Teardown of Apple's new Mac Mini reveals space for second hard drive

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  • Reply 21 of 50
    jj.yuanjj.yuan Posts: 212member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsblair View Post


    Cool...Looks like this will be my next purchase. Before switching to the mac last November I had been using an HP Windows Home Server to store music, videos and pictures for our household. I've been waiting for a mac mini refresh so that I can do away with the WHS!



    It feels that a NAS (possibly with RAID) would be sufficient?
  • Reply 22 of 50
    gmacgmac Posts: 77member
    If you have 2 drives in a mini can you RAID them?
  • Reply 23 of 50
    jeff66jeff66 Posts: 7member
    I'm disappointed that an option to include an SSD is not available except in the Server version. A Mac mini with an SSD and 8GB's of memory would be perfect as a desktop machine. Especially with thunderbolt connected storage. Not sure why its only available in the Server version.



    Sorry, I jumped the gun. Just noticed it is available in the high end desktop version. For an additional $600!
  • Reply 24 of 50
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


    Why should this be necessary? A card slot in the back is awkward, and having all the cables face the user is even more awkward. Your response just doesn't make any sense unless you're trying to parody an Apple apologist.



    No, seriously, why not have the end that you will use facing you? Easy to access the card slot, swap cables, and turn on and off. If it's behind a monitor, who cares? (unless it's in the living room, of course).
  • Reply 25 of 50
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,705member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post


    Apple is all over the place with Mac repairs and upgrades. You can't upgrade the hard drive in an iMac but you can screw with all the parts in the Mini.



    Changing the HD in an iMac is not hard, but it's harder (and first time you do it - scarier) than undoing four screws underneath or at the back and unhooking the drive.
  • Reply 26 of 50
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,705member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


    Why should this be necessary? A card slot in the back is awkward, and having all the cables face the user is even more awkward. Your response just doesn't make any sense unless you're trying to parody an Apple apologist.



    Yes, the card-slot should be at the front, or side. At the back with the cables is bad, or lazy design.
  • Reply 27 of 50
    srangersranger Posts: 473member
    If they had not ditched the DVD Drive I would get one. I use a 2.0Ghz Mini in a Home entertainment center and still have a larger DVD movie library ( And do not want spend countless hours ripping all of the movies ). I wanted to upgrade the Mini in the entertainment center and use the old one as a small Web/FTP server.



    I know that I could add the external super drive, but that would be one more thing cluttering up my system. In fact that is why I got the 2.0Ghz mini to dump the old clunky DVD player and have a much cleaner looking ( i.e. Wife approved ) entertainment system.



    P.S. Bought a 2.66Ghz from the refurb store instead. It is a shame that the DVD was not at least an option since it would obviously fit in the case. I guess if you were willing to cut a slot in the case it still would fit....
  • Reply 28 of 50
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,951member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jg-in-ct View Post


    No, seriously, why not have the end that you will use facing you? Easy to access the card slot, swap cables, and turn on and off. If it's behind a monitor, who cares? (unless it's in the living room, of course).



    I think that assumes that you're hiding the mini behind a monitor, which I don't think a lot of owners will do that, they'll have at least the front face visible under the edge of the monitor. And most of the other connectors probably aren't going to be touched nearly as often. Besides, the optical slot used to be on the front, so why not a little SD slot in its place?
  • Reply 29 of 50
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,951member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gmac View Post


    If you have 2 drives in a mini can you RAID them?



    I don't see why not. It would be just the basic software RAID, either kind you pick.
  • Reply 30 of 50
    cmf2cmf2 Posts: 1,427member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sranger View Post


    If they had not ditched the DVD Drive I would get one. I use a 2.0Ghz Mini in a Home entertainment center and still have a larger DVD movie library ( And do not want spend countless hours ripping all of the movies ). I wanted to upgrade the Mini in the entertainment center and use the old one as a small Web/FTP server.



    I know that I could add the external super drive, but that would be one more thing cluttering up my system. In fact that is why I got the 2.0Ghz mini to dump the old clunky DVD player and have a much cleaner looking ( i.e. Wife approved ) entertainment system.



    P.S. Bought a 2.66Ghz from the refurb store instead. It is a shame that the DVD was not at least an option since it would obviously fit in the case. I guess if you were willing to cut a slot in the case it still would fit....



    They did drop the base price by $100 though. A new mac mini + an external superdrive is still cheaper than the base price of the previous model. I don't think an external drive would really clutter up a media center (just put it on top of the mini and use a short USB cable to connect it).



    Congrats of the refurbished mini though. You got a really good deal on it since the removal of the optical drive and $100 price drop led to massive discounts on the previous gen refurb models



    As an aside, they redesigned the internals as a result of the DVD drive removal. I doubt it would fit without going back to the old internal design. One of the major benefits of the redesign is that both hard drive slots are easily accessible for upgrading. With the old two drive server models, you have to remove the logic board to get at the second hard drive. That's not the case anymore. There is some reason behind the madness.
  • Reply 31 of 50
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,951member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cmf2 View Post


    They did drop the base price by $100 though.



    What, when? The current base model is $599, the previous base model was $599.
  • Reply 32 of 50
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


    What, when? The current base model is $599, the previous base model was $599.



    No, the first gen of the redesign was $699.
  • Reply 33 of 50
    cmf2cmf2 Posts: 1,427member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


    What, when? The current base model is $599, the previous base model was $599.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    No, the first gen of the redesign was $699.



    Indeed, it was $699:



    http://www.engadget.com/2010/06/18/m...d-2010-review/
  • Reply 34 of 50
    phongphong Posts: 219member
    Quick technical question about these dual drives:



    If you get the BTO option with both the 256GB SSD and the 7200rpm drive with the SSD as the startup disk, can't the 7200rpm drive still produce an overall slowdown than with just the SSD alone?



    I've been using a 2010 Mac Mini with an SSD and would never go back, but my experience has been that whenever I connect an external USB drive, the speed advantages of the SSD almost completely disappear, at least when accessing the Finder. Using the Open File command in an app or opening a new Finder window after a while will cause the whole system to hang for a few seconds as the external USB drive starts to spin. It happens even when I don't even navigate to that drive. I'm assuming it has something to do with indexing or Spotlight or something, and that USB drives are simply just not that fast.



    When I disconnect the drive, everything's cool, but of course you can't just disconnect an internal drive. So I wonder if the internal drive will cause a similar slowdown. Does it create any kind bottleneck, however minor, that diminishes the advantage of having a singular SSD alone? Whst about an external Thunderbolt drive?
  • Reply 35 of 50
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,951member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    No, the first gen of the redesign was $699.



    I had forgotten about that, so it was something of a temporary price increase.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Phong View Post


    I've been using a 2010 Mac Mini with an SSD and would never go back, but my experience has been that whenever I connect an external USB drive, the speed advantages of the SSD almost completely disappear, at least when accessing the Finder. Using the Open File command in an app or opening a new Finder window after a while will cause the whole system to hang for a few seconds as the external USB drive starts to spin. It happens even when I don't even navigate to that drive. I'm assuming it has something to do with indexing or Spotlight or something, and that USB drives are simply just not that fast.



    That's one of the down sides of Finder, if one Finder window is stalled, the whole program stalls.



    Have you tried it with Lion yet?
  • Reply 36 of 50
    phongphong Posts: 219member
    No, but the problem isn't just the FInder. It's in any program that needs to open a file. I just hit command-O in Movist and waited a full five seconds just for the window to pop open. I wasn't even going to open something on an external drive either. And that was after I added the external volumes to Spotlight's privacy list.



    Unplug the external drives, though, and everything is snappy.
  • Reply 37 of 50
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,951member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Phong View Post


    No, but the problem isn't just the FInder. It's in any program that needs to open a file. I just hit command-O in Movist and waited a full five seconds just for the window to pop open. I wasn't even going to open something on an external drive either. And that was after I added the external volumes to Spotlight's privacy list.



    Unplug the external drives, though, and everything is snappy.



    Does it do that even if you aren't opening a file in the external drive?



    I think what you were probably seeing is that the software (or maybe OS) is waiting for the drive to wake up, it spins down if it is not accessed often enough.
  • Reply 38 of 50
    nvidia2008nvidia2008 Posts: 9,262member
    Personally, I don't understand them ditching the optical drive. Strategically, obviously it has to do with driving everything to digital downloads. Got to hand it to Apple, it can be extremely frustrating but they really don't worry about getting sales from people that they're not likely to get sales from... Blue ocean all the way.
  • Reply 39 of 50
    nvidia2008nvidia2008 Posts: 9,262member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gmac View Post


    If you have 2 drives in a mini can you RAID them?



    If the drive is recognised by the system, yeah. OS X supports that. You can plug in 2 USB drives and make a RAID out of it, for example... You can play around with OS X's built-in RAID using Disk Utility. https://discussions.apple.com/thread...art=0&tstart=0
  • Reply 40 of 50
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,951member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post


    Personally, I don't understand them ditching the optical drive. Strategically, obviously it has to do with driving everything to digital downloads. Got to hand it to Apple, it can be extremely frustrating but they really don't worry about getting sales from people that they're not likely to get sales from... Blue ocean all the way.



    I don't think it's that big of a deal now.



    If that's what they needed to fit the target price, fine with me. I hope to get one to use as a small business server with an attached Drobo or two. Also, it's easier to get inside now. Something like 5 steps to the drive instead of 27 with the previous model. I have another Macs to read from on the occasion it needs to read an optical disc. Most of the software I use has long been available on my local network or an internet download.



    I won't give up the drive on my main computer though. I find writing a disc is the most convenient way to hand a fair amount of data to someone, without giving away a USB stick (seriously, who remembers to return them?) or walking them through a computer-to-computer internet data transfer.
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