UK's chief rabbi meant no criticism of Steve Jobs, uses an iPad & iPhone daily

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 52
    I would like to thank the Rabbi for making these couple of threads on Appleinsider some of the best in recent times. Funny, enlightening, and surprisingly quite uniting in spirit and opinion.
  • Reply 22 of 52
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post


    And god said to Moses:



    Thou shall not use a false tablet and thou shall not become a Fandroid.



    That explains why the rabbi uses the real deal.



    +1 Funny.
  • Reply 23 of 52
    Hahaha... I would love to have seen Lord Sacks' inbox this morning...
  • Reply 24 of 52
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sternapples53 View Post


    The problem is the rabbi got it right. The iPad, iPhone are just entertainment vending machines.



    And, unless you're an ultra-fundamentalist cleric of some ultra-fundamentalist religious order, the trouble with 'entertainment' is.......?
  • Reply 25 of 52
    [Deleted]
  • Reply 26 of 52
    His bicycle must have the steering on the rear to do that kind of back pedaling.
  • Reply 27 of 52
    I can't believe the comments that I'm reading. It is true that the generation that is growing up with all these amusement products are easily distracted from the things that really matter in life. Of course there is nothing wrong with an iPad or iPhone. But like with everything; when things are not seen in the right context they can become harmful. I see an upcoming generation that is hungry for amusement. They lack discipline and true commitment to fulfill the dreams they once had as a child growing up. Unless they learn how to use these tools to their enhancement rather than their demise they will fall a prey to these technologies.



    I think some of you can't flex your brain to understand what he meant and just want to believe what you want to believe so you can make fun of people.



    Have some dignity and respond like an adult should. Unless, of course, you are of the generation I was formerly speaking of. Then you have just confirmed my general experience. Then again, the coming generation has learned to be like that from somebody, you? Shallow remarks and conclusions are not rare from shallow people.



    BTW I don't know this rabbi. I'm in now way affiliated to him (I'm Dutch) or the Jewish faith. I can, however, relate to what he is saying
  • Reply 28 of 52
    OK, I'm confused. Based on the good rabbi's latest statement, can the people not sitting in the cheap seats still continue to rattle their jewelry or not?
  • Reply 29 of 52
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacShack View Post


    I can't believe the comments that I'm reading. It is true that the generation that is growing up with all these amusement products are easily distracted from the things that really matter in life. Of course there is nothing wrong with an iPad or iPhone. But like with everything; when things are not seen in the right context they can become harmful. I see an upcoming generation that is hungry for amusement. They lack discipline and true commitment to fulfill the dreams they once had as a child growing up. Unless they learn how to use these tools to their enhancement rather than their demise they will fall a prey to these technologies.



    I think some of you can't flex your brain to understand what he meant and just want to believe what you want to believe so you can make fun of people.



    Have some dignity and respond like an adult should. Unless, of course, you are of the generation I was formerly speaking of. Then you have just confirmed my general experience. Then again, the coming generation has learned to be like that from somebody, you? Shallow remarks and conclusions are not rare from shallow people.



    I think you're being entirely to overly analytical of the replies. I seriously doubt anyone here thinks that this rabbi's sentiments are that far off-base, but when you aim your shotgun blast of religious furvor at one particular manufacturer's products, it does smack of a narrow minded attack. Granted, it was probably all for his own publicity, but still...



    I'm sure people in the 1500s thought that all the newly printed books would lead to an unfocused generation, but it didn't. I'm sure that in the 1800s, people thought that the steam engine would

    lead to a degeneration of the ethics of the next generation, but it didn't. I'm sure that the 1900s, people thought the telephone would lead to a lowering of the standards of living of the population, but it hasn't.



    The fact of the matter is that today's modern conveniences can be attacked as "leading to distraction from the things that matter in life", but what if the iPad leads to innovations that end hunger or cure diseases? What if the social networks that the iPhone create lowers crime rates? The simple fact is that we don't know what today's 'conveniences' will lead society into in the future.
  • Reply 30 of 52
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by F1Ferrari View Post


    I think you're being entirely to overly analytical of the replies. I seriously doubt anyone here thinks that this rabbi's sentiments are that far off-base, but when you aim your shotgun blast of religious furvor at one particular manufacturer's products, it does smack of a narrow minded attack. Granted, it was probably all for his own publicity, but still...



    I'm sure people in the 1500s thought that all the newly printed books would lead to an unfocused generation, but it didn't. I'm sure that in the 1800s, people thought that the steam engine would

    lead to a degeneration of the ethics of the next generation, but it didn't. I'm sure that the 1900s, people thought the telephone would lead to a lowering of the standards of living of the population, but it hasn't.



    The fact of the matter is that today's modern conveniences can be attacked as "leading to distraction from the things that matter in life", but what if the iPad leads to innovations that end hunger or cure diseases? What if the social networks that the iPhone create lowers crime rates? The simple fact is that we don't know what today's 'conveniences' will lead society into in the future.



    I perceive the meaning of your point. I would however not put books in the same line with movies and video games. They are of a total different kind. Also books aren't as addictive as movies or video games. If people do happen to be addicted to reading they seem to be more of the more developed type than the impulsive short-term thinking type. Concentration levels are very low these days and where books have to fight their way into children's hands the children drop them for video games and movies.



    As a parent I think that I have to teach my children how to use these tools to their advancement by showing the pro's of such a device but also by showing the possible con's. The same as I will be teaching them the con's of just reading books or the con's of just being out their in the field without any solid reading or knowledge. There is hardly a danger for kids getting addicted to books. Their is however some merit in thinking that movies and video games can be addictive.
  • Reply 31 of 52
    vspvsp Posts: 32member
    Dang, he got his target wrong. In fact he should know who is the king of advertisement: Google. Google sponsors the freetard society which is greedy and irritably irresponsible. This group of people thinks that they can get free lunches for no effort. They think that others should work and give away the fruits of their labor to them for free. This group of people are also overtly idealistic and quixotically utopian. They seems to believe that the world populated with bleeding hearts and starry-eyed individuals will solve all mankind's problems. They take their religion of "free" to ridiculous height and inveigh successful people for being responsible for their deficiency and inadequacy. I can equate such people as grasshoppers who do not work but play in summer and die in winter, as against the ants who labor the whole year long.



    The rabbi should get off his small-minded, blinkered approach and see who is the real culprit in the make-believe world of crass consumerism.
  • Reply 32 of 52
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacShack View Post


    There is hardly a danger for kids getting addicted to books. Their is however some merit in thinking that movies and video games can be addictive.



    My niece is addicted to books, and as such is probably the most anti-social 17 year-old I have ever known. She can plow through books, but can barely carry on a conversation. How is that not a problem? At some point very soon in her life personal skills will be needed, but she just doesn't have them.



    What if a child that loves movies today becomes a famous playwright or actor, and then uses that fame to help impoverished peoples around the world? What if a child playing a video game today becomes a very skilled brain surgeon later in life and credits his amazing dexterity to playing video games on his iPad when young?



    The point is that we don't know what tomorrow's future will be based on today's technology, and lumping it all into a category of 'this is good, that is bad' is very short sighted.
  • Reply 33 of 52
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacShack View Post


    I can't believe the comments that I'm reading. It is true that the generation that is growing up with all these amusement products are easily distracted from the things that really matter in life. Of course there is nothing wrong with an iPad or iPhone. But like with everything; when things are not seen in the right context they can become harmful. I see an upcoming generation that is hungry for amusement. They lack discipline and true commitment to fulfill the dreams they once had as a child growing up. Unless they learn how to use these tools to their enhancement rather than their demise they will fall a prey to these technologies.



    I think some of you can't flex your brain to understand what he meant and just want to believe what you want to believe so you can make fun of people.



    Have some dignity and respond like an adult should. Unless, of course, you are of the generation I was formerly speaking of. Then you have just confirmed my general experience. Then again, the coming generation has learned to be like that from somebody, you? Shallow remarks and conclusions are not rare from shallow people.



    BTW I don't know this rabbi. I'm in now way affiliated to him (I'm Dutch) or the Jewish faith. I can, however, relate to what he is saying



    I agree with this post.



    The problem is that young people are so addicted to these devices, that an attack on the device is interpreted as an attack on the user. Rabbi should have offered a solution instead of simply identifying the problem.



    Fact is these devices (including android) do offer a dangerous amount of distraction and take attention away from things that are more important.
  • Reply 34 of 52
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by F1Ferrari View Post


    I'm sure that in the 1800s, people thought that the steam engine would

    lead to a degeneration of the ethics of the next generation, but it didn't. I'm sure that the 1900s, people thought the telephone would lead to a lowering of the standards of living of the population, but it hasn't.



    You're sure, huh? Well that's pretty weak in my opinion.



    Can I say that it is a mark of maturity to be able to see the argument from the other person's perspective. Before you lob all your rudimentary "nuh uh" comments at people, stop and actually consider. Even if the rabbi wasn't all right, you have to see his point is at least partially right.



    One thing the i-revolution might have brought: Self-important-ism. . . nobody matters except me (or me and the people I care about).
  • Reply 35 of 52
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by F1Ferrari View Post


    My niece is addicted to books, and as such is probably the most anti-social 17 year-old I have ever known. She can plow through books, but can barely carry on a conversation. How is that not a problem? At some point very soon in her life personal skills will be needed, but she just doesn't have them.



    What if a child that loves movies today becomes a famous playwright or actor, and then uses that fame to help impoverished peoples around the world? What if a child playing a video game today becomes a very skilled brain surgeon later in life and credits his amazing dexterity to playing video games on his iPad when young?



    The point is that we don't know what tomorrow's future will be based on today's technology, and lumping it all into a category of 'this is good, that is bad' is very short sighted.



    Your making arguments just for the sake of arguing. I would answer that your niece has a better problem to deal with than 99% of adolescents. Regarding movies and games, they can watch all they want so long as they are spending the right amount of time doing schoolwork and chores. The problem is not with 1 movie a night, or 1 text a night, but 10 movies a night, and 2500 texts in a school week. The Rabbi should have been more clear.... I see this trend among kids all too often.
  • Reply 36 of 52
    tylerk36tylerk36 Posts: 1,037member
    We all do it. We judge. It's human nature. I have a problem when it is referring to me and all others who own an Apple device as if I am a selfish man. Maybe he should get to know me and how I help people daily with my own money and time. And yes my shit stinks.
  • Reply 37 of 52
    According to the article: "But the rabbi's comments were intended to be a condemnation of the users of new technology and the individualism they are seen as exhibiting, rather than placing the blame on the products themselves."



    Oh, he's blaming ME, not my iphone, iPad and MBP. I feel better now.
  • Reply 38 of 52
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 17,789member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacShack View Post


    I can't believe the comments that I'm reading. It is true that the generation that is growing up with all these amusement products are easily distracted from the things that really matter in life. Of course there is nothing wrong with an iPad or iPhone. But like with everything; when things are not seen in the right context they can become harmful. I see an upcoming generation that is hungry for amusement. They lack discipline and true commitment to fulfill the dreams they once had as a child growing up. Unless they learn how to use these tools to their enhancement rather than their demise they will fall a prey to these technologies.



    I think some of you can't flex your brain to understand what he meant and just want to believe what you want to believe so you can make fun of people.



    Have some dignity and respond like an adult should. Unless, of course, you are of the generation I was formerly speaking of. Then you have just confirmed my general experience. Then again, the coming generation has learned to be like that from somebody, you? Shallow remarks and conclusions are not rare from shallow people.



    BTW I don't know this rabbi. I'm in now way affiliated to him (I'm Dutch) or the Jewish faith. I can, however, relate to what he is saying



    I have a better idea. How about you...



    1. Get a sense of humor



    2. Stop lecturing people on what to post



    3. Stop insulting people by telling them to "flex their brains."



    4. Take your 91 posts and put them where the sun doesn't shine.





    Good day, sir. I said...GOOD DAY.
  • Reply 39 of 52
    Yet Sacks didn't balance his case by pointing out the potential dangers of religions...
  • Reply 40 of 52
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SOLSTICE1221 View Post


    In other words he's a hypocrite. Just like most religious zealots.



    Yep!!!
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