Unibody 2010 Mac mini gets iFixit teardown

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 76
    ezduzitezduzit Posts: 158member
    just a uneducated observation.



    this new mini looks like a real winner and will surprise an awful lot of people. just the power supply alone is a blessing. i keep tripping over my old mini brick.
  • Reply 22 of 76
    cory bauercory bauer Posts: 1,286member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cgc0202 View Post


    If you disregard the screen, how does the Mac mini compare with the iMac in terms of its specifications, and also with the MacBook or even the entry level MacBook Pro. I am considering going to the same option that you have -- Mac mini as "desktop" and an iPad. I was hoping to wait for the next gen iPad though, but tempted. If I wait until next year for the iPad, I would need to have a notebook to replace my aging notebook.



    CGC



    As is usually the case, the entry-level Mini is identical in specs to the entry-level MacBook (plastic) except for the Mini having a 320GB hard drive instead of 250GB. The entry level MacBook Pro doubles the memory to 4GB, and that's about it. The entry level iMac on the other hand beats the pants off all of them, with a 3.06Ghz processor instead of 2.4Ghz, 4GB of memory instead of 2, 500GB hard drive instead of 320, and of course the gorgeous screen. The other Macs do have one advantage though: the 320M integrated graphics is supposedly half as slow as the 9400M graphics that the entry-level iMac still uses. The iMacs will probably get a refresh soon though, and I expect that will change.
  • Reply 23 of 76
    ruckerzruckerz Posts: 58member
    Can it play back 1080p mkv's?
  • Reply 24 of 76
    cory bauercory bauer Posts: 1,286member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by FuturePastNow View Post


    The answer to both of those questions is no. You cannot upgrade the CPU, and definitely not to a Core 2010 processor which requires a completely different Intel chipset. And the graphics chip isn't just a graphics chip, and thus cannot simply be replaced by a better one.



    So Apple will have to create a whole new motherboard when they move to i3s or i5s and the 330M graphics? It seems foolish of them to build a whole new product from scratch that can only use last-generation processors.
  • Reply 25 of 76
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,951member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post


    So Apple will have to create a whole new motherboard when they move to i3s or i5s and the 330M graphics? It seems foolish of them to build a whole new product from scratch that can only use last-generation processors.



    It's probably only the circuit board that changes. Remember that the old mini design had two entirely different architectures, most of the difference was just a new main board, and later, a new riser card and back panel.



    Making a new board isn't that big of a deal when you consider that Apple probably sells hundreds of thousands or millions of machines with any given circuit board. They'll design a new board when they decide to do an upgrade.
  • Reply 26 of 76
    drubledruble Posts: 62member
    Aww, it's so cute. It's like a little netbook without a screen, keyboard, or battery. Not sure what I would do with such a low power machine that is meant to stay at home, but kudos on the design.
  • Reply 27 of 76
    minderbinderminderbinder Posts: 1,703member
    Users still aren't going to care. It's still WAY overpriced and lousy performance. And most people don't care how big it is, they'd just rather have a decent affordable mac.



    Nice to see the improvements, but with the price increase and still crappy specs, the nice design just makes it suck a teeny bit less.
  • Reply 28 of 76
    drubledruble Posts: 62member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by minderbinder View Post


    Users still aren't going to care. It's still WAY overpriced and lousy performance. And most people don't care how big it is, they'd just rather have a decent affordable mac.



    Nice to see the improvements, but with the price increase and still crappy specs, the nice design just makes it suck a teeny bit less.



    I do have to agree. This is what you buy if you truly feel you can't live without an Apple computer and don't mind paying extra for the equal of a netbook. This will not live up to the expectations of anyone planning to do much more than Email, web surfing, and typing documents. Unless of course you can get iPhone apps on it. It should be powerful enough to run those pretty decently. It's clever in design and size, but needs more power. This would be great as a starter computer for children though. Of couse there are cheaper as powerful/more powerful options, but it is an Apple to say the least.
  • Reply 29 of 76
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,274member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ruckerz View Post


    Can it play back 1080p mkv's?



    I don't see why not. I ripped one of my Blu-Rays using software for that purpose, and it plays through my Mac Pro out through the ATI card to my monitor. No reason why this should be different.
  • Reply 30 of 76
    macheimachei Posts: 83member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by druble View Post


    I do have to agree. This is what you buy if you truly feel you can't live without an Apple computer and don't mind paying extra for the equal of a netbook. This will not live up to the expectations of anyone planning to do much more than Email, web surfing, and typing documents. Unless of course you can get iPhone apps on it. It should be powerful enough to run those pretty decently. It's clever in design and size, but needs more power. This would be great as a starter computer for children though. Of couse there are cheaper as powerful/more powerful options, but it is an Apple to say the least.



    I beg to differ. While I'm in agreement that given the availability of non-mac options whose specs outperform this machine at a lower price point, you aren't being fair in saying that it can't do much more than email, surfing and docs. My current MacBook Pro has specs that aren't this high, and it's my primary computer, used for everything from email to docs, to music creation in Logic, to photo manipulation in Aperture. It can do some pretty heavy lifting. Is it a mac pro? Of course not. But I don't believe it's fair to say that this computer is just a "starter for children". I'm sure it can handle quite a bit more than apps.
  • Reply 31 of 76
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ruckerz View Post


    Can it play back 1080p mkv's?



    It's a new Mac, so yes. How could their be any question with a 2.4 C2D and Nvida 320M?





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


    It's probably only the circuit board that changes. Remember that the old mini design had two entirely different architectures, most of the difference was just a new main board, and later, a new riser card and back panel.



    Making a new board isn't that big of a deal when you consider that Apple probably sells hundreds of thousands or millions of machines with any given circuit board. They'll design a new board when they decide to do an upgrade.



    Remove the ODD and there will be room for the Core-i and dGPU.





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by druble View Post


    Aww, it's so cute. It's like a little netbook without a screen, keyboard, or battery. Not sure what I would do with such a low power machine that is meant to stay at home, but kudos on the design.



    Netbook with the performance of a 13" MacBook Pro. I'd love to see that.
  • Reply 32 of 76
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,274member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by druble View Post


    I do have to agree. This is what you buy if you truly feel you can't live without an Apple computer and don't mind paying extra for the equal of a netbook. This will not live up to the expectations of anyone planning to do much more than Email, web surfing, and typing documents. Unless of course you can get iPhone apps on it. It should be powerful enough to run those pretty decently. It's clever in design and size, but needs more power. This would be great as a starter computer for children though. Of couse there are cheaper as powerful/more powerful options, but it is an Apple to say the least.



    I guess you two guys must be right, and the first three reviews out must be wrong. I suppose they're ALL Mac fanboys:



    http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2365157,00.asp



    http://reviews.cnet.com/desktops/app...-34118624.html

    http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/...ZnoHAD9GCHU1G0





    Yes, it's not THE most powerful machine. And expect to pay a bit more for Apple's superior engineering.
  • Reply 33 of 76
    masternavmasternav Posts: 442member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by druble View Post


    I do have to agree. This is what you buy if you truly feel you can't live without an Apple computer and don't mind paying extra for the equal of a netbook. This will not live up to the expectations of anyone planning to do much more than Email, web surfing, and typing documents. Unless of course you can get iPhone apps on it. It should be powerful enough to run those pretty decently. It's clever in design and size, but needs more power. This would be great as a starter computer for children though. Of couse there are cheaper as powerful/more powerful options, but it is an Apple to say the least.



    ...given that (I'lll wager good money on this and win) you've not used one yet, you are basing your valuation merely on specs/features and not actual use. This is where so many arguments fail miserably in the consumer electronics market. Consumers are slowly getting wise to the "feature" or "spec" over-burden on devices and looking more closely at the actual experience. This is something that Apple banked on (I speculate) when they released the iPad. And I think based on my own experiences with netbooks - they mostly are just smaller, crappier laptops. Email, web-surfing and typing documents are moving rapidly in the direction of the iPad or iPad-like device.



    The assumption of "I know, based on my own personal experience" more than Apple about what configuration of the Mac Mini will sell the best seems a trifle silly as a claim. You categorically don't, so the claim is doubly damning. As Apple is in the market to make a good profit off of the device, its form, function and characteristics have been thoroughly thought out and presented (as you see in the article) for the consuming public. There is a reason why you are merely a blog poster and not the CEO of a major electronics company (directed to as many as to whom it applies). Obviously you don't get it, and probably won't buy it. Apple is obviously OK with that. This will make a perfect interactive kiosk device, it will make a fine media box, and it will make a nice upgrade to several home PC systems in desperate need of getting away from Windows.

  • Reply 34 of 76
    masternavmasternav Posts: 442member
    no one in this forum has asked the crucial question, which one should ALWAYS ask - WHY? Why did Apple go this way with the Mac Mini? What are the key drivers? In light of just recently introducing the iPad, for example. What does this mean for Apple and their vision of personal computing for the average consumer. Because these are the key drivers behind what Apple does and how they make their decisions. Figure out where Apple is going, figure out what Apple's vision of the future of personal computing is and you get a window into the mindset and drivers behind the design and execution of their products.



    But mostly just think. Think, ponder and give your fingers a rest so your brain can grapple with these concepts - BEFORE you type

  • Reply 35 of 76
    stevegmustevegmu Posts: 539member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by druble View Post


    I do have to agree. This is what you buy if you truly feel you can't live without an Apple computer and don't mind paying extra for the equal of a netbook. This will not live up to the expectations of anyone planning to do much more than Email, web surfing, and typing documents. Unless of course you can get iPhone apps on it. It should be powerful enough to run those pretty decently. It's clever in design and size, but needs more power. This would be great as a starter computer for children though. Of couse there are cheaper as powerful/more powerful options, but it is an Apple to say the least.



    I have a 10 year old iBook that can handle e-mail, web-surfing and typing documents without a problem. It can even play games. I'll wager the average computer user does no more with their machines. I imagine a brand new Mini has more than enough power and speed to handle those tasks with ease.
  • Reply 36 of 76
    sheffsheff Posts: 1,407member
    Looks stunning. Very glad that mac mini is still alive (and still overpriced).
  • Reply 37 of 76
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by masternav View Post


    ...given that (I'lll wager good money on this and win) you've not used one yet, you are basing your valuation merely on specs/features and not actual use. This is where so many arguments fail miserably in the consumer electronics market. Consumers are slowly getting wise to the "feature" or "spec" over-burden on devices and looking more closely at the actual experience. This is something that Apple banked on (I speculate) when they released the iPad. And I think based on my own experiences with netbooks - they mostly are just smaller, crappier laptops. Email, web-surfing and typing documents are moving rapidly in the direction of the iPad or iPad-like device.



    The assumption of "I know, based on my own personal experience" more than Apple about what configuration of the Mac Mini will sell the best seems a trifle silly as a claim. You categorically don't, so the claim is doubly damning. As Apple is in the market to make a good profit off of the device, its form, function and characteristics have been thoroughly thought out and presented (as you see in the article) for the consuming public. There is a reason why you are merely a blog poster and not the CEO of a major electronics company (directed to as many as to whom it applies). Obviously you don't get it, and probably won't buy it. Apple is obviously OK with that. This will make a perfect interactive kiosk device, it will make a fine media box, and it will make a nice upgrade to several home PC systems in desperate need of getting away from Windows.







    Also when comparing specs you need to factor in the impact of the operating system. I have a Dell Mini 9, that runs like treacle when using MS XP Home; making for a frustrating experience indeed. However, when it runs Mac OS X on exactly the same hardware it is a completely different experience: snappy, responsive and a joy to use.



    Disclaimer: I am an Apple fanboy, but in my previous life I have written retail banking apps for MS Windows 1, 2, 95 and XP; for me Mac OS X is a huge differentiating factor.
  • Reply 38 of 76
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post


    So Apple will have to create a whole new motherboard when they move to i3s or i5s and the 330M graphics? It seems foolish of them to build a whole new product from scratch that can only use last-generation processors.



    I see this product (the new Mini) as prep for 2011 launches from AMD and Intel. That would be Sandy Bridge from Intel and AMDs Fusion line. That would put a quad core processor into the machine in an SoC implementation.



    This new Mini combined with the coming SoC generation will have a long and impressive life.





    Dave
  • Reply 39 of 76
    pvguypvguy Posts: 9member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by stevegmu View Post


    I imagine a brand new Mini has more than enough power and speed to handle those tasks with ease.



    I have the last generation mini as the main mac, and it's fine. it does everything I need. It could do everything I do at work too. CPU power hasn't been an issue for years. I got 7 years out of my 2002 Quicksilver with dual 1 Ghz processors, and although I added hard drive space, the processors were fast enough. New software than was Intel only what finally forced me to upgrade.



    i spend more time waiting on the internet (and I have a 100 Mb connection) than waiting on the mini's hardware. It's not even worth upgrading the HD to 7200 rpm.
  • Reply 40 of 76
    bwikbwik Posts: 564member
    So it has a Core 2 Duo, huh. Very 2007.
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