Apple removes 'Get a Mac' ads from site, finalizing end of campaign

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  • Reply 21 of 157
    damn_its_hotdamn_its_hot Posts: 1,193member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by defenderjarvis View Post


    There will be no more Mac TV ads.



    Just exactly what are you smokin' dude and where do I get some? Your remarks are some of the most ridiculous I have read in years. Actually I guess the Mac was on the way out right after it was introduced by your way of thinking. It has been such a short run (26 yrs so far) and the slow death you are speaking of - do you count this in decades remaining or years?
  • Reply 22 of 157
    blastdoorblastdoor Posts: 2,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by defenderjarvis View Post


    Untrue: I typed it on a dual-chip, eight-core (total), 16 logical core 2.93GHz Mac Pro.



    In my line of work as a creative pro, I will ALWAYS need the most powerful Mac model available, and if Steve deep-sixes the Mac, I will be left with no choice but to use a Windows PC (Ug!) which I've NEVER done in 22 years. (I'd rather chew glass.)



    The Mac is undergoing a slow death at the hands of Steve Jobs, who loves the iPad and iPhone OS and resents the Mac. Look at his history; he'll suddenly turn on a product he once loved and treat it and its product management team like s***. This is typical behavior for the man. Read some books.



    The Mac will eventually be killed. The process is already underway.



    I'm aware of people's perceptions of history, which is why I referenced the IIgs. Maybe that was too subtle.



    If Steve wanted to kill the mac, he never would have switched to Intel processors. The PPC was a great way to kill the Mac.



    The more likely story here is that Apple is segmenting the market between consumption devices and creation devices (between consumer <$1000 and pro >$1000), and the Mac is on the "pro" side of that divide. Consumer-oriented marketing looks different from pro-oriented marketing. How many mass TV campaigns do you see for AutoCad (or Final Cut Pro?)



    The one thing that apple may very well kill eventually, though, is the consumer-grade sub $1,000 macs. The Mac Mini and the MacBook might eventually disappear. We might also see the iMac become increasingly pro-like.



    On the other end, we might also see Apple introduce some kind of iHub or iHome or iBase -- sort of an iMac with a big hard drive and an iPhone OS, used for content and device management plus light content creation/manipulation. It could be used to sync and back-up all the more mobile iDevices you own plus act as an archive for your movies, photos, music, etc. Basically a device devoted to being iTunes (plus a little bit more).



    But the Mac isn't going away. It's just not going mass market in the way that the iPad/iPhone/iPod are.
  • Reply 23 of 157
    marktrekmarktrek Posts: 69member
    I actually like the Microsoft ads. They desperately have human beings claiming to be PCs, then they admit that Microsoft could not improve the operating system on their own. It had to be their idea. So it is "I'm a PC and Windows7 was my idea because Microsoft could not get the job done anymore."
  • Reply 24 of 157
    ilogicilogic Posts: 298member
    My favorite were the Christmas ones, but the whole campaign was great... and MS, you played right into the card, "I'm a PC"
  • Reply 25 of 157
    smallwheelssmallwheels Posts: 584member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by defenderjarvis View Post


    You watch.

    Mark my words. It will be killed.



    There will always be a Mac Pro but I think the laptops will be gone within two years. The iPad concept will expand into the new portable computer. As aps and the OS improve there will be no reason for laptops anymore.



    The Mac Pro will get a large track pad that has all of the gestures and movements on it which will control the content on the screen. It will also have a separate keyboard. The mouse will be killed. Soon enough there will be good enough voice control to supplement the need to type everything.
  • Reply 26 of 157
    msnlymsnly Posts: 378member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Smallwheels View Post


    There will always be a Mac Pro but I think the laptops will be gone within two years. The iPad concept will expand into the new portable computer. As aps and the OS improve there will be no reason for laptops anymore.



    The Mac Pro will get a large track pad that has all of the gestures and movements on it which will control the content on the screen. It will also have a separate keyboard. The mouse will be killed. Soon enough there will be good enough voice control to supplement the need to type everything.



    I think thats a few more than 2 years off, but thats just me. I don't see that being fully accomplished for atleast 3-6 years.
  • Reply 27 of 157
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post


    I'm aware of people's perceptions of history, which is why I referenced the IIgs. Maybe that was too subtle.



    If Steve wanted to kill the mac, he never would have switched to Intel processors. The PPC was a great way to kill the Mac.



    The more likely story here is that Apple is segmenting the market between consumption devices and creation devices (between consumer <$1000 and pro >$1000), and the Mac is on the "pro" side of that divide. Consumer-oriented marketing looks different from pro-oriented marketing. How many mass TV campaigns do you see for AutoCad (or Final Cut Pro?)



    The one thing that apple may very well kill eventually, though, is the consumer-grade sub $1,000 macs. The Mac Mini and the MacBook might eventually disappear. We might also see the iMac become increasingly pro-like.



    On the other end, we might also see Apple introduce some kind of iHub or iHome or iBase -- sort of an iMac with a big hard drive and an iPhone OS, used for content and device management plus light content creation/manipulation. It could be used to sync and back-up all the more mobile iDevices you own plus act as an archive for your movies, photos, music, etc. Basically a device devoted to being iTunes (plus a little bit more).



    But the Mac isn't going away. It's just not going mass market in the way that the iPad/iPhone/iPod are.



    In conference calls, Apple representatives have made it no secret that high-end Mac models and high-priced Apple Pro apps are disappointing in their sales.



    In one of these conference calls a rep called Apple's high-end (as described above) as "economically challenging" for Apple.



    When the switch from PPC to Intel was made, Steve wasn't interested in killing the Mac at that time. It's since iPhone OS and the iPad that he now resents the Mac and will do everything he can to treat it with "death by a thousand cuts."



    You don't see mass advertising campaigns (e.g. TV ads for a general audience) for high-end Macs or software because they appeal to a specialized (but lucrative) demographic.



    But point to me one Mac Pro or Final Cut Studio or Logic Studio print ad in a specialized pro video or audio magazine. Sony is all over these.



    The chances are greater that a high-end, specialized Mac like the Mac Pro will be killed vs. a low-end, broad-appeal Mac like a notebook, low-end iMac or Mac mini.



    But the process had begun. The Mac is slowly having its blood drained. Steve commands you to use Apple mobile devices now. The personal computer era is over. It will now be enforced.



    The Mac will get the microfloppy and Adobe Flash treatment -- you watch.
  • Reply 28 of 157
    bregaladbregalad Posts: 816member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by radiospace View Post


    I wish they'd done one last ad to say goodbye to those great characters. I always thought it should end with the PC (John Hodgman) saying, "I'm a Mac"...



    Justin Long: "No, you're a PC."

    Hodgman: "No, I'm a Mac. I switched. Now I just need to get the nerve up to tell my parents."



    and so on...



    While that would have been a great send-off for the actors it would have been absolutely and completely wrong!



    John and Justin were NOT users, they were anthropomorphic computers. They were hardware.



    John can't switch because he's a machine.



    (technically it's possible to install MacOS X on many generic PC boxes, but that's the absolute last thing Apple wants the general public to know)
  • Reply 29 of 157
    blastdoorblastdoor Posts: 2,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by defenderjarvis View Post


    In conference calls, Apple representatives have made it no secret that high-end Mac models and high-priced Apple Pro apps are disappointing in their sales.



    In one of these conference calls a rep called Apple's high-end (as described above) as "economically challenging" for Apple.



    When the switch from PPC to Intel was made, Steve wasn't interested in killing the Mac at that time. It's since iPhone OS and the iPad that he now resents the Mac and will do everything he can to treat it with "death by a thousand cuts."



    You don't see mass advertising campaigns (e.g. TV ads for a general audience) for high-end Macs or software because they appeal to a specialized (but lucrative) demographic.



    But point to me one Mac Pro or Final Cut Studio or Logic Studio print ad in a specialized pro video or audio magazine. Sony is all over these.



    The chances are greater that a high-end, specialized Mac like the Mac Pro will be killed vs. a low-end, broad-appeal Mac like a notebook, low-end iMac or Mac mini.



    But the process had begun. The Mac is slowly having its blood drained. Steve commands you to use Apple mobile devices now. The personal computer era is over. It will now be enforced.



    The Mac will get the microfloppy and Adobe Flash treatment -- you watch.



    Ok, so when will this happen exactly? I want to put it in my calendar so that I can plan for it. By what year can we expect there to be no mor macs?
  • Reply 30 of 157
    tofinotofino Posts: 697member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by defenderjarvis View Post


    You watch.



    The removal of this highly successful Mac TV ad campaign is step one in Steve Jobs' efforts to kill the personal computer.



    The "Campaign of the Decade" was also called by a Madison Avenue publication a "cultural phenomenon."



    There was no data-oriented or logical reason to discontinue this campaign. It worked EXTREMELY WELL and had plenty of head room for more and more ads. Viewers would watch the ads to see if the ad was a new one, and they wanted to find out because they were usually both funny and compelling.



    There was NO logical reason to end this highly-successful, praised and award winning TV ad campaign.



    Make no mistake, Steve Jobs has declared the personal computer era over. It's 100% iPhone OS from now on. He resents the Mac and the PC and wishes they would "go away" -- yesterday.



    But he has to answer to his management team, Board of Directors, large institutional investors, large customers, the press and The Street.



    So as much as he'd like to -- today -- give the order to all Mac product management teams to cease all development of the Mac, he can't (yet).



    He will accomplish it more gradually. By pulling marketing of the Mac resulting in a continuous decline in Mac sales, he can eventually go to his Board of Directors and say, "See? The Mac isn't selling." Or, "See? The Mac is now losing money for the company."



    Then he'll have the ammunition to deep-six the Mac.



    Jobs is too black-and-white. I love the iPod, iPhone and iPad, but see them as ADJUNCTS to my Mac Pro, whose power I depend on to make a living.



    But now the Mac only serves as an annoyance to Steve Jobs. Watch as it gets the microfloppy and Adobe Flash treatment.



    Mark my words. It will be killed.



    consider your words marked. now get a grip!
  • Reply 31 of 157
    emulatoremulator Posts: 251member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JasonQ13 View Post


    I don't see the need to take the ads down... disk space is cheap.



    Obviously you do not work in advertisement. Just one of the many reasons for you: copyright.
  • Reply 32 of 157
    Here's the ad I always wanted to see....but I guess we'll never see it now.



    Mac walks in and sees PC shining a flashlight all over the screen (your TV screen actually). As it moves across the screen, you see parts of icons appear and disappear.



    Mac asks PC what he's doing, and he responds he's searching for his icons. He then offer's Mac the use of his flashlight when he's done so Mac can find his icons too.



    Mac says "That's OK PC, I don't have a problem finding my icons".....or something like that!



    Of course this would have been much funnier a year ago before Windows 7.
  • Reply 33 of 157
    soskoksoskok Posts: 107member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post


    I'm aware of people's perceptions of history, which is why I referenced the IIgs. Maybe that was too subtle.



    If Steve wanted to kill the mac, he never would have switched to Intel processors. The PPC was a great way to kill the Mac.



    The more likely story here is that Apple is segmenting the market between consumption devices and creation devices (between consumer <$1000 and pro >$1000), and the Mac is on the "pro" side of that divide. Consumer-oriented marketing looks different from pro-oriented marketing. How many mass TV campaigns do you see for AutoCad (or Final Cut Pro?)



    The one thing that apple may very well kill eventually, though, is the consumer-grade sub $1,000 macs. The Mac Mini and the MacBook might eventually disappear. We might also see the iMac become increasingly pro-like.



    On the other end, we might also see Apple introduce some kind of iHub or iHome or iBase -- sort of an iMac with a big hard drive and an iPhone OS, used for content and device management plus light content creation/manipulation. It could be used to sync and back-up all the more mobile iDevices you own plus act as an archive for your movies, photos, music, etc. Basically a device devoted to being iTunes (plus a little bit more).



    But the Mac isn't going away. It's just not going mass market in the way that the iPad/iPhone/iPod are.







    Agree.



    I feel what SJ really after is a split in OS between consumer and developer. I bet iPhone OS will grow to run MacBook (whatever they will look like, touch screens etc.)



    I don't believe Macs are going anywhere. Apple will simply stop pushing them. There is now need to advertise to developers on tv channels. They consume different type of advertising.
  • Reply 34 of 157
    penchantedpenchanted Posts: 1,070member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by defenderjarvis View Post


    But the process had begun. The Mac is slowly having its blood drained. Steve commands you to use Apple mobile devices now. The personal computer era is over. It will now be enforced.



    The Mac will get the microfloppy and Adobe Flash treatment -- you watch.



    The Mac isn't going anywhere until after the iDevices can be set up and maintained without a computer. Even then, it would likely be a few years before Macs are removed from the market.



    Personally, I think Macs will be with us for a long time. Many believe that the iPad will deliver another huge halo that translates into additional Mac sales - this is not something that Apple will leave on the table.



    Companies change their ad campaigns all the time; this is no different.
  • Reply 35 of 157
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by radiospace View Post


    I wish they'd done one last ad to say goodbye to those great characters. I always thought it should end with the PC (John Hodgman) saying, "I'm a Mac"...



    Justin Long: "No, you're a PC."

    Hodgman: "No, I'm a Mac. I switched. Now I just need to get the nerve up to tell my parents."



    and so on...



    Love it! You should do a version for YouTube, that would be a great viral sendoff. It's hard to find a sub for Hodgman though.



    I think these were Apple's most successful ads. They had a great run (were even ported internationally) and it's a good time to retire them. Leave before you outwear your welcome. Still, they've entered into mass consciousness and left an indelible imprint.



    I've also really liked the iPhone ads and thought the new iPad ad was brilliant.
  • Reply 36 of 157
    christopher126christopher126 Posts: 4,366member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by radiospace View Post


    I wish they'd done one last ad to say goodbye to those great characters. I always thought it should end with the PC (John Hodgman) saying, "I'm a Mac"...



    Justin Long: "No, you're a PC."

    Hodgman: "No, I'm a Mac. I switched. Now I just need to get the nerve up to tell my parents."



    and so on...



    Very good!
  • Reply 37 of 157
    mactelmactel Posts: 1,275member
    The ad campaign was getting a bit old.



    The "I'm a PC" Windows 7 ads were tiresome from the beginning. I use Windows 7 and the snap-to feature is not something to boast about as they do in the commercials. The improved networking and multimedia features are though.
  • Reply 38 of 157
    Less than two years ago Apple went through a HUGE overhaul in the design of the MacBook Pro's. They knew iPad was coming down the pipeline, if they were going to call Macs, they wouldn't be continuing to make them better and better (10 hour battery life on a 5lb notebook?!).
  • Reply 39 of 157
    balsy2001balsy2001 Posts: 48member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by emulator View Post


    Obviously you do not work in advertisement. Just one of the many reasons for you: copyright.



    Doesn't apple own the copyright for the commercials? So why would that have anything to do with it?
  • Reply 40 of 157
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 5,988member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by defenderjarvis View Post


    In conference calls, Apple representatives have made it no secret that high-end Mac models and high-priced Apple Pro apps are disappointing in their sales.



    In one of these conference calls a rep called Apple's high-end (as described above) as "economically challenging" for Apple.



    When the switch from PPC to Intel was made, Steve wasn't interested in killing the Mac at that time. It's since iPhone OS and the iPad that he now resents the Mac and will do everything he can to treat it with "death by a thousand cuts."



    You don't see mass advertising campaigns (e.g. TV ads for a general audience) for high-end Macs or software because they appeal to a specialized (but lucrative) demographic.



    But point to me one Mac Pro or Final Cut Studio or Logic Studio print ad in a specialized pro video or audio magazine. Sony is all over these.



    The chances are greater that a high-end, specialized Mac like the Mac Pro will be killed vs. a low-end, broad-appeal Mac like a notebook, low-end iMac or Mac mini.



    But the process had begun. The Mac is slowly having its blood drained. Steve commands you to use Apple mobile devices now. The personal computer era is over. It will now be enforced.



    The Mac will get the microfloppy and Adobe Flash treatment -- you watch.



    And what will Apple use to develop/code/create the next iOS kernels? A Windows machine? Or do you think SJ will introduce some magical pixie-dust that will allow self-generating binary code?
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