Investigation into Siri reveals how the iPhone 4S service talks to Apple

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  • Reply 21 of 31
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by djsherly View Post


    Here?s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes.



    Didn't notice thieves in your list. Nor was Assange one of the faces of the greats in Apple's famous commercial.
  • Reply 22 of 31
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,283member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jnjnjn View Post


    And it could be clipped on as a watch. It will of course take another round of miniaturizing to fit in bluetooth, WiFi, GSM and GPS, but it will be the ultimate communication device.



    It may be a lot closer than you realize. There's an Android-powered "watch" module available now that includes "a touchscreen, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity, accelerometer, magnetometer, creative alerts, and a 14-pin connector. . . ."



    http://www.androidauthority.com/andr...s-do-it-26014/
  • Reply 23 of 31
    You know they've hit upon something revolutionary when the entire world seems obsessed in how it works and how they can circumvent the technology behind it.
  • Reply 24 of 31
    djsherlydjsherly Posts: 1,016member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post


    Didn't notice thieves in your list. Nor was Assange one of the faces of the greats in Apple's famous commercial.



    Blue box? How do you think apples founders made their start in life? And I don't know why you're bringing Assange into this?
  • Reply 25 of 31
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by djsherly View Post


    Blue box? How do you think apples founders made their start in life? And I don't know why you're bringing Assange into this?



    Ha. The free long distance gizmos. Good point. And now Apple is way bigger than those telephone companies back then.
  • Reply 26 of 31
    eehdeehd Posts: 137member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Nobodyy View Post


    Why can't I be curious on how Siri does work? As an avid programmer, I love to just expand my knowledge of technology and I especially love to see how Apple's technology for iOS works, including Siri; there's no harm in knowing.

    .



    Because you're supposed to be a blind sheep and just accept things for what they are, er, for what you're told.
  • Reply 27 of 31
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,283member
    Another developer has figured out how to port Siri to any device, fooling it into thinking it's communicated thru Apple servers when instead it's a proxy. Good stuff.



    http://9to5mac.com/2011/11/21/develo...vice-via-siri/
  • Reply 28 of 31
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


    Another developer has figured out how to port Siri to any device, fooling it into thinking it's communicated thru Apple servers when instead it's a proxy. Good stuff.



    http://9to5mac.com/2011/11/21/develo...vice-via-siri/



    You really think Siri being accessible to a billion or more possible devices is a good thing a month after its launch as a Beta? At best, we have Apple putting more checks into Siri on the server and a more elaborate handshake that will slow down its ability to communicate to the user.



    You really want the entire system to less functional? That just makes you sound like an anti-Apple fanatic that wants to see Apple fail. Why not instead hope for other companies to build their own version of Siri that will push Apple and this technology ahead the way the iPhone has revamped the smartphone industry in just a few years?
  • Reply 29 of 31
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,283member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    You really think Siri being accessible to a billion or more possible devices is a good thing a month after its launch as a Beta? At best, we have Apple putting more checks into Siri on the server and a more elaborate handshake that will slow down its ability to communicate to the user.



    You really want the entire system to less functional? That just makes you sound like an anti-Apple fanatic that wants to see Apple fail. Why not instead hope for other companies to build their own version of Siri that will push Apple and this technology ahead the way the iPhone has revamped the smartphone industry in just a few years?



    By "good stuff" I meant the article and explanation of how he did it. You're absolutely correct that from Apple's viewpoint it's definitely not a good thing, and depending on how Apple tweaks authentication it could impact legitimate users too.



    As far as other companies working on voice control, I thought I read that Amazon, like Apple, recently made a similar tech purchase and Google was already rumored months ago to be finalizing their extended voice-search service, expected in the spring/2012.
  • Reply 30 of 31
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


    As far as other companies working on voice control, I thought I read that Amazon, like Apple, recently made a similar tech purchase and Google was already rumored months ago to be finalizing their extended voice-search service, expected in the spring/2012.



    A couple things to consider? Siri was founded in 2007 and Apple bought Siri in 2010. On top of that, the foundations of Siri come from a long history of AI development.
    With Siri, Apple is using the results of over 40 years of research funded by DARPA via SRI International?s Artificial Intelligence Center through the Personalized Assistant that Learns Program and Cognitive Agent that Learns and Organizes Program CALO.



    This includes the combined work from research teams from Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Massachusetts, the University of Rochester, the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition, Oregon State University, the University of Southern California, and Stanford University. This technology has come a long way with dialog and natural language understanding, machine learning, evidential and probabilistic reasoning, ontology and knowledge representation, planning, reasoning and service delegation
    It's easier to just quote the Wiki paragraph but there is a footnote link to a more indepth source for those that wish to delve deeper.



    I can't find much about Yap so I assume it doesn't have the same pedigree as Siri and potentially is much more rudimentary in nature.
    What Google has is a lot of data mining, but I don't know if they have yet been able to build out the natural language support. As usual, the competition is usually 5 years behind Apple, though I'm sure you'll disagree with that.
  • Reply 31 of 31
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,283member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    . . .What Google has is a lot of data mining, but I don't know if they have yet been able to build out the natural language support. As usual, the competition is usually 5 years behind Apple, though I'm sure you'll disagree with that.



    No, not necessarily disagreeing with the basic premise that Apple is an innovation leader. They certainly are. In the case of Google's upcoming natural voice search, I'd imagine it's homegrown rather than purchased (Siri/Yap), same as their current voice search and translation services. Google's been using voice search (and control for that matter) for some time, since at least 2008. In fact some of the features were pinned in the old Google 411 service back in early 2007, in part used for gathering voice samples for their upcoming voice control in 2008. So Google obviously had voice search plans underway prior to Siri entering the picture in 2007.
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