Uni-body casing manufacturer shutdown may affect Mac notebook shipments

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 31
    Just how strange does an odour have to be for it to cause a chinese factory to get shut down?



    Maybe someone opened some surströmming.
  • Reply 22 of 31
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by marokero View Post


    Maybe a Taco Bell opened near the factory recently, most of the workers wanted to get a taste of it... Why is manufacturing like this not done here in the US when we need jobs here. Once these cheap labor wake up to the fact they are underpaid, maybe we'll see manufacturing come back state side.



    These jobs will not be moved to the US. If China's wages become too high, these jobs will be moved instead to other countries like India or Vietnam. This process repeats itself until the whole world becomes much more developed. Unless something bad happens to the US economy that causes the average wage to fall down to India's level, these jobs will not be moved to the US.



    Apple sales are increasing so rapidly worldwide that the US cannot even provide sufficient workers, unless they hire skilled worker off someone else.
  • Reply 23 of 31
    Where is the original link of the news? Sure something stinks! It is called timing. The company is releasing their earnings after market closes! It is those short traders trying to cover before the record quarter once again!
  • Reply 24 of 31
    onhkaonhka Posts: 1,025member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    1) It's refreshing to hear about a factory issue in China that doesn't include a body count.



    2) I'd think Apple has other companies lined up that would love to get their business so I don't expect to see any major slowdown in sales.



    Like it never happens here.

    Quote:

    4,547 workers were killed on the job in 2010 [BLS 2010 preliminary workplace fatality data] (3.5 per 100,000 full–time equivalent workers) – more than 87 a week or more than 12 deaths every day. (This is a slight decline from the 4,551, fatal work injuries in 2009)



    682 Hispanic or Latino workers were killed from work–related injuries in 2010 – more than 13 deaths a week



    "Every day in America, 12 people go to work and never come home. Every year in America, 3.3 million people suffer a workplace injury from which they may never recover. These are preventable tragedies that disable our workers, devastate our families, and damage our economy." – Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis, April 28, 2011 blog



    "A March 2010 Liberty Mutual Insurance company report showed that the most disabling injuries (those involving six or more days away from work) cost American employers more than $53 billion a year – over $1 billion a week - in workers' compensation costs alone." – OSHA Assistant Secretary David Michaels, April 14, 2011



    http://www.osha.gov/oshstats/commonstats.html



    VS. China

    Quote:

    Industrial accident and death rates in China are among the highest in the world, killing more than 100,000 people every year. The industrial death rate in 3.85 per 100,000 in 2005. More than 127, 000 people are killed in work-related accidents in 2005, down from more than 140,000 in 2002, and down from 109,000 in 2000. That works out to 380 deaths per day.



    http://factsanddetails.com/china.php...subcatid=60#02



    And it wasn't that long ago in the US

    Quote:

    The dangers of work are usually measured by the number of injuries or fatalities occurring to a group of workers, usually over a period of one year. Over the past century such measures reveal a striking improvement in the safety of work in all the advanced countries. In part this has been the result of the gradual shift of jobs from relatively dangerous goods production such as farming, fishing, logging, mining, and manufacturing into such comparatively safe work as retail trade and services. But even the dangerous trades are now far safer than they were in 1900. To take but one example, mining today remains a comparatively risky activity. Its annual fatality rate is about nine for every one hundred thousand miners employed. A century ago in 1900 about three hundred out of every one hundred thousand miners were killed on the job each year.



    http://eh.net/encyclopedia/article/a...y.workplace.us



    Accidental death is sad in any case, no matter where. Except perhaps, if it were to happen on Wall Street.
  • Reply 25 of 31
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,492member
    Of all the processes Apple is involved in that could be moved to the US I would have thought milling unibodies would me the most possible. It is surely a process that could be virtually 100% done by robots ... with Siri in charge?



    Of course the shells are probably needed there in China for assembly thus making my point moot Then again assembly could also be done by robots I'd have thought ... Come on Apple think different and have Macs making Macs and iPads and iPhones etc. here in the USA. It might not create many jobs but robots need work too! Seriously, I am waiting for the next Apple big thing to be in robotics ....
  • Reply 26 of 31
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,492member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Onhka View Post


    Like it never happens here.





    VS. China





    And it wasn't that long ago in the US





    Accidental death is sad in any case, no matter where. Except perhaps, if it were to happen on Wall Street.



    Some shouldn't be accidental on Wall Street!
  • Reply 27 of 31
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,492member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by radster360 View Post


    Where is the original link of the news? Sure something stinks! It is called timing. The company is releasing their earnings after market closes! It is those short traders trying to cover before the record quarter once again!



    I am glad I have always been in AAPL for the long haul and don't even have to read about these shenanigans (even if this isn't one plenty of such stories are I agree). I bought in the 30's and 70's for the most part and intend to sell when they hit 1,000
  • Reply 28 of 31
    xsuxsu Posts: 401member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by 801 View Post


    If this was a company owned by one of the Chinese generals, or some connected hack, this would have never happened. But being owned by a foreign entity, and twiwanese at that, I am certain that all safety regulations must be followed, to the letter and beyond. That's how capitalism works there.



    BS. Foreign companies get away with just as much if not more than local companies. Just check out how long it took for ConocoPhillips to even stop production on the oil platform that started leaking oil in the early summer, and we still don't have a definitive confirmation that the leak has stopped. As for fines, compensations, or at least appologies, none whatsoever has been announced.
  • Reply 29 of 31
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


    I am glad I have always been in AAPL for the long haul and don't even have to read about these shenanigans (even if this isn't one plenty of such stories are I agree). I bought in the 30's and 70's for the most part and intend to sell when they hit 1,000



    I am with you also. Though I didn't buy mine as low as you did, but will cash in 3rd at 600 than at 800 and last 3rd at 1000
  • Reply 30 of 31
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,625member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by marokero View Post


    Maybe a Taco Bell opened near the factory recently, most of the workers wanted to get a taste of it... Why is manufacturing like this not done here in the US when we need jobs here. Once these cheap labor wake up to the fact they are underpaid, maybe we'll see manufacturing come back state side.



    It's never going to come back. Chinese factory workers make about $130 a month. Let's say their wages double to $260 a month. At an average minimum wage (which you can't live on in most parts of the U.S.) a U.S. worker makes about $1440 a month. In addition, employers must pay social security and Medicare for the employee adding about another $86. So even if the employer doesn't provide health care or any other benefits we're talking about 6x the wages even if the wages of Chinese workers are doubled.



    And even if Chinese costs increase beyond that, manufacturing would simply move to India, Vietnam or Africa.
  • Reply 31 of 31
    macrulezmacrulez Posts: 2,455member
    deleted
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