lose pinky nail cards.
  • Reply 49 of 128
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 2,574member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by g3pro View Post


    So it looks like it's possible to have a replaceable battery without sacrificing compact design or brute processing power.



    Apple never said it wasn't possible, they just prefer not to have them,





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by g3pro View Post


    All phones should have the ability to swap batteries so that when you're on a long trip without access to an outlet you can at least do stuff on your phone for longer than 1 battery charge.



    That's funny, whenever I take the bus to Chicago (a six+ hour trip), I don't have access to an outlet, I also don't have a second user-replacable battery, and yet even after six hours of constant use, when I step off the bus my iPhone battery is 100% charged. I wonder how that's at all possible? It must be magic?





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by g3pro View Post


    I really hope Apple innovates the iPhone with user-replaceable batteries.



    User-replacable batteries are not an innovation. Don't bet on it ever happening in the iPhone. It is pretty much a non-issue for a majority of people, the iPod proved that, the iPhone proved that and at the number of laptops they sell, MacBooks prove that as well.



    Obviously if you're someone who can't live without carrying a second battery with you, then Apple products are not going to be for you. So move along. Whining about it isn't going to make it happen.



    There is nothing like beating a dead horse. This argument has been going on since the original iPod eight years ago. You really think Apple is going to change their minds about it after all this time?
  • Reply 50 of 128
    This can only mean good things for iPhone owners. I'm ready to replace my 16GB 3G this summer... maybe this will push them for an even better phone.
  • Reply 51 of 128
    g3prog3pro Posts: 669member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


    What do you get from an mSD card slot? Do you swap the cards at home, or do you somehow try to swap the cards "in the field" and risk losing the cards? A card slot would be nice, but the cards are simply too small to swap in the field, I only think of the slot as a way to add memory, not as a way to play "disk swap" with easy to drop, easy to lose pinky nail cards.



    More space.



    Upgradability.



    Without buying a completely new unit. *









    * - which is exactly what Apple does not want FOR PROFIT REASONS ALONE. I.E., THE USER GETS SCREWED.
  • Reply 52 of 128
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iGenius View Post


    Do you imagine that Apple is incapable of competently designing a battery cover?



    The Magic Mouse battery cover seems quite alright.
  • Reply 53 of 128
    g3prog3pro Posts: 669member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mjtomlin View Post


    Apple never said it wasn't possible, they just prefer not to have them,



    Yes they did. That was a big so-called "feature" with the new moldable batteries they were praising.





    Quote:

    That's funny, whenever I take the bus to Chicago (a six+ hour trip), I don't have access to an outlet, I also don't have a second user-replacable battery, and yet even after six hours of constant use, when I step off the bus my iPhone battery is 100% charged. I wonder how that's at all possible? It must be magic?



    What is your definition of use? "Using" a phone while it is off, consisting of you moving it around in your front pocket, does not count. It must be ON.



    Yes, using a phone for 6 hours ON BATTERY POWER ALONE WITH NO OTHER POWER SOURCE, still allows you to have 100% charge.



    Yes, that is magic.





    Quote:

    User-replacable batteries are not an innovation. Don't bet on it ever happening in the iPhone.



    Because Apple would rather have someone throw out a perfectly good phone minus a dead-battery so that you are forced to buy a new unit or pay someone an ungodly amount of money to have it serviced.



    Quote:

    It is pretty much a non-issue for a majority of people, the iPod proved that, the iPhone proved that



    Which explains the class-action lawsuit over this issue? Which explains the millions of people who complain when their iPod or iPhone batteries are dead and need to be serviced?
  • Reply 54 of 128
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mjtomlin View Post


    Apple never said it wasn't possible, they just prefer not to have them,









    That's funny, whenever I take the bus to Chicago (a six+ hour trip), I don't have access to an outlet, I also don't have a second user-replacable battery, and yet even after six hours of constant use, when I step off the bus my iPhone battery is 100% charged. I wonder how that's at all possible? It must be magic?









    User-replacable batteries are not an innovation. Don't bet on it ever happening in the iPhone. It is pretty much a non-issue for a majority of people, the iPod proved that, the iPhone proved that and at the number of laptops they sell, MacBooks prove that as well.



    Obviously if you're someone who can't live without carrying a second battery with you, then Apple products are not going to be for you. So move along. Whining about it isn't going to make it happen.



    There is nothing like beating a dead horse. This argument has been going on since the original iPod eight years ago. You really think Apple is going to change their minds about it after all this time?



    Watch out... we have a fanboy here.



    1. Apple said in order to keep the phone slim as they intended... user replaceable batteries not possible. Google has proved to Apple that it can be done. Get over it, no ones saying they hate Apple... but there is always room for improvement. It's people like you with your nose so far up Apple's rear-end, who keep innovation at a stand still... instead of pushing them for improvements.

    2. Your story about a 6 hour bus ride, with a 100% at the end of your trip. I'm assuming you mean you don't use the phone at all during that trip. Because if you're suggesting that you can use your phone for 6 hours... hell even 1 hour, and still have a 100% charge. Well all I can do is laugh at you, for thinking anyone would believe that kind of bullshit.

    3. You really think Apple's attitude is, people who use their phone enough that they require 2nd batteries should stay away from their products? Please go ahead and show me any indication of them ever suggesting that, or feel free to write to them and come back with that info. Apple wants as many customers as they can, they marketed the 3G for business people by adding exchange and cloud syncing features. Business people are the exact sort of crowd who could benefit from user-replaceable batteries. I don't have a need for a replaceable battery either, but guess what... you and I don't make up every Apple customer out there.



    You're such a pompous little prick, I could just tell 10 seconds into reading your post without even knowing you personally. The sad part is, you're actually just a dolt who should keep his mouth shut. I can't tell you how happy I am knowing, with that attitude you'll never get a job at Apple because of your poor attitude. Crawl back into your miserable existence and stop bothering people.
  • Reply 55 of 128
    al_bundyal_bundy Posts: 1,525member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by indiekiduk View Post


    I thought it wasn't supposed to have HTC written on it, but its on the back. How is this google phone any different from the G1,G2 etc... BBC were saying Google have entered the hardware market with the Nexus, but it seems to me they have just remarketed the latest android hardware by HTC, and nothing has really changed. Confusing the market is not the way to increase sales.





    it's just a marketing stunt by HTC. the phone is locked to T-Mo because Droid is on VZW and AT&T is getting 5 more Android phones this year from Dell and Moto. and you can't piss off your partners by competing with them.



    no one knows HTC except for phone geeks, everyone knows Google
  • Reply 56 of 128
    al_bundyal_bundy Posts: 1,525member
    iphone has 32GB of NAND. N1 has 4GB
  • Reply 57 of 128
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post


    iphone has 32GB of NAND. N1 has 4GB



    I have no problem believing that, but show me a spec that says the 4GB chip is larger than the 32GB. Typically ram chips are very close in size, if they are the same technology... regardless of their capacity.
  • Reply 58 of 128
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 2,574member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AjitMD View Post


    Apple will have a hard time matching the hardware performance since it is tied to the Samsung ARM chipset. They stood still for too long without making radical changes with each model... Google did not stand still. Apple will have to enable multitasking, VoIP, Skype always on.



    Uh, how exactly is Apple tied to Samsung?



    And you do realize Apple is designing their own ARM chipsets which will probably be optimized for OS X. This will push the performance of the iPhone OS beyond what any other OS could achieve even with lesser technical specs.



    Sorry, but people who look at a list of tech specs and think it's automatically going to be a better user experience are in for a rude awakening.



    N1 has 512MB of memory vs. iPhone 256MB, however Android has a much larger memory footprint than OS X, <100MB for OS X, >200MB for Android



    N1 has an SD slot for extra storage, but not for applications, you're limited to 512MB of non-removable storage, 300MB+ of which is dedicated to the OS. So you're left with only 190MB of storage to install applications in. The applications I have installed on my iPhone take up 860MB.



    N1 has a 1GHz CPU vs. iPhone's 600MHz, and yet the iPhone interface is still more responsive and fluid.
  • Reply 59 of 128
    seafoxseafox Posts: 90member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


    What do you get from an mSD card slot? Do you swap the cards at home, or do you somehow try to swap the cards "in the field" and risk losing the cards? A card slot would be nice, but the cards are simply too small to swap in the field, I only think of the slot as a way to add memory, not as a way to play "disk swap" with easy to drop, easy to lose pinky nail cards.



    Well, like I said in the part of the post you didn't quote, and restated by g3pro...



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by g3pro View Post


    More space.

    Upgradability.



    Without buying a completely new unit.



    As for the "losing cards" business, that only happens if you are using the feature to actually swap cards in the field. mSD cards can be used simply as extra permanent memory in the device. I buy a phone in 2008 with 2 GB of built in memory, time passed, mSD card capacity increases and prices fall for flash memory, and in 2010 I can buy an 8 GB card for my phone for much less than a 4 GB was in 2008. I've increased the usefulness of the device and prolonged it's life for me without having to buy a whole new unit.



    There also is a note of security from data loss. Think of it this way:



    I have a GSM cell phone. I disabled the phone's internal phonebook memory so now all contacts are added to the SIM card. Why would I do this? Well lets say one day I drop my phone, it gets, wet, ect and goes dead, I can peel apart the pieces of my phone and assuming the SIM itself hasn't been damages take it out. The I go to a local electronics store and buy a new unlocked handset (I can even buy a prepaid handset since I'm a T-Mobile subscriber and their prepaid phones will work this way, too). I put my SIM into the new phone. BOOM, all my contacts are now on my new phone. If I'd been using the phone's built in NON REMOVABLE memory, I would have been S.O.L. since the phone is too damaged to run so I can try getting them off.



    This same scenario could play out on a smart phone with a mSD card. You can't pull the flash memory chips off the iPhone's board to save the contents. Neither can you take the flash chips off and give them to a friend temporarily so he can use or copy the contents off to a different device.
  • Reply 60 of 128
    asianbobasianbob Posts: 797member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by indiekiduk View Post


    Those are standard interative improvements and not ground breaking. How apple moved ahead with the first finger based phone operating system, fast and a great experience, proper internet browser, syncing and shopping experience as easy as the familar ipod. No one else has come close yet, Nokia are still resistive (can't do multitouch), Android is a hacked together clunky badly designed slow UI. Mobile hardware is good enough now, now it is all about the user experience of an easy to use phone, which Apple have nailed.



    Agreed that Apple has nailed the UI. I'd say 90% of it is very intuitive to use, but there remains some parts that weren't apparent just from using it. One that comes to mind is the video editing on my dad's 3GS. I Shot a random length video and then tapped on one frame as a start reference, but it didn't do anything that looked like it was starting the trim process. All it was doing was expanding when I tapped a frame and contracting when I tapped another. I actually had to look this one up online to figure out what I was doing wrong.



    In any case... But have you seen Android 2.1? It's far from the "clunky, badly designed slow UI" you call it. Maybe all the ones earlier than 2.0 that was true, but no longer. 5 or more homescreens (depends on who made the phone) where you get to decide what to put on them. How cluttered it gets is up to how the user personalizes it.



    It's not just boring row after row of icons. But there's the Rolodex-like screen that does that too. I personally do not have an N1 (waiting for the Verizon version), but from all the review/preview videos I have seen, not once has the OS slowed down or lagged any more than the 3GS. And all the actions they did to operate the N1 were what I would have instinctively tried to do in the first place.
Sign In or Register to comment.