With more than $70B in cash, Apple could buy Nokia, RIM, HTC & Motorola

1911131415

Comments

  • Reply 201 of 290
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


    Yes, but the middle class is supposedly growing in other countries, like India and China. Perhaps they will buy our services. In theory. \



    Many services are local thus cannot be purchased by people in China or India.
  • Reply 202 of 290
    ivladivlad Posts: 742member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jj.yuan View Post


    If I were Steve Jobs, I would invest in R&D some more and develop more talents and products.



    You know Steve is not Apple. Apple is a collection of so many people, he can set direction to the company and really rule every little aspect of a product, but such decisions come from board of directors and other senior management.
  • Reply 203 of 290
    ivladivlad Posts: 742member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cameronj View Post


    If only the USA's economy was more like Japan's, things would be much better.



    That's not really possible because the US population is like 3 times of those 2 countries combined.
  • Reply 204 of 290
    jblongzjblongz Posts: 167member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by techno View Post


    Or they could manufacture their products in the US and create some jobs.



    Uh, lets keep all that manufacturing pollution as far as possible. People really don't know what they are asking for.
  • Reply 205 of 290
    mj1970mj1970 Posts: 9,002member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rivertrip View Post


    Instead of repeating the standard (disproved) Republican answer for everything, please just post a link to it. That would waste a lot less bandwidth.



    Instead of just casually rejecting a couple hundred years of economic observation, theory, and understanding, why don't you crack open a decent economics book. That would waste a lot less time.
  • Reply 206 of 290
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by a_greer View Post


    dont the chineese also buy American made stuff? mostly big stuff like cars, cranes (think caterpillar) and farm gear (think john deere)?



    we do have an imballance obviously but hey, one combine is equal to thousands of i-devices...



    You forgot Buick's, they buy tons of those. Really!!!
  • Reply 207 of 290
    mj1970mj1970 Posts: 9,002member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by a_greer View Post


    come on, we all know about Reaganomics, trickledown means that workers are the urinal cakes, hoping for a little trickle...



    Wealth is not a zero-sum game. It is a positive-sum game. Well...until the government steps it...then it is a negative-sum game.
  • Reply 208 of 290
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by garethmiller View Post


    http://www.uaw.org/story/union-plant...ivity-rankings



    Quote:"In fact, the latest industry data show members of the UAW and the Canadian Auto Workers (CAW) are already more efficient and productive than their nonunion counterparts."





    I just about rolled out of my chair laughing. You pulled a quote from the UAW to tell us how superior union workers are?!?!?!?!?!?
  • Reply 209 of 290
    mj1970mj1970 Posts: 9,002member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


    Yes but expenses have outgrown whatever wage increases there have been so it doesn't really matter.



    Well recently, because of The Fed's printing press, that's true. Otherwise it is less true.
  • Reply 210 of 290
    mmtm1983mmtm1983 Posts: 31member
    i remeber when they were saying 50 billion, man its getting bigger quicker and quicker, my guess and personal aim if i were in apple shoes right now would be to let it grow to around 100-250 Billion and then buy a few big boys, if you all remember steve did say along they line we have think big and invest in bigger things, so its going to happen at some point, and i'm not talking about buying these small companies for under a billion...



    possible targets:



    Sony (maybe)

    Sumsung

    Microsoft (maybe)

    sega

    nintendo



    next areas i see then entering into is TV market and games consoles, already in the portable games console market
  • Reply 211 of 290
    cloudgazercloudgazer Posts: 2,161member
    Everytime I see a gold-standard guy on a forum I want to beat them over the head with the USA's deflationary recession of the late 19th century which ended with the Gold Rush and the rampant Spanish inflation after the discovery of the New World. There's no good reason to tie your money supply to a totemic shiny metal, lets all stay in the 21st century please and not try to crawl back into the 19th.



    Fact is that inflation is a good thing in the midst of a deflationary recession, the Greeks would love a bit of inflation about now - along with a currency of their own that they could depreciate.
  • Reply 212 of 290
    cloudgazercloudgazer Posts: 2,161member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by garethmiller View Post


    2) It is possible to start from scratch in a country.



    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-13058866



    As you will all know Foxconn plan to do exactly that in Brazil, lack of manufacturing infrastructure or expertise is not the reason they choose not to manufacture in the US. That is down primarily to wages. (I hope the BBC link works in your country of residence, apologies if not).



    Actually as even the BBC hint, it's not primarily down to wages and a Reuters article on the same subject makes it clear. The decision by Foxconn to site a plant in Brazil is more related to high import tariffs in Brazil and Mercosur.



    Apple's cheapest iPad, for example, retails for about $860 in Brazil, versus $400 in the United States.



    Now I would argue that Brazil and the rest of Mercosur lose more from those import tariffs than they will gain, but that's a different discussion.
  • Reply 213 of 290
    woodlinkwoodlink Posts: 198member
    All that dough is in foreign bank accounts and would have to be repatriated...thus Apple would have to pay somewhere near ten percent just to move it back into the USA.



    Congress has toyed with the idea of passing a tax break to entice corporations like Apple (and some big pharma companies) to bring the money back in.



    In fact, Congress has done just that in the past. The problem was that companies just started putting even MORE money in foreign accounts with the idea that Congress would just legislate another tax break.



    That hasn't happened yet and may never.



    So, we'll have to stay tuned.



    But my guess for one use of the money is that Apple simply wants to keep it's cash because of Mr. Jobs tenuous health condition and when (we are all gonna die) he does pass away, the stock could plummet.



    Thus, Apple would be in a position to perform a stock buy back...



    One person's theory...
  • Reply 214 of 290
    kent909kent909 Posts: 731member
    I say they should buy AT&T and give every iPhone customer unlimited voice and data for $50/mo.
  • Reply 215 of 290
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,686member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post


    Instead of just casually rejecting a couple hundred years of economic observation, theory, and understanding, why don't you crack open a decent economics book. That would waste a lot less time.



    I noticed that you were silent about my post earlier: let me repeat it



    From 2004. In 1970 ( in 2004 dollars) the median male income was $28,100. In 2004 it was $30,513. I bet all gains, and any subsequent gains since 2004, have now been wiped out.



    Contrast that with the difference in the twenty years between 1950 and 1970. The median - in 2004 dollars again - went from $17,000 to $28,000. A gain which is 5 times higher than the 33 years from 1970-2004.





    Prior to that you were talking about the pie getting bigger for everybody, and posting the increase in total GDP in the last 30 years without mentioning how much went to capital and how of that GDP went to labour.



    Answer: more goes to capital. The question we are asking is why.



    Economics is not a real science by the way - I increasingly see it as an ideology, and no more scientific than other social sciences, albeit the only one which is right-leaning. It has little or no predictive power, and produces drones who repeat the Econ 101 as if it were the only Truth in the world.
  • Reply 216 of 290
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,686member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post


    Everytime I see a gold-standard guy on a forum I want to beat them over the head with the USA's deflationary recession of the late 19th century which ended with the Gold Rush and the rampant Spanish inflation after the discovery of the New World. There's no good reason to tie your money supply to a totemic shiny metal, lets all stay in the 21st century please and not try to crawl back into the 19th.



    The gold standard has to be imposed too. A real libertarian would allow banks to print money, not just the FED. And banks would cause booms and busts at more accelerated rates than now - assuming they all agreed to accept each other's currency.



    As for the gold standard - as you point out : nonsense. The amount of money would stay static when the number of goods increase causing deflation, and massively increase with a gold find causing inflation.



    This shiny metal has nothing to do with the real economy.
  • Reply 217 of 290
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,686member
    I am sure that nobody here is an anti-capitalist. Supporting Apple is not something that Marxists do, despite what I have read on some right wing blogs; nor are we in the main socialists, a socialist believes in re-distribution and the ownership of factories by governments.



    What I think is this: capitalism works better when workers have more power to bargain, something which can't happen now because of the ease of off-shoring etc. When it did happen, or when paternalistic capitalists like Ford realised that workers were consumers, thats when capitalism produced the great gains for worker's wages. Since most of us are workers that is what we should be interested in, not the ideological stance of pro-capitalists who think we should be happy just stand still in wages because capitalism is self-evidently better than anything else. Modern capitalism isnt better than a much better system: the capitalism which existed until modern capitalism, the one with a better distribution of wealth and income between classes.



    Long term that would be good for capitalists too.
  • Reply 218 of 290
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,686member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post


    Actually as even the BBC hint, it's not primarily down to wages and a Reuters article on the same subject makes it clear. The decision by Foxconn to site a plant in Brazil is more related to high import tariffs in Brazil and Mercosur.



    Apple's cheapest iPad, for example, retails for about $860 in Brazil, versus $400 in the United States.



    Now I would argue that Brazil and the rest of Mercosur lose more from those import tariffs than they will gain, but that's a different discussion.



    Ah - awesome post. Apple is absolutely nowhere in South America , if you remember the StatsCounter info I posted last week. Bada is doing better.



    Interesting that South America is doing what North America could also do - the only way to bring jobs to the west is protectionism.
  • Reply 219 of 290
    mj1970mj1970 Posts: 9,002member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by asdasd View Post


    I noticed that you were silent about my post earlier: let me repeat it



    From 2004. In 1970 ( in 2004 dollars) the median male income was $28,100. In 2004 it was $30,513. I bet all gains, and any subsequent gains since 2004, have now been wiped out.



    Contrast that with the difference in the twenty years between 1950 and 1970. The median - in 2004 dollars again - went from $17,000 to $28,000. A gain which is 5 times higher than the 33 years from 1970-2004.





    Prior to that you were talking about the pie getting bigger for everybody, and posting the increase in total GDP in the last 30 years without mentioning how much went to capital and how of that GDP went to labour.



    Answer: more goes to capital. The question we are asking is why.



    Economics is not a real science by the way - I increasingly see it as an ideology, and no more scientific than other social sciences, albeit the only one which is right-leaning. It has little or no predictive power, and produces drones who repeat the Econ 101 as if it were the only Truth in the world.



    A bit of advice: Avoid trying to pontificate on subjects you obviously know nothing about. It make you look foolish. Like now.
  • Reply 220 of 290
    mj1970mj1970 Posts: 9,002member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by asdasd View Post


    The gold standard has to be imposed too. A real libertarian would allow banks to print money, not just the FED. And banks would cause booms and busts at more accelerated rates than now - assuming they all agreed to accept each other's currency.



    As for the gold standard - as you point out : nonsense. The amount of money would stay static when the number of goods increase causing deflation, and massively increase with a gold find causing inflation.



    This shiny metal has nothing to do with the real economy.



    Here again...I suggest a little more study for you in this area.
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