iPad appears at Grammys, hospitals eye Apple's new hardware

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  • Reply 81 of 90
    tt92618tt92618 Posts: 444member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post


    you may need to download data unless you put up wifi in every corner of the hospital's winding hallways. and you have to be careful what you put up since some devices may interfere with heart monitors. my wife used to work in an ER and they had special cell phones they used.



    and the iPad will need to be HIPAA certified before any medical professional will use it



    This is a misunderstanding of what HIPAA is. HIPAA is federal legislation which protects the data privacy of patients. It is directed primarily at hospitals and staff, and governs who can have access to patient data and how that data is handled. Software systems used in health-care often provide reasonable safeguards for patient privacy, but the HIPAA legislation is targeted at the facilities and individual clinicians who use those systems, not at the systems themselves. HIPAA is not a certificating agency; there is no such thing as HIPAA certification for hardware devices.
  • Reply 82 of 90
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,215member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Foo2 View Post


    Will the touch interface work through rubber gloves?



    1. assuming they would use it whilst gloved and working on a patient



    2. there are styluses for the iphone which are likely to work with the ipad as well.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post


    In other words, they want to be able to run their own software without having to go through the App Store and giving up trade secrets in the process.



    i highly doubt that any app would be such a guarded trade secret that they are worried about the app store.



    Quote:



    Also they will need a Finder App for file browsing.



    why.



    any records a hospital is going to use will be off a central database that is accessed by the ER, ICU, pharmacy and so on. all they need is some kind of cloud client system to display the records. heck even Safari might work for that.
  • Reply 83 of 90
    esoomesoom Posts: 155member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post


    you may need to download data unless you put up wifi in every corner of the hospital's winding hallways. and you have to be careful what you put up since some devices may interfere with heart monitors. my wife used to work in an ER and they had special cell phones they used.



    and the iPad will need to be HIPAA certified before any medical professional will use it



    That's all bunk... All of it.



    I'm an RN, we threw all of that crap out of the window years ago...



    And I'm a traveling nurse, I've worked in a dozen hospitals in the last few years.



    All cell phones are allowed, Wifi devices, etc, and HIPPA is a law, not a regulatory agency that certifies anything.
  • Reply 84 of 90
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tt92618 View Post


    I think that one thing you miss, and that many other commentators miss, is the fact that many applications in health care settings are or could be web-based. It isn't necessary to develop and sell and app through the app store that targets the iPad as a client device.



    No I considered that but I don't think that necesserally makes the iPad the winner. The following points spring to mind:



    - if it's web based you could just use any browser and someone will undercut the iPad. It's about twice the price of a netbook so someone will make a cheaper version

    - no silverlight support. As far as I know as good as HTML 5 is it can't support multi touch and just uses click events for touch events

    - need to test code. Compiled languages have decent frameworks for testing, JavaScript currently does not. Anything medical needs to be perfect, will that be as easy in JavaScript



    I could go on but ultimately I think the iPad just isn't suited. Ultimately it's a closed device not a computer.
  • Reply 85 of 90
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by timgriff84 View Post


    No I considered that but I don't think that necesserally makes the iPad the winner. The following points spring to mind:



    - if it's web based you could just use any browser and someone will undercut the iPad. It's about twice the price of a netbook so someone will make a cheaper version

    - no silverlight support. As far as I know as good as HTML 5 is it can't support multi touch and just uses click events for touch events

    - need to test code. Compiled languages have decent frameworks for testing, JavaScript currently does not. Anything medical needs to be perfect, will that be as easy in JavaScript



    I could go on but ultimately I think the iPad just isn't suited. Ultimately it's a closed device not a computer.



    We'll have to agree to disagree here. I develop health-care applications for a living, most of which are used in large health-care enterprises, some of which are departmental. They are all web based. You are right in your assertion that these applications need to be as thoroughly debugged as possible, but your assertion that they must be 'perfect' is off the mark. The reality is that all software has bugs, and this is no more true of JS used in a client layer than it is of C# in the middle tier or running on a server. The difference is that the debugging tools for the compiled languages are more advanced, but that is the only difference. JS, as used on a client, is almost entirely involved with the manipulation of the UI for the client, and about the affordances and behaviors of a user interaction. You don't use JS to store data, or to handle heavy business logic. It isn't as big a concern as you credit it with.
  • Reply 86 of 90
    ssquirrelssquirrel Posts: 1,196member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Jetz View Post


    Wouldn't hospitals want a more powerful OS to be able to run various custom applications that they'll need on this device? I can't see it how they'll incorporate this thing in its current form. I am sure Apple will work something out for the health sector. I am curious to see what they come up with.



    As for Colbert's iPad demo....best product placement ever. Apple's going for the Colbert bump!



    How much heavy lifting does it really need to do to be able to pull up a patients charts, pull up an x ray, then let you flip to to the patient so they can look at it as well? Or leave a 30 pin connector dangling from a screen so you can plug it into a bigger screen and show the xray larger than the 10".



    The COlbert thing was hilarious. It took winning a Grammy to be cool w/his daughter tho
  • Reply 87 of 90
    If you watched the last Saturday Night Live (1.30.2010), there was an iPad reference. During one of the 10 second scenes shown between commercials (they usually show the studio preparing for the next skit), they showed the cameramen's 'set list'. On the upper right-hand corner of the list was "iPad"; I couldn't make out the rest of the note. (I am positive it wasn't 'iPod'.)



    My theory is Apple might have booked a commercial time slot just in case.
  • Reply 88 of 90
    His daughter is hot
  • Reply 89 of 90
    iposteriposter Posts: 1,560member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Foo2 View Post


    Will the touch interface work through rubber gloves?



    Step 1) Put on gloves.

    Step 2) Work with patient.

    Step 3) Remove gloves.

    Step 4) Do the 'paper work'.



    As someone who's attending a teaching hospital/university in an allied health field, IMHO anyone who's stupid enough to work on their iPad/iTouch/Laptop with their gloves still on after working with a patient deserves to catch MRSA or whatever else may be about.



    Trauma rooms excepted of course, but those have dedicated PCs with protective, wipeable covers over the keyboards.



    IRT the topic, I have to admit the iPad will probably be a hit with the medical field, once suitable apps are developed. I am currently using a iTouch to keep track of my clinical experiences with a database app. It works great for that purpose, the only bad thing about an iPad is that it won't fit in my scrubs pockets!



    FWIW the last time I visited my PCM in November she was already using a flip screen tablet/laptop to take notes on. (Before she put on gloves and made me turn and cough...;P)
  • Reply 90 of 90
    9to5Mac posts that 20% of doctors plan on buying an iPad within the year, 60% total are considering... (survey of 350 docs, so the margin of error might be large... anyways, it is a sizable number of iPads).



    http://9to5mac.com/epocrates-doctors...rvey-345965443
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