Reliable source says no chance Apple will ax Mac Pro

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 98
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,388member


    I want it black. I want it soul-sucking black. I want it coated with that material that has a refractive index of 0.045. Shine a light directly at it and you still won't see any more of it.


     


    And I want it to be a cube. Make it the perfect successor to the NeXTcube.

  • Reply 42 of 98
    bigpicsbigpics Posts: 1,397member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post



    Mac Pro petition

    Dalrymple's confidence in the continued existence of Apple's Mac workstation comes as a Facebook petition calling for Apple to inform customers about the fate of the Mac Pro has been attracting attention. As of late Wednesday, the page had garnered more than 14,000 "likes" since the page was created in early May.


    15,397 as of my "like" a few seconds ago...


     


    https://www.facebook.com/MacProsPlease

  • Reply 43 of 98
    mn3416mn3416 Posts: 13member


    I guess I can somewhat understand why Apple is so mysterious about consumer retail products, but why the secrecy about the high end products like the Mac Pro? A consistent, public upgrade cycle would probably improve sales as it would allow companies to budget properly for new Mac Pro hardware. How do I go to my boss and tell him I need to add $4000 to the budget for the new Mac Pro that just came out in the middle of the budget / calendar year? 


     


    That said, I really hope they keep the Mac Pro even though I can't justify one at this time. The iMac is fine for home use but just doesn't seem right in a editing studio, but maybe that's just me...

  • Reply 44 of 98
    gwmacgwmac Posts: 1,807member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Aldaris View Post



    Apple has never let a product go this long without an update. This is new territory.


    I remember back in the old G4 days waiting what seemed like an eternity for a new Power Mac. I can't remember which model, it might have been the first batch to include a dual core. I remember the top of the line was slower clocked compared to the mid range since it only had a single core. Anyone remember that and how many days it was between updates? There have also been a few other times when the Mac towers were very long in the tooth between updates, so this is not really a first, though it probably is the longest between a refresh. 


     


    I think one big reason Apple will not axe the Macpro is because so many Apple employees probably rely on the Macpro for OS X, iOS, and Mac software development and coding. At least that is what I heard from a friend who works for Apple. I mean, given the choice wouldn't most people prefer a souped out 12 core Mac Pro and a couple of gorgeous 27" or 30" Apple displays as their primary workstation at your job over an iMac? Apple also realizes all these cool iOS apps, mac software, not to mention professional video, graphic artists, scientists, musicians, and other pro users need a pro machine. 

  • Reply 45 of 98
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,388member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mn3416 View Post

    I guess I can somewhat understand why Apple is so mysterious about consumer retail products, but why the secrecy about the high end products like the Mac Pro? 


     


    So the Osborne Effect doesn't apply to 'really expensive stuff'?


     


    Quote:


    A consistent, public upgrade cycle would probably improve sales as it would allow companies to budget properly for new Mac Pro hardware.



     


    So ask Intel to release chips in a timely manner instead of this pussyfooting around they keep doing. image

  • Reply 46 of 98
    vandilvandil Posts: 187member


    The Mac Pro has taken a backseat only because the iMac, laptop and iOS products are selling like hotcakes.  I'm sure the Mac Pro will be updated eventually.

  • Reply 47 of 98
    straskstrask Posts: 107member


    If this is true, it shows that Apple has recognized that a commitment to pro users, like myself, is an important part of it's brand identity.  A different kind of halo.  Especially so when you consider the rumored by out of Redmatica.  I do hope they bring Andrea to Cupertino.  Or at least have her work for the company. 

  • Reply 48 of 98
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Kludge View Post



    People seem to think Pro users will just sit around waiting for Apple to release new hardware but that's not true. I got mad at Apple and instead of staying in the cult I built a Hackintosh. I would urge others to do the same. When Apple sees they can no longer treat their business customers so direspectfully maybe they'll start giving out rough release dates. Until then I refuse to buy Apple.


    Please do tell which motherboard we should use to build a dual xeon 16 core Hackintosh. One which actually runs as stable and reliably as a real Mac. Oh, and one that actually has functioning audio too. Seriously, I want to know if it can be done. I might consider it, if it can be proven to work. So far all I've seen is single cpu builds with many problems reported.


     


    I doubt many other "Pros" would be so adventurous to try it so I doubt Apple will take notice of a few tinkerers. Most pros want to buy something with support and a guarantee. 

  • Reply 49 of 98
    straskstrask Posts: 107member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post



    Ax no,totally redesign it yes


    I do wonder if the enormous, back breaking tower that doesn't fir in a rack is a design that makes sense anymore.  I would think that a potential redesign would be a series of modular single, double and triple rack space units, mountable or stackable, that can be linked to a common power supply and connected by a thunderbolt cable which can be added on to affordably would be the way to go..  

  • Reply 50 of 98
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    boredumb wrote: »
    I thought that too, at first, but then, I wonder if these aren't all current run-times, but in a couple cases, the ones you mentioned, were 'historical' (i.e., times before, not since, current versions)?

    I'm confused as to why comment seems so convoluted. The OP I responded to clearly stated "has never" not "currently."
  • Reply 51 of 98
    afrodriafrodri Posts: 190member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     


    So the Osborne Effect doesn't apply to 'really expensive stuff'?


     



    Sometimes. Companies and large institutions often want long-term road maps so they can plan future purchases. If a product doesn't have a clear road map they may stay away, even if it offers a better short-term solution.

  • Reply 52 of 98
    boredumbboredumb Posts: 1,418member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post



    I'm confused as to why comment seems so convoluted. The OP I responded to clearly stated "has never" not "currently."


    Not convoluted, but the initial impulse for some of us was probably to start counting back from recent acquisitions (like my Air) or dates we well remembered (like latest iPhone)...


    And some of us never got past that.

  • Reply 53 of 98
    emig647emig647 Posts: 2,455member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by charlituna View Post


    All these pro users that say they have been around for ages should know that Apple isn't going to give them that kind of hint. If you need the computer now, buy it now. If you don't then wait until you do. 


     


    But asking Apple to tell you something so you feel better or know to wait is asking for something even consumers ask for and neither group has ever gotten and even under Tim Cook aren't likely to



    I completely agree. 


     


    I'm on a 12 core 2.66 westmere right now, it's MORE than enough for even our most die hard modelers here. It's not like this machine is a slouch.

  • Reply 54 of 98
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by strask View Post


    I do wonder if the enormous, back breaking tower that doesn't fir in a rack is a design that makes sense anymore.  I would think that a potential redesign would be a series of modular single, double and triple rack space units, mountable or stackable, that can be linked to a common power supply and connected by a thunderbolt cable which can be added on to affordably would be the way to go..  



    I like the Mac Pro just the way it is (desktop). If they made it rack mountable as well, as an option, that would be fine. While they were at it they should give it redundant power supplies if they want it to be a server. What you are describing is sort of a blade chassis which is too awkward as a desktop solution so, no, that is not the direction they should go in my opinion.


     


    When you talk about high density computing, that is synonymous with hot, loud, and increased power requirements, more than is typically found in a office or home wall outlet. For example all blade solutions are 220-240 VAC which is not common in the US as a regular circuit. I like the quiet, cool Mac Pro I have now.

  • Reply 55 of 98
    sockrolidsockrolid Posts: 2,789member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post



    After a few seconds of silence, Benjamin followed up by asking "You're really confident in that? You feel good about that?"


     


    That's the problem I have with Benjamin.  Love him like a brother, but there was too much dead air after Gruber said anything profound or technical.  It's like Benjamin couldn't keep up mentally.  So I'm kind of glad Gruber moved the Talk Show to a different network.  Benjamin has many other successful podcasts on 5by5, so it's not a disaster for him.

  • Reply 56 of 98
    messiahmessiah Posts: 1,689member


    When I buy a Mac Pro, how far it is into its life cycle doesn't really bother me - I just want a machine that is absolutely rock solid and proven.


     


    I've done the whole latest generation/early adopter thing, and it was just a massive ball ache.


     


    At this point I'd rather have a 2.5 year old Mac Pro, than a next generation whatever.

  • Reply 57 of 98
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    Why is it that people like you, that is people with less than ten posts, find the time to write such crap? You have no credibility here and you make yourself look like a self absorbed idiot, that thinks his self importance gives him the authority to demand insider information from Apple. Sorry fella you aren't that important to anybody and nobody will follow your example because you said so.
    kludge wrote: »
    People seem to think Pro users will just sit around waiting for Apple to release new hardware but that's not true. I got mad at Apple and instead of staying in the cult I built a Hackintosh. I would urge others to do the same. When Apple sees they can no longer treat their business customers so direspectfully maybe they'll start giving out rough release dates. Until then I refuse to buy Apple.
  • Reply 58 of 98
    patranuspatranus Posts: 366member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by shompa View Post


    What is Apple's problem?


    During the honeymoon between Intel and Apple, Apple release Mac Pros with Xeon's not released officially.


    Then Intel/Apple had a fallout over that Intel didn't license the CPU interconnect to Nvidia, so Nvidia was forced stop making motherboards. 


    Apple started to talk to AMD. 




    During the Intel/Apple exclusive agreement, Intel engineers designed Apples motherboards. I don't know how its today. 


    But if Intel still designs Apples motherboards: Making a bumped Mac Pro takes minimal effort. Drivers for Thunderbolt + drivers for a good graphic card. That should not take to long time.


     


    The rumor is that Apple is redesigning the MacPro to a smaller case. The case haven't been updated in 7 years. I really don't care. The current design/case is amongst the greatest in the business. My MacPro is 100% silent during max load.




    Since Apple decided to stop support 32bit EFI in 10.8, I will have to upgrade my Mac Pro. 


    That Apple is insane/greedy for removing support for 32bit EFI is another issue. An 8 core computer, with AMD 5 series graphics card is not supported by 10.8. 



     


     


    Apple decided to use ARM instead of ATOM in their consumer products.


    Intel decided to use their collaboration with Apple on the MacBook Air to launch an initiative that would be a direct competitor.

  • Reply 59 of 98
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    .........

    $2499 wouldn't be such highway robbery for the base MP if it bought a six or eight core machine instead of a quad that is outperformed by iMacs, Macbooks, and PCs that are half the price or less.

    This nonsense is often raised by people but for users that really need a Mac Pro it is a joke! The Mac Pro has never been about single threaded performance or even really a competitor to the general desktop machine. It is a workstation computer with all of the benefits that goes with such machines.
  • Reply 60 of 98
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    One reason I'm so dismissive of posts like Kludge's is that it is hard for me to imagine a professional going the hackintosh route. It would be a huge distraction for somebody that makes money with their Mac. Building a Hackintosh for fun though is an entirely different matter.

    It is sort of like building Linux machines for professional usage. You need a rational and and technically justifiable reason to do so. Rolling your own hardware for Linux, as opposed to a Mac OS platform, is probably a smarter move anyways due to at least some vendor support.
    mstone wrote: »
    Please do tell which motherboard we should use to build a dual xeon 16 core Hackintosh. One which actually runs as stable and reliably as a real Mac. Oh, and one that actually has functioning audio too. Seriously, I want to know if it can be done. I might consider it, if it can be proven to work. So far all I've seen is single cpu builds with many problems reported.

    I doubt many other "Pros" would be so adventurous to try it so I doubt Apple will take notice of a few tinkerers. Most pros want to buy something with support and a guarantee. 
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