Microsoft faces iPad, iWorks without articulated plan for Windows 8 Office

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  • Reply 101 of 127
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by krabbelen View Post


    Uh, no, it's quite simply that MS equivocates all the time, may introduce something to be released a year later, but end up dropping it.



    Steven Sinofsky.
  • Reply 102 of 127
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Jacksons View Post


    DED must have rolling fits of laughter as he spins his web of misinformation. I think he thinks he is a bit like Steve by having his own reality distortion field. I certainly continue to be amazed at how many people take what he says at face value.



    Anyway, good work on the fact finding.



    Well, if you could make something out of Ballmer's quote, good on you. Yeah, I am sure they are working on supporting their platforms, too. Oh, they think that's important? Fills me with confidence and the fuzzy wuzzies. Talk about spin -- from a CEO no less.



    Steve Jobs would be like: "there will be iPad versions of all three iWork Apps released alongside iPad on day one. We have been reworking them for the touch-based iOS interface and we really think you will like them as much as we do." ...iOS iWork apps have been in top ten grossing apps on iTunes App Store from day one.



    DED is a blog writer, not a journalist, and as such it is not putting words in Ballmer's mouth to observe that there is some lack of straightforwardness there, and that going by their track record, MS may or may not be able to execute well on whatever plans it does have, since these ambiguous plans may or may not depend on other stuff that may or may not be finalized. lol. (but yeah, if he attributes something as a direct quote it ought to be backed up.)



    But if you call that gobbledegook from Balmer (as quoted by you) an "articulated plan for Windows 8 Office", then you are the king of spin! lol. I think DED was trying to make sense of his dribble and actually give him the benefit of the doubt.
  • Reply 103 of 127
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Office users were just beginning to accept the new Ribbon interface (and Office for Mac users were just getting the first sight of the Ribbon) when Apple released its multitouch versions of iWork apps for iPad. Rather than putting more buttons and controls into a busy toolbar, Apple stripped complexity from the iWorks interface to make it more useful to mobile users. At the same time, Apple began work on iCloud, enabling iWork users on Macs and iOS devices to keep their document changes updated across all their devices.





    When DED says "Apple stipped complexity" does he really mean stripped functionality? I don't use iWork on either the Mac or iPad but ultimately unless the iPad version does everything the Mac version does then its not the same product. It cant be a case that to make the toolbar look nice you just take half the buttons away otherwise your making your product worse for any serious user.



    At work the number of uses I have for Word are limited but when I do use it, I tend to need to do stuff like hierarchy charts, tables etc. On Word I've found the amazingly easy to do, just clicking a couple of buttons on the ribbon and choosing the design you want. So my test for Pages on the iPad would be how easy is it to add a hierarchy chart? Can anyone answer.
  • Reply 104 of 127
    macrulezmacrulez Posts: 2,455member
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  • Reply 105 of 127
    macrulezmacrulez Posts: 2,455member
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  • Reply 106 of 127
    macrulezmacrulez Posts: 2,455member
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  • Reply 107 of 127
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ricardo Dawkins View Post


    buahahahahahaha. Comencing attack w/o a server version of your OS. Good luck!



    Its called "MacOS Server".

    http://www.apple.com/server/



    And since MacOS is UNIX based... well you get the idea. One hell of a nice Server platform.
  • Reply 108 of 127
    macrulezmacrulez Posts: 2,455member
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  • Reply 109 of 127
    macrulezmacrulez Posts: 2,455member
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  • Reply 110 of 127
    macrulezmacrulez Posts: 2,455member
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  • Reply 111 of 127
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Jacksons View Post


    Speaking of insecure: http://www.bgr.com/2011/09/19/os-x-l...your-password/



    Where that is a major security flaw, I'm not about to let a stranger into my home to type those commands into my computer. With the now complete ASLR in Lion and other such security enhancements, they would have to put in a lot of effort just to get into the machine to execute the scripts. Plus it appears that these scripts are run from the terminal, so the malicious user would need access via SSH or Remote Desktop, the former of which is nearly impossible to break in to without the required keys, and both are disabled by default. Therefore putting this kind of security threat into the "very unlikely" category.



    If this was in Snow Leopard, when the ASLR was incomplete, I would then start clawing at the System Preferences enabling stealth mode, but its not, its Lion. Sooooooo... nothing to worry about
  • Reply 112 of 127
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post


    One of the most useful posts here on AI ever.



    Nice wish list. I'd like to see those.



    Didn't Apple file a patent for a touch screen with haptic feedback? Off the top of my head I believe it was something along the lines of each pixel being able to rise and fall on the screen creating the feel of a physical button. It was something like that, can't remember the specifics.
  • Reply 113 of 127
    macrulezmacrulez Posts: 2,455member
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  • Reply 114 of 127
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post


    They may well have, and IIRC my iPad2 does provide some haptic feedback when I type, no? (I don't have it with me right now so I can't check that)



    But what impressed me more about Applebaum's post were the adaptive elements. Now that's something I haven't seen yet, and may well be worth researching.



    No the iPad2 does not provide haptic. Sadly. Maybe you just hit the screen with such force you feel the pain on your finger tips



    Yes they do indeed sound rather interesting.
  • Reply 115 of 127
    iqatedoiqatedo Posts: 1,762member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post


    ...



    Why do you suppose Numbers has not been recognized as the paradigm-shifting spreadsheet we've all been waiting for?



    I believe it is, but I seem to be in a small crowd with that opinion, while the rest of the world seems to find Excel adequate.



    For me, the biggest failing in Numbers is its very poor data parsing facility, which is almost non-existent. I open Excel only to parse data, even at the least complex level.



    All the same, I use Mathematica almost exclusively and so, am not too fussed.
  • Reply 116 of 127
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post


    For me, the biggest failing in Numbers is its very poor data parsing facility, which is almost non-existent. I open Excel only to parse data, even at the least complex level.



    All the same, I use Mathematica almost exclusively and so, am not too fussed.



    The one thing I do not like about excel is how it handles time.

    Because of its poor time handling I almost got paid something like £60, instead of nearly £1k for a job I did.



    For example:

    If someone works from 9am to 5pm, thats an 8 hour day. Excel works that out nicely.

    Factor in the wages of £5 an hour an excel comes back with £1.67 for an 8 hour day.





    Turns out to be a bug where you have to multiply the result by 24. Though I use the word "bug" loosely, since its been like this since the very early days of excel.
  • Reply 117 of 127
    iqatedoiqatedo Posts: 1,762member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by benanderson89 View Post


    The one thing I do not like about excel is how it handles time.

    Because of its poor time handling I almost got paid something like £60, instead of nearly £1k for a job I did.



    For example:

    If someone works from 9am to 5pm, thats an 8 hour day. Excel works that out nicely.

    Factor in the wages of £5 an hour an excel comes back with £1.67 for an 8 hour day.





    Turns out to be a bug where you have to multiply the result by 24. Though I use the word "bug" loosely, since its been like this since the very early days of excel.



    Actually, one of Numbers' strengths I believe, at least under iOS, is the handling of dates/time. Very nice. I use Numbers on the iPad quite happily for certain number entry functions, where inputs are mixed date, time and numeric data.
  • Reply 118 of 127
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post


    Actually, one of Numbers' strengths I believe, at least under iOS, is the handling of dates/time. Very nice. I use Numbers on the iPad quite happily for certain number entry functions, where inputs are mixed date, time and numeric data.



    It does very well at handling date and time - I use it to track payments, programming work, wages etc on my iPad.



    Its all because excel stores time as a floating point value between 0 and 1. 8:00 is 0.333333r, for example. This is why 8:00 * £5 ended up as £1.67.
  • Reply 119 of 127
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    You're in top passive-aggressive form today! Congratulations.



    (For the record, Steve Jobs would not say so).



    that was awesome
  • Reply 120 of 127
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post


    Listen:



    Do you want to know a secret?

    Do you promise not to tell?

    Move closer. Let me whisper in your ear:



    No one gives a rat's ass about iWork at all, despite M$ not introducing iOS versions of Word and Excel.



    Except that Pages, Keynote and Numbers for iPad are respectively #1, 6 and 12 in the paid app top-charts in the App Store.
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