Proximity sensor on Apple's iPad 2 could bring auto screen lock, unlock

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 40
    ivladivlad Posts: 740member
    I think it's pretty obvious the the future of user interface and any experience is button-less. It's just a matter of when. I hope apple patents all these new ways of interactions.
  • Reply 22 of 40
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post


    This still seems a bit ridiculous to me. Do people seriously have trouble finding one of the two buttons on the thing that turn the screen on and off? and if you still have to swipe it, then I don't see how this actually confers any kind of advantage on the user.



    Also, one possible fly in the ointment is that they have to have a sensor either around the edge or in the bezel to control this, so someone putting their finger in the wrong place is going to turn off the screen all the time.



    I presume they have a preference to turn this on and off, but then *that's* a bit wacky too since Apple usually goes out of their way not to give users preferences like that. The whole thing sounds really un-Apple-like to me.



    That?s a strawman argument. "Do we really need to have keyboard shortcuts when there are menu items that do the same thing. Is it really that much of an inconvenience to use the mouse to select cut/copy/paste from the Edit menu?? There are an infinite number of examples where technology just gets slightly more convenient even though the method that preceded it wasn?t deemed inconvenient of unwieldy.



    The new swipe features for iOS beta have made this device much more usable for me. I actually enjoy lounging with it now. Being able to open and close my iPad case and go back to a book or webpage or whatever without hitting a button will just increase that enjoyment a little more.
  • Reply 23 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post


    On the face of it, this sounds completely ridiculous.



    Doing this would completely circumvent the "security" of the swipe to open feature. The swipe to open "feature" is something that people have been asking for the ability to remove since the first day of the first iPhone. Apple has steadfastly resisted all efforts and protestations to do so on the basis of "security." This is also the number one thing standing in the way of having an integrated home screen which has also been asked for since day one.



    I just don't see Apple screwing people over about this for four solid years and then just casually introducing a feature that completely goes around it.



    Actually buddy, the swipe to open feature wasn't on the original iPhone. When pressing the unlock button it would return to the homescreen immediately. Later in some new iOS version (2.0, 3.0?) they introduced the "slide to unlock" screen. Although... i know i've seen the "slide to unlock" screen on iOS 1. I had an iPod touch, maybe only the iPod didn't use the slide?
  • Reply 24 of 40
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by a.punk View Post


    Actually buddy, the swipe to open feature wasn't on the original iPhone. When pressing the unlock button it would return to the homescreen immediately. Later in some new iOS version (2.0, 3.0?) they introduced the "slide to unlock" screen. Although... i know i've seen the "slide to unlock" screen on iOS 1. I had an iPod touch, maybe only the iPod didn't use the slide?



    ¿Que? Your 1st and 3rd sentence contradict themselves. They used ?slide to unlock? and ?slide to power off? since v1.0.
  • Reply 25 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post


    This still seems a bit ridiculous to me. Do people seriously have trouble finding one of the two buttons on the thing that turn the screen on and off? and if you still have to swipe it, then I don't see how this actually confers any kind of advantage on the user.



    It's no different from when you open your MacBook Pro and it turns right on.

    Close the lid and it turns right off.

    Very convenient.

    Better power management.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post


    Also, one possible fly in the ointment is that they have to have a sensor either around the edge or in the bezel to control this, so someone putting their finger in the wrong place is going to turn off the screen all the time.



    The same type of proximity sensors have existed in the iPhone since 2007.

    Ever turn the screen off accidentally?



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post


    I presume they have a preference to turn this on and off, but then *that's* a bit wacky too since Apple usually goes out of their way not to give users preferences like that. The whole thing sounds really un-Apple-like to me.



    Of course it sounds very "un-Apple-like" because you clearly don't understand the concept.

    Simplicity, convenience and better power management.
  • Reply 26 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by a.punk View Post


    Actually buddy, the swipe to open feature wasn't on the original iPhone. When pressing the unlock button it would return to the homescreen immediately. Later in some new iOS version (2.0, 3.0?) they introduced the "slide to unlock" screen. Although... i know i've seen the "slide to unlock" screen on iOS 1. I had an iPod touch, maybe only the iPod didn't use the slide?



    Slide to unlock was the first feature Steve Jobs showed on iPhone 1.0 and the audience was floored.

    Its been there since day zero.
  • Reply 27 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by a.punk View Post


    Actually buddy, the swipe to open feature wasn't on the original iPhone. When pressing the unlock button it would return to the homescreen immediately. Later in some new iOS version (2.0, 3.0?) they introduced the "slide to unlock" screen. Although... i know i've seen the "slide to unlock" screen on iOS 1. I had an iPod touch, maybe only the iPod didn't use the slide?



    "Slide to Unlock" has been in place since 2007, i.e. v1.0 on both the iPhone and the iPod Touch.
  • Reply 28 of 40
    I would have thought this feature would be implemented similar to how a blackberry device works when you put the device in it's holster - I believe this is achieved via some form of magnet in the holster itself, not via proximity sensors on the blackberry. My blackberry screen turns off and locks automatically as I am inserting it in the holster, and the screen turns on when I remove it from the holster.



    Of course, this means that only apple-designed/approved cases would be able to achieve this initially.
  • Reply 29 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Johnny Mozzarella View Post


    The same type of proximity sensors have existed in the iPhone since 2007. Ever turn the screen off?



    AFAIK the sensor is only active in the iPhone when a phone call is started. The functionality in the iPad would be totally different (it would be active all the time).



    Since I occationally hit the home button without meaning to, you can be sure as heck that I'm going to turn the screen off as well!
  • Reply 30 of 40
    onhkaonhka Posts: 1,025member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    And this welcome addition is only effective if you have a ‘lid' on your iPad case. I doubt that pocketable iDevices will get this feature.



    Would it be possible to just wave your hand over them to basically 'wake' them up?



    As to why? remove the button at all.



    Answer: One less mechanical item that has to be fixed.
  • Reply 31 of 40
    clexmanclexman Posts: 150member
    They have had this feature in blackberrys as long as i can remember. A small magnet embedded in the case triggers the lock. You can customize it a ton of ways, like changing the ringer volume automatically when in its case.



    There is nothing to see here. Its a nice addition, but nothing to write a story about.
  • Reply 32 of 40
    dishdish Posts: 64member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post


    On the face of it, this sounds completely ridiculous.



    Doing this would completely circumvent the "security" of the swipe to open feature. The swipe to open "feature" is something that people have been asking for the ability to remove since the first day of the first iPhone. Apple has steadfastly resisted all efforts and protestations to do so on the basis of "security." This is also the number one thing standing in the way of having an integrated home screen which has also been asked for since day one.



    I just don't see Apple screwing people over about this for four solid years and then just casually introducing a feature that completely goes around it.



    The iPad is not the iPhone. Ever since getting the iPad I found the swipe to open unnecessary. Swipe to open (when not coupled with an unlock code) is not a security feature, it is a feature that prevents you from accidentally activating apps if you the power or home button gets inadvertently pressed. That never happens to my iPad because it's always in the Apple case so its really just a pain. I now run a jailbreak tool that disables the swipe to unlock, so as soon as I hit the home or power button the iPad goes to the home screen or the app that was left open. Pressing the power and then having to swipe to open slows things down just enough to make it a nuisance. As for the iPhone, I have pocket dialed enough that I would never removed it.
  • Reply 33 of 40
    dishdish Posts: 64member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post


    This still seems a bit ridiculous to me. Do people seriously have trouble finding one of the two buttons on the thing that turn the screen on and off? and if you still have to swipe it, then I don't see how this actually confers any kind of advantage on the user.



    Also, one possible fly in the ointment is that they have to have a sensor either around the edge or in the bezel to control this, so someone putting their finger in the wrong place is going to turn off the screen all the time.



    I presume they have a preference to turn this on and off, but then *that's* a bit wacky too since Apple usually goes out of their way not to give users preferences like that. The whole thing sounds really un-Apple-like to me.



    good point...perhaps there will be 2 or 3 sensors on different sides so unless you are a Hindu god with 6 hands, you won't trigger it accidentally.
  • Reply 34 of 40
    dishdish Posts: 64member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cmf2 View Post


    That can already be accomplished with the power button instead of the the home button. Stop trying to remove the home button. It's not happening and there is no reason to do so.



    Actually there is a very good reason to remove the home button. Apple recently was granted a patent for a virtual/interactive boarder. So for example instead of the black boarder that goes around the current iPad you would have a boarder that appears and disappears as needed i.e for your thumbs. The home button gets in the way of that....also if they remove the home button they will be able to increase the screen even more without changing the dimensions of the panel. They seem to be interested in increasing the size in this way...if rumors of the iPad 2 panel are to be believed (the boarder is said to be slightly thinner on the iPad 2). So based on the patent as well as for the ability to increase viewable display I say there is a very good reason to remove the home button. Some have pointed out that the home button is needed when doing a reboot but I would think that it wouldn't be very hard for Apple to configure the iPad so that you could for example hold power + volume instead of power + home....or something like that. Whats more, personally I don't use home very much I think its functionality as far as exiting apps or activating the app drawer is better served by a touch gesture when you consider what you stand to gain from getting rid of it.
  • Reply 35 of 40
    dishdish Posts: 64member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by clexman View Post


    They have had this feature in blackberrys as long as i can remember. A small magnet embedded in the case triggers the lock. You can customize it a ton of ways, like changing the ringer volume automatically when in its case.



    There is nothing to see here. Its a nice addition, but nothing to write a story about.



    But doesn't comparing a magnet lock to a proximity sensor lock seem like comparing a steam engine to an electric motor? Proximity sensors like flywheels are sexy. If apple was making these devices in the 80s I could imagine them with a magnetic lock.
  • Reply 36 of 40
    dishdish Posts: 64member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Onhka View Post


    Would it be possible to just wave your hand over them to basically 'wake' them up?



    As to why? remove the button at all.



    Answer: One less mechanical item that has to be fixed.



    thats a good point, the buttons parts do add complication to the manufacturing process, take up valuable space and is just another thing to break or from which moisture can be introduced to the pcb. Also there is a patten that suggest apple plans to virtualize the black boarder.
  • Reply 37 of 40
    nobodyynobodyy Posts: 377member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dish View Post


    The iPad is not the iPhone. Ever since getting the iPad I found the swipe to open unnecessary. Swipe to open (when not coupled with an unlock code) is not a security feature, it is a feature that prevents you from accidentally activating apps if you the power or home button gets inadvertently pressed. That never happens to my iPad because it's always in the Apple case so its really just a pain. I now run a jailbreak tool that disables the swipe to unlock, so as soon as I hit the home or power button the iPad goes to the home screen or the app that was left open. Pressing the power and then having to swipe to open slows things down just enough to make it a nuisance. As for the iPhone, I have pocket dialed enough that I would never removed it.



    A little bit over obsessive about nothing.

    I like the Slide-to-Unlock mechanism because the casing for my iPad only covers the back and sides, leaving the face to the open, so you can speak for yourself when you say it's useless. And honestly, it takes less than 2 seconds to push the Home or Lock button and slide your finger twice inches, hardly a nuisance.

    Besides, you seem to have everything taken care of with the jailbreak, nbd.
  • Reply 38 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dish View Post


    But doesn't comparing a magnet lock to a proximity sensor lock seem like comparing a steam engine to an electric motor? Proximity sensors like flywheels are sexy. If apple was making these devices in the 80s I could imagine them with a magnetic lock.



    No.



    The magnetometer in the iPad requires much less power than the proximity sensor and can't be accidentally triggered no matter how you hold it. All iPad models have a magnetometer.



    The proximity sensor has an infrared beam and a small camera which would need to be powered all the time while it were not in use. Not going to happen.
  • Reply 39 of 40
    nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member
    This would also be great if you secretly nuzzle your iPad with your face like an affection-starved alley cat. People do that a lot, and it can trigger unwanted touch signals.
  • Reply 40 of 40
    clexmanclexman Posts: 150member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dish View Post


    But doesn't comparing a magnet lock to a proximity sensor lock seem like comparing a steam engine to an electric motor? Proximity sensors like flywheels are sexy. If apple was making these devices in the 80s I could imagine them with a magnetic lock.



    Technically, the magnet trick is a type of proximity sensor. Maybe Apple will call it an iMagnet. Everyone will want an iMagnet embedded case.



    Don't forget that they already used magnets in their MacBooks to lower the hooks when the lid is closed...
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