Microsoft objects to Apple's "App Store" trademark application

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  • Reply 61 of 153
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Narcogen View Post


    No, it is a specific term that refers to a specific public network. That's why you capitalize it when you talk about the Internet.



    Sorry, but there is no one specific public network called "Internet". Rather it is a collection of networks owned by various companies, public utilities, etc that are publically accessible.
  • Reply 62 of 153
    Putting aside the legal details, this is just weak nonsense from MS. Why do they care, other than wanting to steal one more idea from someone else? Ask yourself what Google did - they set up their own app store and called it Google Marketplace. So they established their own brand that people know and recognize - they didn't run around suing people. Why not spend a few more dollars getting copy and paste in WM7 instead of of this? I think the poster who pointed out that MS has TMed "word" summed up why this is so ridiculous coming from MS.



    I guess WM7 sales are worse than we think...
  • Reply 63 of 153
    Oh Microshaft, why art thy shaft so small? 8D



    I do think that Apple deserves the trademark "App Store". The name "App store" is clever, and original. There were online distributions of software before the App store, and nobody called them app stores, why not? I'm certain 'app' has been around a while, and of course 'store' has also been around a while. But nobody was using those words together until Apple made the App store popular. Also, i think that App as used in this connotation isn't a direct reference to "Application". Iphone apps aren't thought of as iphone applications (and they never were), they are always thought of just as 'apps'. In this sense, I think App isn't just an abreviation, but an entirely new word to describe a small application.



    I think this attempt by Microsoft really just shows how much of a complex MS has developed towards Apple. Why such an inferiority complex?
  • Reply 64 of 153
    bdkennedy1bdkennedy1 Posts: 1,459member
    App is not a dictionary defined term so it will stand as a trademark.
  • Reply 65 of 153
    When I hear 'App Store,' I think of Apple. If Microsoft ever creates an original new product, I will support their rights for their unique name as well.
  • Reply 66 of 153
    technotechno Posts: 735member
    Holy Crap! I am so ashamed that I read most of this terrible thread.
  • Reply 67 of 153
    pathetic as usual...what else do you expect from ballmer?



    by the way, i'd love to know how microsoft stores are doing
  • Reply 68 of 153
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,492member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Bretzelburg View Post


    Windows







    Actually it's not too funny when you actually want to search on line for 'real' windows!
  • Reply 69 of 153
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,492member
    Perhaps Microsoft need the money and are hoping for a settlement
  • Reply 70 of 153
    gary54gary54 Posts: 169member
    the Windows world used the term "Program" for actionable computer software.





    Extension: .app



    "Application program (or executable file) that runs under Mac OS X; runs when double-clicked; similar to a .EXE file in Windows.



    Because APP files are Mac OS packages, you can right-click (or control-click) an application and select "Show Package Contents" to view the files contained in the package. These include Resources used by the application, property list (.PLIST) files, frameworks, plugins, icons, and other files.



    In Windows and Linux systems, it may be possible to view the contents of a Mac OS X application as if it were a folder. A decompression program like WinRAR may also be able to extract files from a Mac OS X application on other operating systems."
  • Reply 71 of 153
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jacobo007 View Post


    The term App Store is already related immediately to Apple by the consumer, Microsoft should focus in making great products and stop fighting over this.



    Agree with you. If Apple calls it "App Store", Microsoft could call their store "Micro Store", "Ball Store", "Soft Store", "Win Store", "Lost Store", "Kin Store", "Con Store", Etc, and Etc. They DO have a lot of choices !!



    Some one else suggested "Ape Store" ! May be that is well done !!
  • Reply 72 of 153
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by scottkrk View Post


    BTW In the past Microsoft has always used the term "Programs" and Apple has always used the term "Applications". Will a new feature of Windows 8 be the "App Menu"!



    Exchange 2010 OWA (Outlook Web App).



    Windows Phone 7 Apps.



    Bing Maps App SDK.



    Windows Web App Gallery.



    Probably the big one is Office Web Apps. Word Web App, Excel Web App, Powerpoint Web App, OneNote Web App.



    It looks like Microsoft wants to call a "program" that lives on the web an "application" or "app", probably to distinguish them from normal x86 "programs" running on a PC.



    I'm not sure how this trademark would work if Apple won it. Would any other company be allowed to call and application an "app"?



    Maybe Microsoft want to continue to use the word "app" and they may not be able to if Apple wins the trademark. Maybe "App Store" has nothing to do with it???
  • Reply 73 of 153
    davidwdavidw Posts: 1,607member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DarkVader View Post


    Much like patents, trademark registrations have gotten out of hand.



    It should not be possible to trademark an already used word, ever. You want a trademark, you should have to make up a new word.



    Apple may be the cause of the word application being shortened to app, but they're not the ones who came up with the word, and even if they were, it was in common use for years before they decided they wanted a trademark.



    It's generic, M$ is right this time. Not that they usually are on this issue - they should be forced to give up trademarks on windows and word.



    Oh, and trademark loss on genericization should be automatic. Words like xerox, kleenex, and google are now part of the language, and should no longer be trademarkable, much like aspirin is now fully public domain, rather than a trademark of Bayer. As far as that goes, apple shouldn't be trademarkable by itself, they should have kept the company name Apple Computer.



    Apple is not trying to "copyright" the term "app". It's the term "The App Store" or The AppStore" that they are trying to "trademark" as a name for a place of business. The term "app" being generic has nothing to do with it. If I want to open a hamburger diner and name it "The Burger Place", I can get a trademark on that name. Providing there's no other diner with that name or the name can be confused with any already established diners. It doesn't matter how generic the terms "burger" and "place" are. And it doesn't matter how much McDonalds or Burger King might protest. It's a trademark on a name for a business. Not a trademark for a product like "Kleenix", Clorox" or Scotch Tape". And not a copyright of a word. Ever hear of "Furniture Barn", Tower Records", "Record Factory", "Ace Hardware" or "Radio Shack"? All trademarked names for businesses and all names consisting of generic words.
  • Reply 74 of 153
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gary54 View Post


    the Windows world used the term "Program" for actionable computer software.





    Extension: .app



    "Application program (or executable file) that runs under Mac OS X; runs when double-clicked; similar to a .EXE file in Windows.



    Because APP files are Mac OS packages, you can right-click (or control-click) an application and select "Show Package Contents" to view the files contained in the package. These include Resources used by the application, property list (.PLIST) files, frameworks, plugins, icons, and other files.



    In Windows and Linux systems, it may be possible to view the contents of a Mac OS X application as if it were a folder. A decompression program like WinRAR may also be able to extract files from a Mac OS X application on other operating systems."




    I think you win the prize. I totally forgot about this aspect.



    Trademarking generic unoriginal words already long in use by the public is indeed dumb and shouldn't be allowed, (see "Droid" and a million other examples), but I completely forgot that Apple actually originated the term in the first place.
  • Reply 75 of 153
    I always thought it was called the App Store because Apple has been using the .app extension for applications for many years, and also because it's the first three letters in Apple. Microsoft has the same right to Exe Store .



    I would agree that "app store" has entered common vocabulary in much the same way as kleenex or xerox, but that doesn't mean that Kleenex and Xerox aren't legally enforceable trademarks.
  • Reply 76 of 153
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post


    Exchange 2010 OWA (Outlook Web App).



    Windows Phone 7 Apps.



    Bing Maps App SDK.



    Windows Web App Gallery.



    Probably the big one is Office Web Apps. Word Web App, Excel Web App, Powerpoint Web App, OneNote Web App.



    It looks like Microsoft wants to call a "program" that lives on the web an "application" or "app", probably to distinguish them from normal x86 "programs" running on a PC.



    I'm not sure how this trademark would work if Apple won it. Would any other company be allowed to call and application an "app"?



    Maybe Microsoft want to continue to use the word "app" and they may not be able to if Apple wins the trademark. Maybe "App Store" has nothing to do with it???



    Thank you! Finally something to contrast against the tortured Apple is always right drivel in this thread.
  • Reply 77 of 153
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,492member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nkhm View Post


    Or Microsoft could maybe INNOVATE with their own name?



    Why do they need "app store" - everyone associates that with Apple. Why not "Application Central" or "App Centre" or "Market Place" - oh, hang on...



    Always the need to copy and steal Apple's innovation in all areas, why not just get off their lazy behinds and coin their own phrase to eclipse Apple's own?



    You have to be kinder It must be hard for them to change after 30 something years of using Apple as their R&D department.
  • Reply 78 of 153
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,492member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gary54 View Post


    the Windows world used the term "Program" for actionable computer software.





    Extension: .app



    "Application program (or executable file) that runs under Mac OS X; runs when double-clicked; similar to a .EXE file in Windows.



    Because APP files are Mac OS packages, you can right-click (or control-click) an application and select "Show Package Contents" to view the files contained in the package. These include Resources used by the application, property list (.PLIST) files, frameworks, plugins, icons, and other files.



    In Windows and Linux systems, it may be possible to view the contents of a Mac OS X application as if it were a folder. A decompression program like WinRAR may also be able to extract files from a Mac OS X application on other operating systems."




    I agree with your point. Plus the Microsoft "Prog Store" seems to have a nice catchy ring to it too What are they waiting for?
  • Reply 79 of 153
    iliveriliver Posts: 299member
    "Censored app store" would be more appropriate.
  • Reply 80 of 153
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,492member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by StLBluesFan View Post


    Thank you! Finally something to contrast against the tortured Apple is always right drivel in this thread.



    All those examples are simply Windows 7 copying everything Apple! Hardly historic data.
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