The Mac Pro is Dead

11011131516

Comments

  • Reply 241 of 308
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Fus View Post


    is good news?



    No chips...



    ...means they can't exist. You have to wait until Q3 2011 at the earliest.
  • Reply 242 of 308
    allanmcallanmc Posts: 53member
    The Z68 chips for iMacs didn't exist either until they were found in the latest edition of the indomitable iMac...

    but are they perhaps all thats needed? is twin Zeon outdated? could StrongArm A15 multinode processing as was Archimedes be the "RiscOS" future or will 3D Ivy be enough to bridge the gap next year? Intel are betting each way on production but does Apple know they are to change platforms yet again?



    No one's mentioned the natural link so far but Apple have broken the use of nVidea GPUs recently affiliated with Intel and adopted what was ATI GPU's in the iMacs now owned by AMD surely it would follow to also use future AMD CPU's to avoid compatibility issues as AMD will also eventually adopt such 3D technology halving current/thermal problems in both CPU and GPU and combined single chip solutions.



    At the end of the day Apple are a software driven company providing suitable hardware designs to run their OS'es and applications on, and will only provide a macpro if there is a suitable market to benefit from, the question is will Apple be bothered?

    the answer may be if the Macpro only gets a facelift then perhaps no, if it gets a redesign then definitely yes.
  • Reply 243 of 308
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AllanMc View Post


    The Z68 chips for iMacs didn't exist either until they were found in the latest edition of the indomitable iMac...



    The difference here is that the Z96 board is being released the 11th of May.



    Sandy Bridge Xeons for the Mac Pro are six months away.
  • Reply 244 of 308
    compos24compos24 Posts: 21member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    The difference here is that the Z96 board is being released the 11th of May.



    Sandy Bridge Xeons for the Mac Pro are six months away.



    So...you think/know that an updated Mac Pro is six months (+/-) away?
  • Reply 245 of 308
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by compos24 View Post


    So...you think/know that an updated Mac Pro is six months (+/-) away?



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandy_Bridge



    LGA 1356. Q4 2011. Yeah, I'd say so.
  • Reply 246 of 308
    marvfoxmarvfox Posts: 2,275member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by compos24 View Post


    So...you think/know that an updated Mac Pro is six months (+/-) away?



    Who really cares!
  • Reply 247 of 308
    compos24compos24 Posts: 21member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by marvfox View Post


    Who really cares!



    I care. I'm going to buy a Mac Pro, as an upgrade from my late 2009 iMac. Since I'm spending this type of money, I'd like to have the latest model.



    While I do need the upgrade, I have time to be patient, as well. Any one have a reason to just buy now?
  • Reply 248 of 308
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by compos24 View Post


    I care. I'm going to buy a Mac Pro, as an upgrade from my late 2009 iMac. Since I'm spending this type of money, I'd like to have the latest model.



    While I do need the upgrade, I have time to be patient, as well. Any one have a reason to just buy now?



    I'd suggest doing what I did... get the 6 core Westmere machine @ 3.3GHz. The only reason I see to go to the machines with dual CPUs (12 physical cores) is if that box is going to spend more than a few hours a day doing some kind of video processing... otherwise the better clock speed will generally make more difference.



    As for beyond that, I'd pass on a Sandy Bridge based one, but Ivy Bridge DOES look very interesting. Of course, there is NO guarentee we'll be seeing any of these... it's all up to Cupertino. While we users may debate the point, there is an awful lot of, dare I say it, sound business reasons for them to stick to iMacs on the desktop and the whole mobile thing... keep in mind this is the company whose latest iMacs HAVE to be HDD upgraded by buying their 3 times price over market hard drives!
  • Reply 249 of 308
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ClassicGuy View Post


    ...latest iMacs HAVE to be HDD upgraded by buying their 3 times price over market hard drives!



    Quit spreading this FUD. It gets enough press without forum users believing it.
  • Reply 250 of 308
    brucepbrucep Posts: 2,823member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by marvfox View Post


    Who really cares!



    Not nice

    Please say your sorry





    We must always try to treat each other with kindness and respect .



    Thank you



    brucep
  • Reply 251 of 308
    brucepbrucep Posts: 2,823member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by compos24 View Post


    I care. I'm going to buy a Mac Pro, as an upgrade from my late 2009 iMac. Since I'm spending this type of money, I'd like to have the latest model.



    While I do need the upgrade, I have time to be patient, as well. Any one have a reason to just buy now?



    I would wait until they put out a new full upgrade .

    Late 09 seems like very new ???

    Why change so fast ?

    What happens to your old machine ??

    Have you considered the high end IMACS ??





    peace



    9
  • Reply 252 of 308
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,951member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    Quit spreading this FUD. It gets enough press without forum users believing it.



    What's the truth then? I haven't seen any article in my feeds that correct this supposed misinformation.
  • Reply 253 of 308
    zephzeph Posts: 133member
    There's a few threads on Macrumors were users report successfully replacing 2011 iMacs' HDD's.



    ChargedPC has a how-to.



    looks like OWC dropped the ball on this one.
  • Reply 254 of 308
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,786moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by zeph View Post


    There's a few threads on Macrumors were users report successfully replacing 2011 iMacs' HDD's.



    ChargedPC has a how-to.



    looks like OWC dropped the ball on this one.



    I don't know, HardMac is suggesting short-circuiting the pins on the connector:



    http://www.hardmac.com/news/2011/05/...-the-2011-imac



    That doesn't sound like a good solution. Using a splitter cable suggested on this forum seems ok but not entirely straightforward and means ordering the right part.
  • Reply 255 of 308
    zephzeph Posts: 133member
    Well, if I wanted to tinker with the hardware I would not buy an iMac in the first place, but the Hardmac article also says that it is not that different from replacing the HDD in a 2010 iMac.



    I reckon if you're inclined to open a brand-new iMac and muck about with parts, shorting a few pins isn't gonna faze you.
  • Reply 256 of 308
    compos24compos24 Posts: 21member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by brucep View Post


    I would wait until they put out a new full upgrade .

    Late 09 seems like very new ???

    Why change so fast ?

    What happens to your old machine ??

    Have you considered the high end IMACS ??





    peace



    9



    I'm a music composition student (college). My sample library, and studio set-up, is growing rapidly. In fact, I have more than my current CPU can handle efficiently, if at all. Beyond the obvious processing speed increases, I really need that option of easy upgradability.



    I need to upgrade to a rig that allows me to create with the most efficiency possible. It's a cliche, but it's true. I understand what people are saying when they say that they'd prefer an iMac (I've owned two, so far)... but, a Mac Pro is what I need for my career/passion, even in it's infant stage.
  • Reply 257 of 308
    sybariticsybaritic Posts: 340member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by compos24 View Post


    I understand what people are saying when they say that they'd prefer an iMac (I've owned two, so far)... but, a Mac Pro is what I need for my career/passion, even in its infant stage.



    I understand completely. If I were you, I'd wait until the coming upgrade, whenever that may be—and then I'd buy a Mac Pro. The strengths of the update—Thunderbolt and SATA III (with the option of 6Gb/s SSDs)—are very much worth the wait. To the extent that any current technology is "future-proof," that is the way to go.
  • Reply 258 of 308
    brucepbrucep Posts: 2,823member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by compos24 View Post


    I'm a music composition student (college). My sample library, and studio set-up, is growing rapidly. In fact, I have more than my current CPU can handle efficiently, if at all. Beyond the obvious processing speed increases, I really need that option of easy upgradability.



    I need to upgrade to a rig that allows me to create with the most efficiency possible. It's a cliche, but it's true. I understand what people are saying when they say that they'd prefer an iMac (I've owned two, so far)... but, a Mac Pro is what I need for my career/passion, even in it's infant stage.



    WOW

    So I would suggest you go to an apple store and see for real if a mac pro is what you need

    Also many Companies and or schools may have just last yr bought fully stock top end MAC PRO SYSTEMS



    If apple bring's an up grade this yr To MAC PRO many companies may dump great systems cheap on the market just to grab the latest tech from apple .



    So you also could try that road . Getting a high end system slightly used by geek types for a great price .



    anyway good luck !!!





    bruce



    9
  • Reply 259 of 308
    svnippsvnipp Posts: 430member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Michael Wilkie View Post


    Those who do upgrades on their home computer outside of RAM represent a minority class of hobbyists who like to tinker. And if you're the tinkering type then the Mac platform is probably not for you. Build a PC and install Ubuntu.



    I fall into this particular class myself. Having bought a Mac Pro a little over 3 years ago I'm very happy with the machine, but it is getting long in the tooth and I'm now wondering about going back to building a custom machine myself. Of course there is the problem of not having OSX on a custom built machine. I'm sure I could go the Hackintosh route, but though I like to tinker I really don't have time to deal with what I'm afraid would rapidly become a headache trying to keep with with things on a Hackintosh.



    Right now my biggest growing pain with my current Mac Pro is the GeForce 8800 GT. Though this was a great video card back in it's day, that day was about 4 years ago. I'm now debating whether to wait and see what graphics options are available with the next Mac Pro refresh or just dropping the money on the ATI 5770.
  • Reply 260 of 308
    svnippsvnipp Posts: 430member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


    See right here I have to start to disagree. Large businesses are very reluctant to upgrade a PC. Believe me I've had arguements about this. This may be different in a small business or professional firm where the user has more control, but in a corporate environment where you have zero control over IT upgrades don't happen.



    Again I disagree completely. Even in the Apple world disk drive expansion happens but often through external drives. Can you honestly deny the extensive use of external disks in the Mac world? Further RAM expansion was extremely common for years mostly due to Apples high cost of RAM.



    I'd really like to know what your definition of average is because honestly what you describe is well below the norm.



    As to Apple I'm actually surprised that they have been successful so long with reliance on external drives for expansion in most of their machines. It is realky a stupid way to solve the average users space problems.



    Sorry to hear that. Maybe they keep such activity quite so as to avoid rants from other family members. Or maybe they don't know better and simply buy new hardware when they run out of disk space (seen lots of that). Or maybe they are below average users that don't leverage their machines the way many do. In any event you have a hard time convincing me that the family is average.



    If you are not sure then you really don't know at all. Face there are multiple companies that exist simply to supply the Mac upgrade market. On top of that other companies service the market as part of their over all business. If the volume of upgrades was as low as you suggest then these offerings would be very expensive, they aren't thus the implication of reasonable volumes.



    A scratched record can repeat the same thing over and over for ever too. That doesnt make it useful. What I don't like about your statement is the implication that the average Joe is so stupid he can't plug in a disk drive, internal or external. If that is your view of people than I feel sorry for you. The average Joe is reasonably capable.



    OK let me make this clear: you are simply wrong to be using such a broad statement. In fact you really don't know what you are talking about.





    Whatever. You see what you want to see. Honestly you must have seen at keast one or two external drives, as to internal upgrades how would you even know without either looking or asking.? Same thing goes for RAM.



    Mind you I'm not saying everybody upgrades their machine before replacement, what I'm totally rejecting is this "not common in the slightest" point which is pure BS. That is an extreme statement to make.



    I'm not going to pick apart individual aspects of this response, but I'm going to generally disagree here. Having built a couple dozen PCs for family, friends, and myself over the years I'm quite familiar with that particular route. Being a tinkerer, and very much an above average user I have upgraded my own PCs regularly. However, I very rarely upgraded any of the other PCs that I built for people.



    One example of this is my brother-in-law who I build an AutoCAD PC for several years ago. We went to Fry's and I selected all of the components and built the thing from the ground up. He had problems with a failed motherboard a year or so later, so I replaced that. The next time he had a problem, a failed hard drive if I remember correctly, he opted to go with a 27" iMac. We never upgraded the PC, and we have never upgraded the iMac. Beyond this, I have converted his mom to an iMac and my parents from a PC to a Mac Mini. I would same the brother-in-law is a good example of the average Joe user where my parents and mother-in-law are below average, but generally speaking I would have to argue that people who upgrade their computers is probably significantly below 20%. Further, I would argue that those who upgrade beyond RAM or storage is probably more likely in the 5% range. All that said, with the vast number of computers out there it still makes a lot of since to cater to that community.
Sign In or Register to comment.