Microsoft raises tablet virtualization licenses to stave off iPad threat

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 80
    rkevwillrkevwill Posts: 224member


    I smell another Lawsuit coming. It's pretty clear this is going to raise some monopoly/anti competition flags. However.....Apple these days may want to show they can get along just fine without Microsoft. Only problem with that thinking, is I am sure, this is going to be a big fly in the ointment for our company to roll out Citrix access for iPads. We are currently in beta testing to access our work computers from iPads. Androids and future Windows devices at present, are not even being considered. In the distant past, Apple hasn't much cared about enterprise, but just when they started to break into that market.........


     


    Now if our company, with 30,000 to 40,000 remote users, decides they can't use iPads because of this move, that sounds like a lawyer's dream evidence example.

  • Reply 22 of 80
    rkevwillrkevwill Posts: 224member


    Frankly, the Office issue is minor to eliminating the ability to access office's computers with Citrix or some other VPN type service.

  • Reply 23 of 80
    dgnr8dgnr8 Posts: 196member


     


    This will be a problem for MS, additional tax for the privilege to use an OS that is not geared for corporate environments.


     


    Every company I work with has zero plans to migrate from 7.


     


    They now have there desktops now fully functional with 7 and users finally trained.


     


    There is no huge benefit for a company to spend the license fees and the training expense for the new OS they do not want, AGAIN!!!!!, in such a short period.


     


    I have been beta testing the 8 and I can tell you right now this is not going to work in corporate unless they turn off tiles.


     


    I see a terrible adoption rate for this version.


     


    Windows 9 will fix Windows 8 like Windows 7 fixed Windows Vista.


     


    I am not a Windows basher at all, I actually like Windows 7.


     


    It is a most stable version of Windows since Windows 2000.


     


    However Windows 8 is the biggest mistake MS has made since Windows ME.


     


    They are trying to compete with Apple and Android to go after consumer market, tisk tisk … Big Mistake.


     


    I won't even go into there numerous mistakes they have made in virtualization and the way they have tried to punish enviros using Citrix or VMWare

  • Reply 24 of 80
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,385member


    Sounds like yet another reason to dump Microsoft.

  • Reply 25 of 80


    I agree with eksodos; it's just another reason to stay on Windows 7.  + To me it sounds a lot like 'third line forcing' which is illegal in Australia.


     


    PS - Slightly off topic: I haven't seen Windows 8 yet but I can't imagine why compaines would want to upgarde in any hurry and risk another Vista. Win7 seems stable enough. Maybe it can last 10 years. :)

  • Reply 26 of 80
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 3,212member


    This is what's called "abuse of monopoly power."

  • Reply 27 of 80


    And because Eric Holder is too busy breaking Obama's promise to not prosecute those producing medical marijuana legally under state laws - just shut down the whole industry in Montana for example, trying to do the same in Colorado. So yeah, they are too busy fighting a "drug war" that nobody wants any more to stop companies from screwing us over.


     

  • Reply 28 of 80
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,388member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DGNR8 View Post

    Every company I work with has zero plans to migrate from 7.


    I have been beta testing the 8 and I can tell you right now this is not going to work in corporate unless they turn off tiles.


    Windows 9 will fix Windows 8 like Windows 7 fixed Windows Vista.


    However Windows 8 is the biggest mistake MS has made since Windows ME.



     


    I seem to recall Ballmer saying that Windows 8 could be their last version of Windows if people don't take to it.


     


    And from what I've read about people's reactions to Windows 8 so far… well… they do make money on other things, after all.


     


    Personally, I find it a little saddening. Here's Microsoft, actually designing their own GUI for once in their existence, and it's GOOD. It's actually good. They can create their own stuff! I think it's glorious that they're departing from their old style with Windows 8. The problem is that in terms of usability and user-friendliness, it's basically in pre-art-pre-production-pre-alpha stage.


     


    They have something gorgeous here and they have some great ideas, but it's not in a usable form yet. People won't want to use what they have available right now. Unless drastic improvements are made to how it's used and the ease with which it's used…


     


    …people WILL leave. 


     


    I'm not talking 'leave' like the doom and gloom nonsense we all either heard or spouted ourselves about Vista. Vista was just prettying. Vista was to XP what Mac OS 10.0 was to 9.2 (In terms of UI, not… not underpinnings). Vista was buggy, sure. Vista was confusing, sure. It moved settings around and looked entirely different. But so did OS X. 


     


    People got over Vista because, more than anything else, it was simply a change of appearance. Nothing more. Windows 7 proved that this change was good, as people flock to 7. 7 worked out the kinks behind the scenes from Vista, and made it into something trustworthy and usable. People often say that "Vista was just an alpha of 7; it shouldn't have been released". Well, OS X didn't really get usable until 10.2, now did it?


     


    But Windows 8 does something radically different. The type of change put forth by Windows 8 is closer to 'Altair to Apple ][" and "Apple ][ to Macintosh" territory than it is to "let's take what we have and make the GUI prettier" territory. Microsoft sees that the future is touch (because Apple showed them), and they're doing the RIGHT thing by moving toward that.


     


    But they're doing it wrong, and people aren't going to accept it as it is. Not at all.

  • Reply 29 of 80
    dgnr8dgnr8 Posts: 196member


    I don't know what you are using, but the latest release from technet is terrible UI for a desktop enviro.


     


    I can see if you are talking tablet.


     


    But "Martha" sitting over in accounting with a generic Dell PC, no way is Windows 8 with tiles usable.


     


    Besides comparing a new desktop enviro like Vista to XP and OS X to OS9 is not anywhere even close to touch screen tiles that is the mistake of Windows 8 for a desktop with a keyboard and mouse.


     


    IOS and OS X are not the same interfaces because they are not the same type of user input.


     


    I think the point you made of "something gorgeous" is great if you want to push consumer not corporate and that was my point.


     


    Remember MS allowed you to "Upgrade to a my familiar operating system (I know that was a Apple thing but it was true)" a year after vista was released?


     


    Corporations like GE, Exxon, Walmart and the like will once again dictate to MS to fix this problem or they will completely pass and upgrade cycle like they did before.

  • Reply 30 of 80


    Stay classy, Microsoft. Keep fighting the consumerization of IT. Never give up hope that someday, if you wish hard enough, it will be 1997 again.

  • Reply 31 of 80
    chudqchudq Posts: 43member


    Microsoft may push business to move over to iMac with no space for Windows.

  • Reply 32 of 80
    mac_dogmac_dog Posts: 1,072member


    currently reading steve jobs bio.


     


    what a great opportunity for apple to innovate. they're at their best when backed into a corner. hopefully, that innovative spirit is still alive at apple.

  • Reply 33 of 80
    nikon133nikon133 Posts: 2,600member


     


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Sandman619 View Post





    Once again, there's that microsoft tax you pay for buying any microsoft products. Since they can't compete on product, then they are going to make money from competitors products. What a shame…

    Cheers !


     


    Looks more like MS tax for people NOT buying MS products...

  • Reply 34 of 80
    nikon133nikon133 Posts: 2,600member


     


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by FreeRange View Post


    Here we go again. MSFT using their market dominance to try to crush competition. Up to their old, anti-competitive tricks. We'll give it to you for free, but for someone else's OS we are going to charge you out your butt! When you can't compete on your own merits, fk the other guy.



     


    Well it is not necessarily free from MS. It might be included in Win 8 price. At least it will be available to non-Windows users. If I'd like to use, say, iMovie on my PC, I wouldn't even have an option to purchase it.

  • Reply 35 of 80
    wovelwovel Posts: 956member


     


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by chelgrian View Post


     


     


    This isn't about RDPing into your desktop PC. The license is for accessing entirely additional copy of Windows running on a server somewhere. Or single applications running on a server displaying on a tablet (I refuse to use this stupid 'Virtual Desktop Infrastructure' and 'Virtual App' or 'App Streaming' terminology). It also seems to cover this 'Windows To Go' thing which is simply yet another copy of Windows locked down with whatever your corporate IT department want to lock down and booted off a USB key. What they are saying is that if you buy a Windows RT tablet you get rights to do this anyway, if you have an iPad you have to buy one 'Companion Device License' for each user and each user can have 4 devices.


     


    If course the cheap way to do this is to not drink the 'Virtual Desktop' KoolAid and provide a VPN + Firewall mechanism which allows the user to connect to their PC and only their PC via one of the many RDP clients available.



     


    Ok Some of those are silly, but there is nothing wrong with VDI as a term.  

  • Reply 36 of 80
    bigpicsbigpics Posts: 1,397member


     


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Relic View Post



    Never seen a company that allows personal devices on their network maybe the sales department.


     


    Hey, "BYOD"  [Bring your own Device] is all the rage I hear (and read). There's a reason why iDevices have Exchange hooks...  ...IT is being dragged (kicking and screaming or otherwise) into users devices coming into the workplace.  If you've got an MBP, are you going to willingly put it away all day to work on a $400 Dell?  Etc.


     


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Sandman619 View Post





    Once again, there's that microsoft tax you pay for buying any microsoft products. Since they can't compete on product, then they are going to make money from competitors products. What a shame…

    Cheers !


     


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    Proof that MS is threatened by the rate of iPad adoption. Once again, they are too late to the party.



     


    I have a different take because of what AI left out of the article.  I think MS can read the iPad market share tea leaves for the next few years, and want to make a few bucks.  Office for iPad is coming... ...One Note is here. And Office for Mac is a nice profit center in Redmond - and only becoming moreso since the totally proprietary Pages and Numbers just aren't cutting it. Not only in terms of enterprise strength features (especially in Numbers), but who wants to take the time and deal with the file management complexity that brings in order to "export" an extra copy of every document before they can share with 90% of computer and Android users?  (PS: That said, Keynote is one great little app - beats the pants off PowerPoint - and those files are more for the presenter's use.)



    Anyway, until native Office apps come to iOS, unmentioned companies like OnLive (OnLive Desktop, specifically) are essentially free-riding on MS's dime, as all they bring to the table is access to Office - they invested not a penny in the software that people are buying their program to get access to.  So I have to stand at least partially in Mr. Softie's corner on this one.  Charging a royalty to a company whose biz model is streaming their software to users of that software is certainly their perogative.  


     

  • Reply 37 of 80
    "Stave off" iPad?!?

    lolololol

    Nothing is "staving off" iPad -- least of all a stupid W8 tablet THAT NO ONE WILL BUY!!!!
  • Reply 38 of 80
    phone-ui-guyphone-ui-guy Posts: 1,019member

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Booga View Post


     


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Relic View Post



    Never seen a company that allows personal devices on their network maybe the sales department.


     


    It's increasingly common for companies to offer a "personal" wifi network for personal devices that is outside the firewall inside the office.  Then the device can VPN in just like from home, except they do it while physically in the office.  This covers personal iPhones, iPads, and even your random MacBook Pro for casual company/meeting use.  Even then, though, it often takes the form of Citrix or a structured "dropbox" style access and isn't wide open to the corporate network.


     

     

     

    It is actually now common place for fortune 500. They call it bring your own device. One of the main things that started it was people bringing their own iPhones into the enterprise. Now many companies that provide cell service to employees require you to buy your own device and they will pay the service. So it allows them to save money on devices and to stay out of the whole mess you get into with employee owned iTunes accounts, etc on the devices. Of course they reserve the right to wipe your personal device as a result, but hey we get to use iPhones.
  • Reply 39 of 80


    All of this is designed to give the MS-centric IT guys more control and to work out non-OSX/non-iOS configurations.


     


    MS's licensing model used to charge thru the nose on a per-client basis. They are just reasserting this policy.


     


    Sounds monopolistic?


    DOJ? FTC? EU? Anyone?

  • Reply 40 of 80
    irnchrizirnchriz Posts: 1,617member


    By the time any large corp has to contend with the new pricing it will be looking at Windows 9 (or whatever) as no IT department would be evaluating a move to Windows/Server 8 anytime soon.  The only people moving to windows 8 are your average punters and the guys in the boardroom who like the new shiny shiny.  IT departments dont care about the average joes but have to deal with the eejits from the boardroom...  'Yes Sir, you dont know how to use your new ultrabook with windows 8...let me upgrade that to windows 7 for you"  lol

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