Windows Phone 7 developers fear platform flop

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  • Reply 181 of 291
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TNSF View Post






    What the hell, dude? I won't be able to sleep for a week! Not cool.
  • Reply 182 of 291
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by 1337_5L4Xx0R View Post


    Microsoft is rumoured to be readying a major Windows Phone 7 update. While it might seem a bit odd to update a relatively fresh OS, it appears that WP7 simply isn?t doing too well against Android and iOS devices.

    The update should include some form of multitasking, as well as copy/paste support. One might say that these crucial features should have been included from the get-go, but then again it?s a clear case of better late than never.



    In addition, the update should include Bing turn-by-turn directions and other improvements, as well as custom ringer support.



    I have to call BS on that. You're talking about features that took Apple 3 years to implement... and they control the hardware as well as software.



    The impression I get is that Microsoft are throwing a lot of man hours at WP7, and from that they have an accelerated development cycle compared to other Microsoft products... but all of those features in just a few months of development... I just don't think it's possible. Certainly not when they need to test across multiple devices.



    I think they will do Copy+Paste early next year (Jan/Feb) then stick to their 12 month release cycles.
  • Reply 183 of 291
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by chronster View Post


    Their "do more with less clicks" sales pitch is an appealing one. This seems to be what your average person cares most about when it comes to smart phones. The learning curve on even an iphone can confuse, frustrate, and infuriate some customers. I know it seems silly, but some people really don't get along with technology very well, and it's these people that the sales pitch is working with.



    I don't think anyone expected long lines and high demand for the first WP7 devices. The whole thing has potential though and won't just die off like kin did.



    Are you serious "learning curve on even an iphone can confuse, frustrate and infuriate customers".

    What customers are you writing about, single cell bacteria perhaps ?

    My youngest when she was 6 could use an iPhone after about 5 mins. She simply watched us and caught on very quickly. Perhaps that is why there is no hard copy user manuals, none are needed.

    Please refrain from lying, because that is what you are doing, "steep learning curve", I can't help from not chuckling at the sheer stupidity of your comment.
  • Reply 184 of 291
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by chronster View Post


    Their "do more with less clicks" sales pitch is an appealing one. This seems to be what your average person cares most about when it comes to smart phones. The learning curve on even an iphone can confuse, frustrate, and infuriate some customers. I know it seems silly, but some people really don't get along with technology very well, and it's these people that the sales pitch is working with.



    I don't think anyone expected long lines and high demand for the first WP7 devices. The whole thing has potential though and won't just die off like kin did.



    Are you serious "learning curve on even an iphone can confuse, frustrate and infuriate customers".

    What customers are you writing about, single cell bacteria perhaps ?

    My youngest when she was 6 could use an iPhone after about 5 mins. She simply watched us and caught on very quickly. Perhaps that is why there is no hard copy user manuals, none are needed.

    Please refrain from lying, because that is what you are doing, "steep learning curve", I can't help from not chuckling at the sheer stupidity of your comment.
  • Reply 185 of 291
    kotatsukotatsu Posts: 1,010member
    It took Android a while to get going and now it's market leader. It's way, way too early to make any judgement on the success or failure of Windows Phone.



    Stating the obvious too but MS have the pockets to keep pushing this for as long as it takes.
  • Reply 186 of 291
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post


    Stating the obvious too but MS have the pockets to keep pushing this for as long as it takes.



    I am sure they will.



    But if you are a developer. And you have some vague interest in paying your mortgage / bar-bill.



    What *exactly* would motivate you to invest time and money in creating apps for the WP7 platform.



    C.
  • Reply 187 of 291
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SevenInchHeels View Post


    Heh. I saw someone with an Apple computer the other day (Starbucks) and I thought to myself. Wait, Apple makes computer? If you have a job, you just don't see Apple computers. They've pretty much been banished from the enterprise. Xserve sales are booming though!





    Not true. We are an enterprise corp(mutual fund) here using all Macs.. you obviously haven't used OSX server. Costs are far less than the Licensing fiasco Microsoft uses..



    and if you were in a Starbucks, Im surprised you didn't realize EVERYone in there uses a mac..



    back on topic.. Microsoft just hasn't stepped up to the plate when it comes to ANY of there products.. Vista; flop, win7; getting a little better.. WinMo EPIC fail.. it took how long before an update was even available.. YEARS....
  • Reply 188 of 291
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post


    I am sure they will.



    But if you are a developer. And you have some vague interest in paying your mortgage / bar-bill.



    What *exactly* would motivate you to invest time and money in creating apps for the WP7 platform.



    C.



    There could potentially be a bunch of reasons.



    One of the developers in the article simply wanted a WP7 device but realised he was missing the app that would let him call his girl long distance, so he wrote it himself.



    The skill set for WP7 development overlaps with a lot of other Microsoft technologies. This counts for a couple of different points.



    Firstly time spent on WP7 development is going to count toward getting you a job if you decide to go back to working for the man instead of being an App developer.



    Secondly the cost of entry into WP7 could be a lot lower if you already possess the skills required.



    I've actually seen this first hand with developers starting on iOS not only had to buy a Mac, but they had never even touched a Mac. It took them months to get up the same level of proficiency with iOS development as they were already at with Windows.



    All that said, if you are one of the special few that have an idea for a killer application that is going to get 20 million hits in the iStore then no amount of WP7 time saving is going to be worth it. Sure, if the application is that good it's going to be economically feasible to write it for WP7 as well... just not until the iOS and Android versions have been released!



    Whatever the reasons are it doesn't seem to have stopped the developers. There were something like 10000 **EDIT it's actually 15K** registered WP7 developers the last time I heard.
  • Reply 189 of 291
    kotatsu:

    Quote:

    way too early to make any judgement on the success or failure of Windows Phone.



    I'm clairvoyant



    WP will fail until MS gives it away for free, making money solely off apps in their app store and 'cloud services.'



    Android will dominate at over 70% marketshare.



    Apple becomes a bit player that commands a disproportionate percentage of profits.



    ##########################################



    Apple: $$$, luxury, integration, run by irritating control freaks, well marketed.



    Linux: Free, bulletproof, open source, developer friendly, transparent, more than 'good enough'



    WebOS: Very good, day late, dollar short, last gasp effort. May show up in printers and tablets some day soon.



    RIM: does email.



    Meego: See Android, far fewer developers.



    WP: ???



    Please fill in the blanks.
  • Reply 190 of 291
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by 1337_5L4Xx0R View Post


    WP will fail until MS gives it away for free



    I think they basically are giving it away for "free".



    It's licensed for something like $15. Apparently a combination of easier management & deployment, Microsoft handling device testing and law suits against Android manufacturers for infringing Microsoft patents makes WP7 a cheaper alternative than "free" Android.
  • Reply 191 of 291
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mbmcavoy View Post


    Actually, a dispassionate review isn't extremely anything. It's "meh." \



    Not necessarily. As long as it's not motivated by personal feelings (one way or the other), it's dispassionate. I could write a really positive review that is objective and not motivated by my personal feelings, and it would be dispassionate. So if I did a feature compare and said that something was lacking or feature-rich based on the evidence, that would be dispassionate. If I wrote a review of Win phones and said ?it?s nothing to get excited about? (i.e., "meh") because i happen to like iOS and don?t want to see it getting good coverage (but also don?t want to be too obviously a fan boy), it wouldn?t be dispassionate...
  • Reply 192 of 291
    cmf2cmf2 Posts: 1,427member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DocNo42 View Post


    I don't care, and I sincerely doubt, Apple cares about capping anyones growth.



    Steve has repeatedly said this, and all their actions clearly demonstrate that Apple believes this: If you build the best products in the world, people will seek them out and things like profit and market share will take care of themselves.



    I think this is refreshing and directly applicable to Apple's success. They aren't worried about their competitors, they are worried about their customers.



    Many companies and posters in forums like this could do well to understand the difference.



    Sure they take pot shots at competitors from time to time. Who says work has to always be boring But to infer from the occasional pot shot that Jobs obsesses about Android "eating their lunch" is just insane. If it helps you sleep at night, run with it - but there are far more interesting things to fantasize about



    I never said Apple wanted to cap anyone elses growth. I said Apple fans should want WP7 to succeed as a means of capping Androids growth. I repeatably stated that marketshare is not a major concern of Apple's and there is no reason for it to be, but fanboys of all stripes seem to care a lot about it.
  • Reply 193 of 291
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post


    I have to call BS on that. You're talking about features that took Apple 3 years to implement... and they control the hardware as well as software.



    The impression I get is that Microsoft are throwing a lot of man hours at WP7, and from that they have an accelerated development cycle compared to other Microsoft products... but all of those features in just a few months of development... I just don't think it's possible. Certainly not when they need to test across multiple devices.



    I think they will do Copy+Paste early next year (Jan/Feb) then stick to their 12 month release cycles.



    Apple of the past was working on older hardware, naturally, which forced different design decisions. Further, they had to establish for themselves how to spend space, power and processor cycles in a way that MS would not. I think it is entirely possible that MS' development time will be radically shorter than Apple's was. Of course, if all they do is catch up, they'll end as also-rans.
  • Reply 194 of 291
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by melgross View Post


    You really should look things up before saying what you think the meaning is. It's easy enough.



    Exactly! A dispassionate review is an unbiased review. It is entirely possible for an unbiased device review to weigh all the evidence, and still reach a conclusion that strongly advocates, or conversely strongly argues against, the merits of a particular device.



    And, in the context of the word's use inside Appleinsider's article at the beginning of this thread, I do not think the editor actually intended to say that the reviews were largely unbiased. Don't get me wrong, I don't think Appleinsider was attempting to accuse the reviewers of bias either. I simply think that an evaluation of the reviewers' bias simply was never meant to come into the discussion at all.



    Rather, my personal experience in reading comprehension, combined with a little bit of reading in between the lines when an incongruous word popped up ('dispassionate', given the context of the surrounding paragraph), led me to conclude that the article's editor intended to say that the reviews (unbiased or not, it's really irrelavent) led to mostly noncommittal-to-negative conclusions.
  • Reply 195 of 291
    This will be a day long remembered. It has seen the end of Windows Phone 7, it will soon see the end of Microsoft.
  • Reply 196 of 291
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mister Snitch View Post


    One word:



    Zune.



    Better word:



    Windows.

  • Reply 197 of 291
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post


    ... It's way, way too early to make any judgement on the success or failure of Windows Phone.



    A strange comment, considering your prediction of Apple's "exit from the PC market altogether"
  • Reply 198 of 291
    alfiejralfiejr Posts: 1,524member
    WP7 is very comparable to the Zune - decent product with some nice features, but simply too late. the train has already left the station, and it ain't coming back.



    how much PMP market share does the Zune actually have? 5%? that's where WP7 will wind up too. MS will continue to improve and globalize it, so it will become respectable. and pour money into keeping it going. so it won't die. MS probably will subsidize developers to offer all the important apps. it will become MS' "hobby." to much derision from AI, no doubt.



    there is a long range hope for WP7 - all the anti-Android litigation by Apple, Oracle, and MS. Android may wind up in a serious legal mess, and become more expensive and/or limited as an outcome. but that is years down the road. that might open the door to Windows Phone one day.



    and there is also one other very possible wildcard - MS makes a deal, or even "merges" with Nokia and WP7 replaces Symbian for the entire Nokia lineup. actually, i bet this happens. Elop is a MS plant.
  • Reply 199 of 291
    W7 phone makes me wanna line dance in the MS store. Goodbye Zune, hello zunephone!
  • Reply 200 of 291
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by 1337_5L4Xx0R View Post


    kotatsu:





    I'm clairvoyant



    WP will fail until MS gives it away for free, making money solely off apps in their app store and 'cloud services.'



    Android will dominate at over 70% marketshare.



    Apple becomes a bit player that commands a disproportionate percentage of profits.



    ##########################################



    Apple: $$$, luxury, integration, run by irritating control freaks, well marketed.



    Linux: Free, bulletproof, open source, developer friendly, transparent, more than 'good enough'



    WebOS: Very good, day late, dollar short, last gasp effort. May show up in printers and tablets some day soon.



    RIM: does email.



    Meego: See Android, far fewer developers.



    WP: ???



    Please fill in the blanks.





    WP7 and a tablet might have a good chance if they got Mobile office to print, a real web browser, and full functionality with their cloud. this needs to be done NOW not after everyone else does it better.

    oh and better battery life....
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