Chinese 'iPad' trademark owner looking to block sales of Apple's iPad globally

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Comments

  • Reply 121 of 205
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


    No need. Apple pays Foxconn for every unit shipped. If Foxconn can't ship any units, Apple doesn't have to pay. No need for Apple to cancel its contract.




    How do you know that? What is your evidence? Is that anything more than a guess?
  • Reply 122 of 205
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 2,351member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fuzz_ball View Post


    Normally I wouldn't resort to the childish response, but hey, it seems more than appropriate. I say that until the Chinese government takes their knock-off, piracy, IP-theft seriously, then their companies should be ignored when they make the kinds of complaints that foreign companies have been making for years about China. They can't let their homegrown companies rip everyone else off then suddenly find religion when one of their own companies feels it's IP/trademark/etc is being abused...



    Do you know that patents and copyrights are a national thing? Each country has its own patent and trademark office. My company(us) won a patent lawsuit against another US company. That company can not sell such product in US. But that company still sells the product in Japan.



    My point is the Chinese legal system has no obligation to voluntarily enforce US patents and trademarks until a US company actively tries to ask Chinese to do.



    I think many Chinese companies are employing this loophole. So it is not a corruption of Chinese legal system at all.
  • Reply 123 of 205
    tundraboytundraboy Posts: 1,844member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by xSamplex View Post


    Dear Apple,



    We will stop buying American debt and destroy your economy. Don't forget that we have you by the short curlies.



    Sincerely.



    China



    That is the emptiest threat I've heard in a long time.
  • Reply 124 of 205
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by alcstarheel View Post


    So development of these can run rampant...













    ...but when Apple outright purchases the trademark name this company can renege on that agreement and get the okay to block exports?



    Two wrongs don't make a right.



    The first situation is clearly wrong. But seemingly, under relevant law, the second situation is right.



    That's what courts are for. To decide the relevant law, and to right the wrongs. Here, the courts have decided who is right and who is wrong.
  • Reply 125 of 205
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by alcstarheel View Post


    So development of these can run rampant...













    ...but when Apple outright purchases the trademark name this company can renege on that agreement and get the okay to block exports?



    Wow, I did not know the clones were so...blatant. Down to a fake Apple logo. Can I assume the Chinese are not knocking off the Motorola RAZR MAXXXXX?
  • Reply 126 of 205
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by I am a Zither Zather Zuzz View Post


    If a company were set up making counterfeit iPads (or any other name-brand product) in the USA, all for export, do you really think that US law would allow that?



    That seems pretty unlikely to me. ISTM that manufacture of counterfeit goods can be prevented under Chinese law too, and that if they are produced, export can be stopped.



    Do you really think otherwise?



    There's a difference between counterfeit goods and a trademark dispute.



    In this case, Apple clearly has the rights to use the iPad trademark in the rest of the world. If they manufacture in China and ship outside of China, they are not infringing on the Chinese trademark.



    Manufacturing counterfeit goods is a different thing, entirely.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hellacool View Post


    You do realize that China is a Communist country and if they choose to stop the exports of ANYTHING they can and no one can do anything about it. Sure they can move manufacturing to other countries but that would take years, would not happen over night. Many here fail to understand that this case isnt "business" oriented, it is "Nationalism" oriented. Here comes the big bad American Apple trying to bully its way around (Like America does) throw money at everything and do what it wants with impunity. Even if Apple is 100% in the rights here, it is perception and "saving face" that is ruling the day on this one. If the Chinese government at all feels Apple is attempting to bully or disrespect them, they will halt shipments immediately, the old fashion "Chinese safety inspection" that lasts for years of cargo ships with Apple products on them.



    That is true. However, there are two scenarios:

    1. China chooses to follow world trade laws. In that case, Apple has the right to manufacture a product for export that does not have a valid China trademark.

    2. China choose to ignore world trade laws and block iPad exports even though world standards would not allow that. In that case, the repercussions would be immense - and Chinese government officials are not stupid. The chances that they would so blatantly violate world trade processes over one little trademark dispute are miniscule.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by I am a Zither Zather Zuzz View Post


    How do you know that? What is your evidence? Is that anything more than a guess?



    Because Apple's not stupid. Do you really think Apple has a contract with Foxconn saying that they'll pay them a billion dollars a month (or whatever it is) whether Foxconn ships anything or not? Not bloody likely.
  • Reply 127 of 205
    mhiklmhikl Posts: 471member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by parksgm

    Justify this - there is no widespread conception that the United States has a corrupt legal system. However, there IS the widespread belief that China's legal system is corrupt. Most of the commenters on the board have tacitly agreed with the underlying assumption that China has a corrupt legal system in their posts.



    By and large, there is no large scale bribery of the judicial system in the US.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post


    I meant that both countries are corrupt in the sense of being anti-democratic and being ruled by an elite group that the laws don't apply to (among other things).



    I think the onus is on you to prove that there is rampant corruption in the Chinese judicial system and that judges are regularly "bought off." Merely saying (paraphrased), "everyone here agrees with me" (about that) is not the same as proving your point. I could easily do the same.



    I mostly only wanted to point out that the original statement was (IMO of course), borderline racist and had "a tone" that was hardly different from making jokes about "darkies" or whatever. It came across as a mean spirited dig at an entire culture and race for no reason other than pure nastiness.



    I didn't *report* the post as offensive or racist as I know these things can be open to (some) interpretation, but it seemed to me like a pretty disgusting kind of remark to make.



    Perceptions can be either racist or just plain ignorant (as in uneducated or uninformed). A true racist is, of course, also uninformed. Throwing accusations of racism could in itself be argued as an act of racism.



    Better to assume that a posters comments are uninformed unless blatant racists remarks are made obvious. To educate or attempt to educate and enlighten is far more constructive than name calling.



    A racist is not going to change by the fact of his/her nature being pointed out. An uniformed person, on the other hand, more likely has the potential to learn and change.



    Just because a breakfast cereal claims that something lowers cholesterol doesn't mean the cereal either has cholesterol lowering capabilities or that it even contains the said thing. Not everybody realises this when such an advert is presented, just as not everybody realises that some widespread conception could be wrong.



    I believe Orwell called acceptable widespread conception, bellyfeel and Stephen Colbert calls it truthiness.
  • Reply 128 of 205
    nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member
    I say, don?t give in, or the extortions will keep coming! Just call it Pad in China.
  • Reply 129 of 205
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by xSamplex View Post


    Dear Apple,



    We will stop buying American debt and destroy your economy. Don't forget that we have you by the short curlies.



    Sincerely.



    China



    Apple does not have any significant debt. And more than half their profits are generated overseas.



    The Chinese have been actually selling off US Treasury notes to diversify their holdings. They still hold quite a large amount of US bonds, but China is more dependent on the US consumer buying their products than we are on the Chinese buying US bonds. The Chinese don't want to destroy the US economy - it will damage their economy more.



    Maybe when you get old enough to have some short curlies, you can learn something about economics and business.
  • Reply 130 of 205
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by xSamplex View Post


    Dear Apple,



    We will stop buying American debt and destroy your economy. Don't forget that we have you by the short curlies.



    Sincerely.



    China



    Up Yours china , and Fxxx U!
  • Reply 131 of 205
    tundraboytundraboy Posts: 1,844member
    There's a high level Chinese delegation visiting Obama today. I wonder if the lower level people on the trip (who do most of the heavy lifting when it comes to substantive talks) are getting a polite earful from their US counterparts about the wisdom of letting a two-bit trademark extortionist hold hostage a US company that is instrumental in providing hundreds of thousands of jobs in China.
  • Reply 132 of 205
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Stan_Timek View Post


    So Proview sells the rights to the name, probably thinks that it didn't negotiate for enough money the first time around and now they "refuse to honor" the agreement. China isn't becoming more capitalistic, they're becoming more like organized crime.



    You said the magic words there. China has a government on paper, but what runs the country is organized corruption ? top to bottom! Rule of Law is what you don't get when you move your production to China or Russia.



    I suspect Proview wants some extortion money. Then there's the judge and some local officials as well as a few high level officials to pay off... In pre-communist China there was the "Torture of 1000 cuts, now, there is the Torture of 1000 bribes (cuts).
  • Reply 133 of 205
    Proview says that the Apple's iPad trademark deal with Proview, Taiwan is not acceptable in China, and thus they want the Chinese government to stop export/import of iPad. However, the Chinese government claims Taiwan to be a part of China. Does anyone see a contradiction here?
  • Reply 134 of 205
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 2,351member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mhikl View Post


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by parksgm

    Justify this - there is no widespread conception that the United States has a corrupt legal system. However, there IS the widespread belief that China's legal system is corrupt. Most of the commenters on the board have tacitly agreed with the underlying assumption that China has a corrupt legal system in their posts.



    By and large, there is no large scale bribery of the judicial system in the US.







    Perceptions can be either racist or just plain ignorant (as in uneducated or uninformed). A true racist is, of course, also uninformed. Throwing accusations of racism could in itself be argued as an act of racism.



    Better to assume that a posters comments are uninformed unless blatant racists remarks are made obvious. To educate or attempt to educate and enlighten is far more constructive than name calling.



    A racist is not going to change by the fact of his/her nature being pointed out. An uniformed person, on the other hand, more likely has the potential to learn and change.



    Just because a breakfast cereal claims that something lowers cholesterol doesn't mean the cereal either has cholesterol lowering capabilities or that it even contains the said thing. Not everybody realises this when such an advert is presented, just as not everybody realises that some widespread conception could be wrong.



    I believe Orwell called acceptable widespread conception, bellyfeel and Stephen Colbert calls it truthiness.



    I have explained to you why you are wrong.
  • Reply 135 of 205
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by xSamplex View Post


    Dear Apple,



    We will stop buying American debt and destroy your economy. Don't forget that we have you by the short curlies.



    Sincerely.



    China



    sad, but glad apple is getting a taste of its own medicine.
  • Reply 136 of 205
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,467member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


    That is true. However, there are two scenarios:

    1. China chooses to follow world trade laws. In that case, Apple has the right to manufacture a product for export that does not have a valid China trademark.

    2. China choose to ignore world trade laws and block iPad exports even though world standards would not allow that. In that case, the repercussions would be immense - and Chinese government officials are not stupid. The chances that they would so blatantly violate world trade processes over one little trademark dispute are miniscule.



    You write those claims as tho there's no question of them being unequivocally true.



    IMHO the Chinese could consider those iPads as being manufactured/owned by Foxconn (or whoever) and being sold to Apple under contract and on upon completion, which includes packaging I believe. In which case it's conceivable that the product would be considered sold to Apple rather than being manufactured by Apple. If so, then Foxconn might not be permitted to sell/export them.



    Just a thought.
  • Reply 137 of 205
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


    You write those claims as tho there's no question of them being unequivocally true.



    IMHO the Chinese could consider those iPads as being manufactured/owned by Foxconn (or whoever) and being sold to Apple under contract and on upon completion, which includes packaging I believe. In which case it's conceivable that the product would be considered sold to Apple rather than being manufactured by Apple. If so, then Foxconn might not be permitted to sell/export them.



    Just a thought.





    Doesn't Apple own the parts already? Either way, the Chinese company and the government are completely in left field on this one so there is no telling what they may do.
  • Reply 138 of 205
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by screamingfist View Post


    sad, but glad apple is getting a taste of its own medicine.



    Yes, after decades of having their designs stolen and their stuff illegally cloned with absolutely no recourse, it's good to see Apple getting sued over a technicality.



  • Reply 139 of 205
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


    No need. Apple pays Foxconn for every unit shipped. If Foxconn can't ship any units, Apple doesn't have to pay. No need for Apple to cancel its contract.



    Really? Can Foxconn just keep everything they make? I'm pretty sure they could make a bundle in their black market, especially given China's iPhone/iPad mania now. Apple's customer in the West would get pissed off big time though.
  • Reply 140 of 205
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lamewing View Post


    Nonsense. China owns no more than 8-9 percent of American debt.





    I think that's 8-9 percent of public debt (i,e US treasuries, Mae bonds), plus another trillion in US private/corporate securities/debt. Let's not also forget their 3-trillion dollars FX holding.



    That being said, I don't think Proview's lawsuit is going to start a trade/currency war with China. I think Walmart is still the largest importer of Made-In-China goods in US (automobiles from Japan, Germany being the US's #1 import)
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