AT&T confirms plan to throttle heaviest unlimited data users Oct 1

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 64
    asciiascii Posts: 5,936member
    That's how my wired Internet already works. If I download more than 150G/month the speed drops right down until the next month. Not that I have ever hit that limit, but other people I know have.
  • Reply 22 of 64
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by satcomer View Post


    What is the excessive use to AT&T? 2G/month or 5G/month?



    Uh, they've CLEARLY stated that it's the top 5% of users... a group of users that will be constantly changing and fluctuate without warning or prior notification. Duh!



    Quote:

    As a grandfathered AT&T customer I am feeling like they don't appreciate me as a user.



    It's a telecom. They don't give a flying frick about users, and they never have. Not even after the monopoly breakup.
  • Reply 23 of 64
    jd_in_sbjd_in_sb Posts: 1,600member
    AT&T says the move against unlimited accounts "is designed to improve the experience for the rest of its users. " But they dont' care about the rest of the users if the data guzzler does not have an unlimited account and is paying for it. That is an odd message to send to their customers.
  • Reply 24 of 64
    sailorpaulsailorpaul Posts: 322member
    This is a clear reason for the T-Mobile acquisition to never go through.
  • Reply 25 of 64
    mactacmactac Posts: 315member
    But I thought we were supposed to embrace the cloud and throw away all physical media and bask in the glory of an unlimited high speed utopia forever?
  • Reply 26 of 64
    dave8o4dave8o4 Posts: 5member
    Instead of posting your discontent here and rambling on and on, Put your thoughts to work and try here instead.



    Randall Stephenson, AT&T CEO

    [email protected] (direct)

    [email protected]

    fax 210-351-3553

    Phone: 210-821-4105 (headquarters, press 3, ask for Mr. Stephenson's office)

    175 E. Houston

    San Antonio, TX 78205



    a ton of good old fashion snail mail does wonders...



    Headquarters mailing address is

    208 S. Akard St.

    Dallas, TX 75202
  • Reply 27 of 64
    Throttling is such BS, wireless or otherwise.



    How does throttling back a certain group of users *after* an arbitrary point each month "improve the experience" for everyone else *before* that point is reached?



    What, do their routers overheat after they've passed X amount of data and have to cool down for the rest of the month?



    But up until that tragic point in time, they're fine and can run at full speed 24/7.
  • Reply 28 of 64
    applezillaapplezilla Posts: 941member
    So because they don't like the plan they sold me, I have to be penalized?



    The consumer as second-class citizen. Teabagger heaven.
  • Reply 29 of 64
    applezillaapplezilla Posts: 941member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mbarriault View Post


    Americans: Welcome to Canada.



    Ok, but we get Canada's universal health care too. Right?
  • Reply 30 of 64
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleZilla View Post


    Ok, but we get Canada's universal health care too. Right?



    Provided the Second Great Depression doesn't start in four days, I think.
  • Reply 31 of 64
    applezillaapplezilla Posts: 941member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    Provided the Second Great Depression doesn't start in four days, I think.



    True that. As soon as seniors, who helped vote these idiots in, miss a SS check or a Medicare reimbursement, they will realize their mistake.



    Or not.



    Oh well. Somebody has to supply the Soylent Green.
  • Reply 32 of 64
    kent909kent909 Posts: 731member
    Well I guess as the provider they can do what they want. I as the consumer can do as I wish. To me it is not the cost or the limits. For me it is the secrecy. My unlimited plan does not show me how much I have used. As pointed out in previous posts, saying top the 5% is vague and cannot be verified. Since I can't see how much I have used, I will have absolutely no way of knowing if I am getting close. It is just important for me to remember that I made it through the first 59 years of my life without a 3G iPad. I guess I won't parish if I give it up and let AT&T make their money off of someone else.



  • Reply 33 of 64
    faxthatfaxthat Posts: 64member
    Maybe if the AT&T mucky-mucks didn't take umpteen millions in bonuses, they could afford to live up to their agreement to provide unlimited data. What language do you have to translate "unlimited" into to get it to mean "limited."
  • Reply 34 of 64
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,951member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nanonanu View Post


    Throttling is such BS, wireless or otherwise.



    How does throttling back a certain group of users *after* an arbitrary point each month "improve the experience" for everyone else *before* that point is reached?



    What, do their routers overheat after they've passed X amount of data and have to cool down for the rest of the month?



    But up until that tragic point in time, they're fine and can run at full speed 24/7.



    Hypothetically, the point is that one heavy user takes the bandwidth of a dozen other users, a tower can only transmit so much bitrate. Some cities are really at a choking point, or at least were, SF was one, but that is more due to the regulatory environment that lets NIMBYs block cell towers on over hyped and likely irrational radiation fears.



    But do I trust them to be telling the truth? Nah.
  • Reply 35 of 64
    rot'napplerot'napple Posts: 1,839member
    How does one tell, unless they ran a speed test, that they have been throttled?



    My iPad with Unlimited ATT 3G at times just spins it's wheels pulling up a standard web page or checking e-mail and I know I don't use 3G that often thanks to wifi at home and elsewhere.



    Does throttling revert 3G back to Edge speeds? Curious to know if anyone has been throttled? How they knew and how their device acted (ie slooooow)

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  • Reply 36 of 64
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by faxthat View Post


    Maybe if the AT&T mucky-mucks didn't take umpteen millions in bonuses, they could afford to live up to their agreement to provide unlimited data. What language do you have to translate "unlimited" into to get it to mean "limited."



    Let's find out! Google Translate, ho!



    Well, starting with 'unlimited' and moving from English-Dutch-Macedonian-Swahili-Croatian-Slovenian-Hindi-Bulgarian-Slovenian-English-Korean-Tamil-Belarusian-Irish–Yiddish-English...



    ...we get 'manifest'.



    Well, can't win them all, AT&T.
  • Reply 37 of 64
    Civil lawsuit.



    Class-action this mofo, stat.
  • Reply 38 of 64
    Does anyone, beside me, think it's funny how usa cell phone customers pay more than customer in other countries. Add to that the fact that you never hear anything about over seas users being throttled. Could it be because they have anywhere from 15% to 50% more throughput because those cell phone companies spent "real" money on infrastructure. It's such a shame that we keep paying more & getting less but no one in Washington cares to do anything about it.
  • Reply 39 of 64
    whozownwhozown Posts: 128member
    How much do you have to consume to be not he 5%? I got unlimited and I average about 6gigs a month.
  • Reply 40 of 64
    nvidia2008nvidia2008 Posts: 9,262member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Lancelot9201 View Post


    Does anyone, beside me, think it's funny how usa cell phone customers pay more than customer in other countries. Add to that the fact that you never hear anything about over seas users being throttled. Could it be because they have anywhere from 15% to 50% more throughput because those cell phone companies spent "real" money on infrastructure. It's such a shame that we keep paying more & getting less but no one in Washington cares to do anything about it.



    Nah, throttling happens all over the world. But the broadband situation in the USA is not stellar compared to many developed countries.



    In 2000-2001 I had to wait six months before my SBC DSL in San Francisco was "provisioned" or what not. 10 years later...
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