Piper: Android will be 'tested' once Apple brings iPhone to Verizon

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  • Reply 61 of 77
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


    1. You're wrong. (There were long lines for the Droid 1), and 2. Who cares? Only losers wait in line.



    You?ll have to supply some proof to make your point. Everything I recall had Verizon saying how much they don?t want ?flashy? lines and pics of very very tiny to no lines at very stores before opening.
  • Reply 62 of 77
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Munster said he believes Apple has made two key mistakes with the iPhone: not subsidizing the original model (an issue that was quickly addressed), and limiting the handset to AT&T in the U.S. The analyst said he believes AT&T's exclusivity has limited demand for the iPhone in the U.S.



    Is this Gene Munster?



  • Reply 63 of 77
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,803member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    I can?t see how that is an issue when the iPhone demand is still outstripping supply. Still, I think next year is the time for CDMA-based iPhone to arrive.







    Slowing is to be expecting, but peaking isn?t. Something seems very odd about a free smartphone OS found on dozens of selling models worldwide for a great range of price plateauing when the smartphone market still moving fast. Weren?t the Black Friday reports showing strong smartphone sales, maybe these activations aren?t going to show up until after Christmas. I feel some key info is missing.



    I'm not so sure. They could have waited. But remember what's happening at Verizon. Sales are slowing significantly. Those sales, smartphone sales, are mostly comprised of Android phones. You saw the last Verizon numbers. They're bad. If that's repeated across the board at other carriers, here, and possibly abroad, then I can see it.
  • Reply 64 of 77
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,803member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by xSamplex View Post


    Rational buyers will opt for an Andriod tablet due to it's open nature.



    Not only isn't that true, but "most buyers" haven't even heard of the term. They look at what's available, and whether it does what they would like, and whether they would like the company. This "open" nonsense is just a techie thing. In actuality, there is a case to be made that iOS is MORE open than Android. we have not only more apps, but a greater selection of kinds of apps. we don't have cell companies putting apps and interfaces on our phone that we can't remove. We have numerous hardware devices that Android will never have, including many that work with special programs. Often, standardization results in MORE diversity to the user in apps and accessories, because developers of both software and hardware see that they can sell, and thus develop more product.



    It's often said by reviewers that the apps for iOS are better across the board than those for Android, and they're easier to find and install very often. This is because Apple thought out the App Store better than Google thought out their Marketplace, and because iOS users are willing to pay for apps, where Android users are not.



    All of this has to be considered when wondering what "open", as well as "useful" means.
  • Reply 65 of 77
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    iTunes 9.x and iOS 4.0 have drag-n-drop capabilities. It does require that you use iTunes as an intermediary, but compared to using Mac OS X Finder of Windows Explorer I?d say this is easier to deal with as it only shows the apps with developer set file storage. I use this feature for playing AVIs on my iPhone and iPad, without first needing to do a conversion to an MP4-based codec.



    Which apps are you using to play AVI files on your devices?



    I like the free CineXPlayer on the iPad, but can't find a good equivalent for the iPhone / iPod Touch.
  • Reply 66 of 77
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dlcmh View Post


    Which apps are you using to play AVI files on your devices?



    I like the free CineXPlayer on the iPad, but can't find a good equivalent for the iPhone / iPod Touch.



    For the iPhone I use VLC Player, but for the iPad I have both VLC Player (since it’s a Universal app) and CineXPlayer (which I prefer to use on the iPad).



    VLC works well enough on my iPhone 4 and I use it infrequently enough that I see no need to buy the $2 CineXPlayer app for iPhone/Touch, but it is available.
  • Reply 67 of 77
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,803member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kevt View Post


    This is not true, at least not always. Android phones outsell the iPhone in parts of Europe e.g. UK where the iPhone is available on all carriers, albeit by a much smaller margin than in the USA.



    I've been looking for info on this for 30 minutes, and there's little that's useful, and none completely current. but here's what looks useful;



    http://www.electronista.com/articles....nokia.slides/



    http://www.reghardware.com/2010/07/27/uk_android_sales/



    Of course, as is pointed out, this is at a time when people slack off buying iPhones because of the new phone coming out, and so it skews the stats. The iPhone 4 was only available for one week at the end of the reporting period. Still, the iPhone held 64% of the market compared to Android's either 13.2 or 19%. We don't know from the article which measure was being used for the iPhone numbers, so it could either be higher or lower.
  • Reply 68 of 77
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,803member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gctwnl View Post


    Asymco (Horace Dediu) has put it succinctly: there currently is no true product/feature competition between iPhone and Android. Given the growth rate of the market, this is a supply constrained market. In a nice analogy, he writes:



    Another way to see it is this: If there is a shortage of bananas, you can?t make a case for Costa Rican bananas being preferred over Honduran bananas. People will buy whatever bananas they can get (even if one may be preferred over the other). If Honduras can produce twice as many as Costa Rica then they will sell them all and it says nothing about their quality or end user preference or whether that volume advantage will be sustainable once the shortage abates.



    In other words: As long as Honduras bananas are not completely rotten, they will be sold. If Android is halfway decent and Android outproduces Apple they will be sold more because the demand for smartphones far outstrips supply. Only when the market becomes less supply constrained will we see the true competition between Android and iOS phones.



    So, there are chances for many competitors still (Microsoft, RIM, Nokia) if they put out a decent offer. And that is not just the hard- and software of the phone. It also includes the app market, the user experience of using that app market, etc., etc.



    It seems to me that Microsoft, RIM and Nokia still have a decent chance of creating an ecosystem in this explosively growing market. They have enough clout to possibly attract enough developers to get/keep a market and thus an ecosystem started/going. The situation for HP seems dark to me. What chance do they have to actually build an ecosystem?



    Android's ecosystem total dominance is still far from certain too. For larger apps you need a memory architecture comparable to the iPhone. That is why the just announced Nexus S has such an architecture (enough flash RAM, no SD card). But it is the only one where such apps will run. That is a pretty small market.



    Interesting times indeed.



    I can agree with that. but that doesn't mean that MS and others have all the time they need to do this. Right now, iOS and Android are getting all the publicity, and the mindshare. Most people would respond with iPhone and Android when asked what they're considering.



    WP7, Nokia, RIM, and even WebOS still have chances to make good. but Nokia is quickly losing marketshare. They've even been supplanted in Finland by the iPhone in marketshare. RIM is still doing well, but that 44% that said they would do it again is dreadful. Can they change that number? It won't be easy, as it's been declining over some time. WebOs has had its chance. Can Hp turn it around? They don't seem to be too eager. They seem to be more interested in embedded uses for the OS along with tablets. Whether they'll succeed in tablets is to me, a long shot.



    And then there's WP7. It's new, sorta. But it doesn't seem to be engendering too much enthusiasm. Sales don't seem to be great so far, so who knows? Will it continue as an also ran, or can it become one of the big three? They need a lot more apps, and they need them soon.
  • Reply 69 of 77
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,803member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


    1. You're wrong. (There were long lines for the Droid 1), and 2. Who cares? Only losers wait in line.



    Only losers make comments about other people's interests and intentions in that way. I waited on line during a nice bright sunny day the first day the 3G iPad came out, and had a good time talking to people from around the world who were doing the same thing. I don't think any of us are losers, do you, really?
  • Reply 70 of 77
    samabsamab Posts: 1,953member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by melgross View Post


    I'm not so sure. They could have waited. But remember what's happening at Verizon. Sales are slowing significantly. Those sales, smartphone sales, are mostly comprised of Android phones. You saw the last Verizon numbers. They're bad. If that's repeated across the board at other carriers, here, and possibly abroad, then I can see it.



    How was it bad? Since the iphone 4 was launched at the end of Q2, AT&T had 1000 more postpaid net adds than Verizon in Q2+Q3.
  • Reply 71 of 77
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,803member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by samab View Post


    How was it bad? Since the iphone 4 was launched at the end of Q2, AT&T had 1000 more postpaid net adds than Verizon in Q2+Q3.



    Just look at the numbers. AT&T is adding subscribers way faster than Verizon, Shortly, they will surpass them. Most of those adds are iPhone adds, and those are stable, high paying customers. That's what matters. And Verizon knows it.
  • Reply 72 of 77
    samabsamab Posts: 1,953member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by melgross View Post


    Just look at the numbers. AT&T is adding subscribers way faster than Verizon, Shortly, they will surpass them. Most of those adds are iPhone adds, and those are stable, high paying customers. That's what matters. And Verizon knows it.



    AT&T's ARPU went down, profit margins went down --- they are buying market shares.



    Verizon has 1.249 million postpaid net adds since the iphone 4 was launched in June 2010. AT&T has 1.250 million postpaid net adds since the iphone 4 was launched in June 2010. That's the difference --- a 1000 postpaid net adds.



    The vast majority of AT&T's net adds come from MVNO's and connected devices.
  • Reply 73 of 77
    tjwtjw Posts: 216member
    Unless the US market is somehow unique and completely different to Europe then I find this story hard to believe.



    The iPhone is on every carrier in all countries in Europe and android is now overtaking iOS on phones. Having a choice of carriers in the UK has not made iPhone dominate android at all.



    Then again, mobile operators don't seem quite as retarded in the UK from what I have heard about the US.
  • Reply 74 of 77
    msfmsf Posts: 20member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by davesw View Post


    In the US and other countries Android phones are widely known as CRAPPY, 2nd-rate copy cat version of the iPhone.



    source on this?



    I have used iPhone, iPhone 3G, & iPhone 3Gs. Now I am using the Droid X. I always thought I would jump on the iPhone as soon as it hits Verizon. Not so sure I will be doing that. The onlly thing I miss from the iPhone is gapless playback. It is real nice not being tied to iTunes.
  • Reply 75 of 77
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,985member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    You?ll have to supply some proof to make your point. Everything I recall had Verizon saying how much they don?t want ?flashy? lines and pics of very very tiny to no lines at very stores before opening.



    Here's proof.



    http://news.cnet.com/8301-30686_3-10392128-266.html



    But no, there normally aren't lines for Android devices or any other for that matter except gaming consoles.
  • Reply 76 of 77
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,803member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by samab View Post


    AT&T's ARPU went down, profit margins went down --- they are buying market shares.



    Verizon has 1.249 million postpaid net adds since the iphone 4 was launched in June 2010. AT&T has 1.250 million postpaid net adds since the iphone 4 was launched in June 2010. That's the difference --- a 1000 postpaid net adds.



    The vast majority of AT&T's net adds come from MVNO's and connected devices.



    Like it or not, this is what really matters.



    http://www.businessweek.com/news/201...ne-demand.html



    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/23/te...23verizon.html
  • Reply 77 of 77
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,803member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tjw View Post


    Unless the US market is somehow unique and completely different to Europe then I find this story hard to believe.



    The iPhone is on every carrier in all countries in Europe and android is now overtaking iOS on phones. Having a choice of carriers in the UK has not made iPhone dominate android at all.



    Then again, mobile operators don't seem quite as retarded in the UK from what I have heard about the US.



    Yeah, they're pretty bad in the UK. Every time I've been there I read about that.



    Read the links I posted about Apple vs Android in Europe.
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