Apple targeting Dec. 13 launch of Mac App Store - rumor

2

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 58
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    I assume you already know this but when I saw the message you are responding to I thought what the hell time capsule was never intended to be a media server. If that was Apples intention they came up awfully short.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by benice View Post


    I agree. Some of the Window/HP media stack and the QNAP NAS options are promising (QNAP might be ARM based already) but would be nice if it compared with an Apple designed 2, 4, 6 drive solution depending on the type of home and budget you have.



    I've been on again off again looking at ways to setup a home media server and frankly Apple has nothing to really offer here. The Mini server could be pressed into service here but from the hardware standpoint it is less than ideal. As you point out many require more than two drives.

    Quote:

    As much as cloud hosting looks like the future, I just can't see it as realistic with current connection speeds, remote storage pricing and the fact that non-incremental backups are likely to take days.



    These are all issues but there is one item that is even bigger, that is security. Nothing on the net is beyound being hacked so it is no place for an individual nor a business to place sensitive data. Followed close by speed as you rightfully point out. As we move to solid state local storage the delta between that and the cloud just becomes bigger.

    Quote:

    In home storage isn't finished yet and it's got a brighter future if they gave it the iOS treatment.



    With regards to that I've considered just building my own Linux based server and to be done with it. The problem one runs into is "issues" of working correctly with Apples innovations like iTunes. I probably should start hanging out in some of the AppleTV forums to see how much of a problem it is to get ATV to work with third party servers.



    Working means that the server does more than just handles media, it would also need to be a backup device, an SCM server and other things. I was actually saddened to see XServe leave the line up as that would have gone into the cellar nicely. Well if it wasn't for the price. That is the final issue, if Apple comes out with such a home server it needs to be reasonably priced. This isn't a platform for fancy design, it has to fit in with the cobwebs and other unmentionables in the cellar.
  • Reply 22 of 58
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    As much as ?the cloud? get talks up and as much as we use it without even realizing it, storing all your media on the cloud, and only on the cloud is very far from being a feasible consumer reality.



    I think people would pay Drobo prices for an Apple Home Server that gave them the interaction Windows Home Server. I?d think the Cortex-A8 and iOS would be sufficient for this task considering Drobo used the same ARMv5 in the Time Capsule, and HP used an Atom for their Windows-based solution (which is pretty good for a Windows OS product).



    It would be nice if this HomeServer also served user profiles, updates and centralized home folders for Macs as well as handling activation and serving as a synching home to iPads (promoting it from being just a companion product).
  • Reply 23 of 58
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mitchell_pgh View Post


    I am 100% for the App Store, as long as I can continue to download non-App Store apps IF I WISH.



    There is no question about that. Jobs stood up on that stage and said that this store is totally an option, not a requirement. It is designed for those little guys, the new Steve Jobs of the world, working in the basement etc that can't afford the cost of large scale advertising, servers, and such to compete with the big boys. Hell you google photo editing Mac and you are likely to get adobe Photoshop as the first 5 pages, mainly because goggle let's them pay for placement at the top of searches. But on the Mac App Store, where adobe is likely to be absent since they dont need the support, you could find pixelmator, gimp etc.





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gctwnl View Post


    Are they rushing something out of the door just to be in time for X-mas?



    Rushing out the store isn't the same as rushing out the contents. Much of the structure is likely copied from the iOS store. And many apps probably only needed to have a change in installers to work in the system, although i've seen quite a few that seem to be using an Apple style installer already so perhaps they needed no changes at all.



    All we seem to be waiting for is the app to access the app store.



    And there is a tactical advantage to getting it out now. Christmas buyers who are on the fence about switch g could be coaxed over by the notion that Apple makes it easy for you to find the software you want, even if they don't make it. Unlike on the PC . . .
  • Reply 24 of 58
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacApfel View Post


    I also completely agree. The App Store will be absolutely massive. Not only for the above mentioned reasons. But also because of the ease of installing software. For the average user, this is nearly a sole argument for switching to the Mac platform. - And developers will love it too! In principle, this is the perfect system for not having pirate copies!



    Many small to medium sized developers are going to absolutely love the App Store. It removes a considerable amount of overhead. Marketing, application packaging, activation, etc. etc. It lets them focus on what they do best. I'm guessing the medium to larger organizations are going to want to negotiate the 70/30 split as they have more to lose.
  • Reply 25 of 58
    onhkaonhka Posts: 1,025member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    As much as ?the cloud? get talks up and as much as we use it without even realizing it, storing all your media on the cloud, and only on the cloud is very far from being a feasible consumer reality.



    I would agree 100%.



    All it takes is
    • Slow, erratic or no internet service or

    • Brown-, black-outs or no power

    and there is no work.



    And in this day in age, hell a natural disaster or even a war is not out of the question.



    However, as an integral part of a steaming, cloud computing or backup service, it has its benefits. But not having your primary data on your computer or in close proximity to your working environment is only asking for issues.



    Has anyone seen or heard Steve Jobs talk, speak, present or written anything about cloud computing. I haven't? Perhaps somebody can send a link or two.



    Until then, the concerns are literally a figment of one's imagination.



    By the way, the only thing that I can find re Job's on the Mac App Store, is that:
    • The App Store will allow users to download and install applications with just one click, like on the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad.

    • Like on iOS devices, software will be remotely hosted by Apple. But once applications are installed, they will run locally, like traditional software.

    • In both Lion and Snow Leopard, users will not be tied to the App Store for new software. Jobs said that the App Store will simply be an option for both developers and users, suggesting Mac OS X will not become a "walled garden" like iOS.

    I suspect that the first Apps that will appear will be extensions of the current iPhone and iPad apps. Obviously, they will have more functionality; which is something that we all have been requesting.



    It is highly unlikely that the powerhouse applications of Adobes Creative Suite or Microsoft's Office won't be available. There just hasn't been enough time. Not only should the developer have done his homework, i.e., the necessary research, market analysis, proper coding, testing, marketing/pricing/sales plans, etc., the software will be vetted and tested by Apple before Apple makes it available on their Mac App Store.



    However, the idea that without thinking about it, the process of acquiring, installing and updating Mac apps from the users' as well as the developers' will not be fraught with issues such as, are you legally entitled to, and is your hardware configured as such to run the software. It just will or it won't.
  • Reply 26 of 58
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Onhka View Post


    I would agree 100%.



    All it takes is
    • Slow, erratic or no internet service or

    • Brown-, black-outs or no power

    and there is no work.



    And in this day in age, hell a natural disaster or even a war is not out of the question.



    I don't agree. I believe Internet access at the home will soon be viewed as a standard utility (on par with electricity and running water). For many businesses, it's already there. If the Internet goes down at my place of business, everything stops.
  • Reply 27 of 58
    onhkaonhka Posts: 1,025member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mitchell_pgh View Post


    I don't agree. I believe Internet access at the home will soon be viewed as a standard utility (on par with electricity and running water). For many businesses, it's already there. If the Internet goes down at my place of business, everything stops.



    What don't you agree about?
  • Reply 28 of 58
    irelandireland Posts: 17,785member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ascii View Post


    I think this is all about reliability. Removal of the optical drive = better hardware reliability. App curating = better software reliability. The Mac will become "the computer that never crashes" and get even more converts from Windows.



    Keep dreaming.
  • Reply 29 of 58
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mitchell_pgh View Post


    I don't agree. I believe Internet access at the home will soon be viewed as a standard utility (on par with electricity and running water). For many businesses, it's already there. If the Internet goes down at my place of business, everything stops.



    Not in the U.S. That's really all that matters when it comes to Apple.
  • Reply 30 of 58
    You guys really think a "home media server" is a vital product of the future? I'd file that under Jobs' "hobby" folder, maybe, but to be honest: only a bunch of geeks like us would buy it Apple prices. I can't see anyone in my extended family or most of the people I work with paying a premium for something their family computer does.
  • Reply 31 of 58
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cliphord View Post


    You guys really think a "home media server" is a vital product of the future? I'd file that under Jobs' "hobby" folder, maybe, but to be honest: only a bunch of geeks like us would buy it Apple prices. I can't see anyone in my extended family or most of the people I work with paying a premium for something their family computer does.



    I agree. Evidence: Microsoft's home server business is being neglected and dying.



    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/12...vail_hp_walks/
  • Reply 32 of 58
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacApfel View Post


    I also completely agree. The App Store will be absolutely massive. Not only for the above mentioned reasons. But also because of the ease of installing software. For the average user, this is nearly a sole argument for switching to the Mac platform. - And developers will love it too! In principle, this is the perfect system for not having pirate copies!



    Curation also begets the new Apple Customer: Gone are the days of a DIYer who could write a bit of HyperCard (or like me, PERL and ObjC on NeXTSTEP), and and enter the masses who want the '1click shopping' experience.



    This is not a bad thing... this is mainstreaming SW. MS kept the cloak of wizardry on most tech heads with registry entries and DLLs updates.... Apple allows the techheads to get out of daily 'user support (I have to avoid calling my mom a 'Luser' with her not quite hearing the 'L'), and focus on doing other stuff.



    I've stated in other forums, The App Store helps with the acquisition of small bits of code for a less than a Applebee's Meal at the Mall price..., sort of a 'macro' version of 'micropayments' (see Alan Cox). Figure that driving to the Apple Store or BBY or Fry's causes you to get the munchies, let alone gas prices, opportunity costs and other things... buying software for $15 a seat at a time (assuming that's the price for a big ticket item like OmniWeb or Pages), further unravelling the MS model of a $500 retail for MS-Office.



    [Note that MS is now going to the cloud... a nice thought, but I think that 'decoupled' computing will still have value for several years, especially in 'productivity' apps... MS is in a race for the bottom with Google, on Google's turf... I don't see Value Prop for MS in this race... the virtue of selling HW instead of ads].
  • Reply 33 of 58
    asciiascii Posts: 5,936member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cliphord View Post


    You guys really think a "home media server" is a vital product of the future? I'd file that under Jobs' "hobby" folder, maybe, but to be honest: only a bunch of geeks like us would buy it Apple prices. I can't see anyone in my extended family or most of the people I work with paying a premium for something their family computer does.



    I agree, I don't think Apple is heading towards a home server. They are more about an "anything can stream to anything" model. Even the iPad can stream to the Apple TV now.
  • Reply 34 of 58
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hypercommunist View Post


    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cliphord View Post


    You guys really think a "home media server" is a vital product of the future? I'd file that under Jobs' "hobby" folder, maybe, but to be honest: only a bunch of geeks like us would buy it Apple prices. I can't see anyone in my extended family or most of the people I work with paying a premium for something their family computer does.



    I agree. Evidence: Microsoft's home server business is being neglected and dying.



    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/12...vail_hp_walks/



    I partially disagree. I think Apple will be more like component stereo... AppleTv will serve up Media (from the cloud), Time Capsule will back up your laptops and desktops and serve up wireless as well as hub your network to the Internet.



    But for true 'media services,' that's what the cloud will be for.



    My curiousity will be when will Apple make a Time Capsule 'caching' server (ala a google-in-a-box corp server) for the NC data Center services (nothing like having my rentals and music cached locally, backups moved to the data center in the background while doing local backups at wire speeds, and having Apple automatically proxy requests through the caching server).



    Making Time Capsule a $99 box, providing caching and backup services for my MBairs and iPads, and data shifting my rentals and 'owned' media to a local server even though stored in a cloud (the rainbarrel;-). Think of all the things Ping/Genius/Trailers/staged backups/staged mailstorage/local .Me manipulations/etc. a local box can do.



    It's a product that enhances your iPad services, keeping the need for more than 64GB down, and deflects the QoS issues of networks. For $99 and $10/month ($20 for family), I'd pay for an 'infinitely local' Me.com. Buy the box, put it on the network, let Bonjour learn it, Authenticate into it with my AppleID, configure my preferences, and boom... instant Apple Services Accelerator.



    Things can happen when you own the hardware and the software at both ends of the pipe.
  • Reply 35 of 58
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mitchell_pgh View Post


    I don't agree. I believe Internet access at the home will soon be viewed as a standard utility (on par with electricity and running water). For many businesses, it's already there. If the Internet goes down at my place of business, everything stops.



    and see my previous post. I really think the 'next big thing' in apple's set of HW offerings is TimeCapsule++ where you cache you can cache your part of the cloud locally (within your network). The magic of DRM in reverse (all _your_ stuff is only accessible to you), and can be cached whereever a TimeCapsule++ exists and 'learns' about you.



    Google sells 'Google-in-a-Blade/Box/Rack/ShippingContainer' (and soon ContainerShip). , for appliancing their Apps and locking in companies into their search services (if you offload all search to a local box with a darkfiber direct linkto the plex, you can control a lot). Apple can do the same, and offer so much more in services, since Apple can control the HW endpoint as well.
  • Reply 36 of 58
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,671member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by benice View Post


    At the apparent event, I'd also like streaming iTunes to be announced please Apple.



    Having just moved all of my music off a local mac to a network drive and found it no longer shows a single piece of album art I'm in a world of hurt as I can't even recognize my music collection. (Ideas anyone?)



    Download the 'embed artwork' iTunes script for that:

    http://dougscripts.com/itunes/script...hp?sp=embedart



    You will need to have your 'old setup' back again; music files that DO show you the artwork in iTunes. Then run the script after which you can move the music to a network drive.



    Cheers,

    PhilBoogie
  • Reply 37 of 58
    palegolaspalegolas Posts: 1,348member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Apple is rumored to hold a media event in the coming days to announce the ability to subscribe to publications on the iPad through an iTunes account.



    that subscription thing. I don't get it. Why don't they just do in-app purchases? Because they want private data on their customers? Or is it something else? Like push downloaded editions or something? I don't get it. Why don't they (the publishers) just create a solution?
  • Reply 38 of 58
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,217member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cliphord View Post


    I can't see anyone in my extended family or most of the people I work with paying a premium for something their family computer does.



    I think you nailed it right there. Only the uber geeks will want to have and will set up a dedicated machine for this function. For most folks having a family computer that also acts as their media hub is fine.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by palegolas View Post


    that subscription thing. I don't get it. Why don't they just do in-app purchases? Because they want private data on their customers?



    The data is definitely part of it. Same for under pricing print subscriptions so folks will do that and not buy piece by piece at a news stand. Being able to lure advertisers by showing long term buy in could be another
  • Reply 39 of 58
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,710member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    I think people would pay Drobo prices for an Apple Home Server that gave them the interaction Windows Home Server. I?d think the Cortex-A8 and iOS would be sufficient for this task considering Drobo used the same ARMv5 in the Time Capsule, and HP used an Atom for their Windows-based solution (which is pretty good for a Windows OS product).



    Until Apple replaces the creaky HFS+ file system with something better, Apple will never be able to duplicate the single greatest feature of Windows Home Server - block level backup with de-duplication. I installed a Windows Home Server at my church and backed up 10 workstations in less than 200GB of data due to the de-duplication capabilities that NTFS and Volume Shadow Copies enable. The equivalent storage to backup 10 mac's via Time Machine would be in the multiple terabyte range
  • Reply 40 of 58
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DocNo42 View Post


    Until Apple replaces the creaky HFS+ file system with something better, Apple will never be able to duplicate the single greatest feature of Windows Home Server - block level backup with de-duplication. I installed a Windows Home Server at my church and backed up 10 workstations in less than 200GB of data due to the de-duplication capabilities that NTFS and Volume Shadow Copies enable. The equivalent storage to backup 10 mac's via Time Machine would be in the multiple terabyte range



    While each Time Machine backup is independent or other backed machines, they do already have that technology within each TM sparse bundle. Isn’t that being used over HFS+? And what base file system could they use instead?
Sign In or Register to comment.