Post-Steve Jobs Apple likened to departures of Walt Disney, Henry Ford

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 43
    Well, he ain't going very far, since he's now board chairman. He just won't have day-to-day responsibilities, but will have long-term focus



    Comparison to Disney isn't all that flattering considering that Disney floundered for many years after Walt D passed. It wasn't until they hired their first outsider, Eisner, that Disney got its groove back



    Cheers !
  • Reply 22 of 43
    jasenj1jasenj1 Posts: 922member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Sandman619 View Post


    Comparison to Disney isn't all that flattering considering that Disney floundered for many years after Walt D passed. It wasn't until they hired their first outsider, Eisner, that Disney got its groove back



    I hope post-Steve Apple can continue to raise up competent CEOs and other leadership from within. It seems that bringing in outside talent often leads to loss of corporate identity and the chasing of short-term profits & efficiencies. See HP.



    May Steve spend more time with his family and enjoy a slower pace of life for a long time.



    - Jasen.
  • Reply 23 of 43
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mzaslove View Post


    And he DID NOT "save Disney." He didn't run Eisner out either.



    Eisner was a worthless corporate tool, and Katzenburg - please. His current company, Dreamworks, is, how can I put this - in the toilet. From Wiki:



    DreamWorks had come close to bankruptcy twice. Under Katzenberg's watch, the studio suffered a $125 million loss on Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas,[7] and also overestimated the DVD demand for Shrek 2.[8] In 2005, out of their two large budget pictures, The Island bombed at the domestic box office...



    Yeah, Katzenberg's got some mad skillz all right.



    Pixar people have been credited with reinvigorating Disney's animation division - they basically started by reworking 'Bolt', which was moderately successful, and Disney's rudderless animation department found direction and life after that. Pixar's people (mainly Lassiter) have also been put in charge of 'reimagining' Disney's theme parks.



    Disney was going nowhere before Pixar came along. Get a clue. Or I guess you can just keep writing in all caps. That makes it sound like you know what you're talking about.
  • Reply 24 of 43
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mister Snitch View Post


    Eisner was a worthless corporate tool. Pixar people have been credited with reinvigorating Disney's animation division - they basically started by reworking 'Bolt', which was moderately successful, and Disney's rudderless animation department found direction and life after that. Pixar's people (mainly Lassiter) have also been put in charge of 'reimagining' Disney's theme parks.



    Actually, having worked at Disney (you can look up my credits if you want) and worked with Eisner, he was anything but a tool. He was on the downturn of his career arc there and after Katzenberg left (another interesting guy to work with), it was a long slow downturn. You meet those guys? Work with them? Been part of the feature and TV departments before and after? I know I have. How about you?



    And caps for a couple words as emphasis is a legitimate way of reenforcing the point. Sorry if it bent you out of shape.
  • Reply 25 of 43
    macrulezmacrulez Posts: 2,455member
    deleted
  • Reply 26 of 43
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 5,014member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cajun View Post


    As I see it, Apple is good for the next few years. They can just go through rounds of maintenance upgrades on their existing products -- faster processor, more megapixels, more resolution, more storage, etc -- while keeping their ear to the ground for new features to add in.



    Steve may have even laid out the plans for a new product category or two. If that's the case, I give it five years before they truly reach the end of the Steve Jobs era.



    The real question is, Once they've gotten beyond the direct influence of Steve Jobs, can Apple still be a visionary company? Can they still out-innovate the PC industry? Will they still take the big risks to reap the big rewards? And most importantly, will they be right about it?





    I suspect the jobs vision and products idea are more than two years out, when Steve was there in the 80's he had a 20 yr vision of what computers. telecom, media and content was going to look like and we living that vision today, he came back in the 90's and got apple back on track of that original vision. I suspect that there is new roadmap with a another 20 yrs or so of vision and they will just crunch along as they did in the last 10 yrs. The only difference today from when he was forces out in the 80's they brought in people from the outside to run the company according to wallstreet and mindless MBA thought a good company should be. Today, they people taking over were hand picked by Jobs so they I hope they understand his vision.
  • Reply 27 of 43
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member
    Until and unless I see Apple release a new disruptive, market-redefining product like the iPhone, I will assume those blow-your-hair-back days are over.



    I'm sorry but I just really believe in the power of the individual. I do believe the iPhone 5 and iPad 3 and 2012 Macs will be sexy, and Apple will make a lot of money. But will they do the impossible any more?



    Such as... when people said the cellphone market had tight competition and razor thin margins and there was no point entering, and then Steve Jobs came along and the rest is history. In retrospect the opening was obvious: the existing phones were shite. But everything is obvious in retrospect. It takes a Jobs or a Ford to see these opportunities up front.
  • Reply 28 of 43
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post


    The outcome may be different, but if you believe Walt Disney had no vision you're living on another planet.



    Amen to that. Having been an Apple and Disney fan for many decades I'm constantly reminded and amazed at the vision of Walt and Steve. Looking at wait-times on my iPhone app for Haunted Mansion really drives the point home!
  • Reply 29 of 43
    Steve Jobs leaving Apple fills me with an intense and brooding sense of impending loss. No man who has so brilliantly led and built such an amazing business leaves it unless he has to. I don't want to suggest what Steve's departure from Apple signifies, i only wish it wasn't so.



    Since returning to Apple, Steve has set out to build a company that was bigger than any individual person in it, including himself. The top team is probably the strongest of any global top business. Even so, Steve's personality is so strong, so magnetic, that Apple running without his day-to-day micromanagement style is hard to imagine.



    Is Steve without faults? Of course not, he is human like the rest of us. But as humans go, he is first among equals. I think it is entirely appropriate to compare him to Ford and Disney. Jobs is also a pioneering visionary who has made life better for ordinary people. Technology for the masses. His contribution is more than just the the Mac, the GUI, the iPod, the iPhone, and the iPad. it is an approach to business that defines 21st century commerce.



    I sure hope this isn't the end, whatever it is, i wish Steve the very best.
  • Reply 30 of 43
    recrec Posts: 217member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ascii View Post


    Until and unless I see Apple release a new disruptive, market-redefining product like the iPhone, I will assume those blow-your-hair-back days are over.



    I'm sorry but I just really believe in the power of the individual. I do believe the iPhone 5 and iPad 3 and 2012 Macs will be sexy, and Apple will make a lot of money. But will they do the impossible any more?



    Such as... when people said the cellphone market had tight competition and razor thin margins and there was no point entering, and then Steve Jobs came along and the rest is history. In retrospect the opening was obvious: the existing phones were shite. But everything is obvious in retrospect. It takes a Jobs or a Ford to see these opportunities up front.



    Yes. It's called the TV, and this disruption will happen again. Those wheels have already been set in motion.
  • Reply 31 of 43
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    "Similar to the departure of Henry Ford, Walt Disney -- unique creative forces whose companies carried on for years -- Apple without Steve will go on,"







    From Wikipedia:



    Henry Ford departs:



    "In 1919, Edsel Ford succeeded his father as president of the company,... the company used an old-fashioned personalized management system, and neglected consumer demand for improved vehicles. ...Ford steadily lost market share to GM and Chrysler, as these and other domestic and foreign competitors began offering fresher automobiles with more innovative features..."





    Walt Disney dies:



    "On December 15, 1966, Walt Disney died of lung cancer, and Roy Disney took over as chairman, CEO, and president of the company....



    Despite the success of the Disney Channel and its new theme park creations, Walt Disney Productions was financially vulnerable. Its film library was valuable, but offered few current successes, and its leadership team was unable to keep up with other studios, "









    Were Ford and Disney really the best examples that these analysts could come up with? It sounds like misguided optimism to me.
  • Reply 32 of 43
    recrec Posts: 217member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tailpipe View Post


    Steve Jobs leaving Apple fills me with an intense and brooding sense of impending loss. No man who has so brilliantly led and built such an amazing business leaves it unless he has to. I don't want to suggest what Steve's departure from Apple signifies, i only wish it wasn't so.



    Since returning to Apple, Steve has set out to build a company that was bigger than any individual person in it, including himself. The top team is probably the strongest of any global top business. Even so, Steve's personality is so strong, so magnetic, that Apple running without his day-to-day micromanagement style is hard to imagine.



    Is Steve without faults? Of course not, he is human like the rest of us. But as humans go, he is first among equals. I think it is entirely appropriate to compare him to Ford and Disney. Jobs is also a pioneering visionary who has made life better for ordinary people. Technology for the masses. His contribution is more than just the the Mac, the GUI, the iPod, the iPhone, and the iPad. it is an approach to business that defines 21st century commerce.



    I sure hope this isn't the end, whatever it is, i wish Steve the very best.



    I prefer to see this in a much more positive light. He hasn't left the company, and if it's true his health is stable then he's gonna be around for some time.



    They executed a slow succession plan that was best for the company. He's demoting himself to chairman of the board (not an insignificant role) and not actually leaving. For all we know he'll keep that role till his death in 30 years. As chairman he can still be involved in his company and it's products. He may even pick a new CEO after Tim leaves.



    As chairman he can definitely guide products, although maybe only from 30,000 feet. Still if the chairman Steven P Jobs comes to your group within Apple and wants to give your group some guidance, who would tell him no?



    What they did was best for the stockholders, the company and his health and probably won't change a thing in all practicality. It may help him live longer which will only help Apple.
  • Reply 33 of 43
    haggarhaggar Posts: 1,568member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jasenj1 View Post


    I hope post-Steve Apple can continue to raise up competent CEOs and other leadership from within. It seems that bringing in outside talent often leads to loss of corporate identity and the chasing of short-term profits & efficiencies. See HP.



    Tim Cook worked at Compaq and IBM before being hired at Apple. Should Apple only hire and promote from within? Should Apple start an internal breeding program for future Apple employees?
  • Reply 34 of 43
    macrulezmacrulez Posts: 2,455member
    deleted
  • Reply 35 of 43
    I would suggest that they go out and retain Guy Kawasaki again. He's got the swagger that will be needed at the keynotes and product announcements. That was one of the hallmarks of Apple was the riveting product announcements that MADE you want to go out and buy the new product.
  • Reply 36 of 43
    macrulezmacrulez Posts: 2,455member
    deleted
  • Reply 37 of 43
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by IQ78 View Post


    Does that make sense?



    Yes, but that means it doesn't describe the stock market.

    :-)
  • Reply 38 of 43
    Ignoring their business record, Ford was a notorious anti-semite whose book The International Jew and articles inspired young Nazis and was the only American to be mentioned in Mein Kampf ("the great Ford, to their [Jewish bankers] fury, still maintains full independence"); Disney sanctioned anti-semitism without censure in his company and was an informant against others for HUAC.



    Jobs is far far beyond their class as a person.
  • Reply 39 of 43
    How about comparing jobs to Akio Morita of Sony who had the vision to develop the walkman. In the late 70s and 80s SONY was the top in music players and TVs. Sadly Morita left SONY and it lost its vision. A possible out come for Apple, maybe but no one can predict the future and even if Steve stayed who knows he may of run out of gas too. when you look at Apple products for the last few years they are pretty much the same with just bells and whistles added to the computers. With the exception of the iPhone and iPad which most likely won't change much from the initial design.
  • Reply 40 of 43
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tailpipe View Post


    Steve Jobs leaving Apple fills me with an intense and brooding sense of impending loss. No man who has so brilliantly led and built such an amazing business leaves it unless he has to. I don't want to suggest what Steve's departure from Apple signifies, i only wish it wasn't so.



    Since returning to Apple, Steve has set out to build a company that was bigger than any individual person in it, including himself. The top team is probably the strongest of any global top business. Even so, Steve's personality is so strong, so magnetic, that Apple running without his day-to-day micromanagement style is hard to imagine.



    Is Steve without faults? Of course not, he is human like the rest of us. But as humans go, he is first among equals. I think it is entirely appropriate to compare him to Ford and Disney. Jobs is also a pioneering visionary who has made life better for ordinary people. Technology for the masses. His contribution is more than just the the Mac, the GUI, the iPod, the iPhone, and the iPad. it is an approach to business that defines 21st century commerce.



    I sure hope this isn't the end, whatever it is, i wish Steve the very best.



    If you look carefully at all that has been written about Apple - you can see that Steve brought the same level of detail and ruthlessness to how he built Apple as a company as he did with the products. This speaks volumes to your concerns about what will happen to Apple - shoert- and long-term.
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