Samsung Galaxy S III uses identical Sony-made camera seen in iPhone 4S

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
It was revealed during a teardown by iFixit in conjunction with chip analysts ChipWorks that Samsung is sourcing a newer version of the same Sony imaging sensor used in the iPhone 4S for the South Korean company's new Galaxy S III smartphone.

ChipWorks confirmed on Friday that the backside-illuminated sensor found in Samsung's new Galaxy S III handset is being sourced from Sony and may be a newer version of the component used in Apple's iPhone 4S.

While iFixit initially claimed that the sensor is "basically the same unit" used in the iPhone 4S, further examination of the chip revealed that it could be a slightly refreshed product. It seems that the camera's sensor is where the similarities between the two devices end, however, as Samsung uses its own memory and optics to complete the unit.

Other interesting findings include the Samsung-designed 1.4 GHz quad-core Exynos package-on-package ARM processor which is built on the same 32nm process as Apple's A5 rev. 2 chip seen in the newest iPad 2 and third-generation Apple TV. Although Apple design the internals of its A-series processors, Samsung takes care of the fabrication at its foundries, one of which is located in Texas.

Galaxy Camera
Sony sensor (left) and assembled camera unit (right) in Samsung's new Galaxy S III smartphone. | Source: ChipWorks and iFixit


From the teardown:
  • Samsung Exynos 4412 quad-core A9 processor with 1GB LP DDR2 Green Memory (K3PE7E700M-XGC2)
  • Murata M2322007 WiFi Module

  • Samsung KMVTU000LM eMMC(16GB)+MDDR(64MB) NAND Flash

  • Intel Wireless PMB9811X Gold Baseband processor

  • MAX77693 and MAX77686

  • Broadcom BCM47511 Integrated Monolithic GNSS Receiver

  • Wolfson Microelectronics WM1811 stereo codec

  • Skyworks SKY77604 Multi-Band Power amplifier

  • Silicon Image 9244 low-power MHL Transmitter

  • NXP PN544 NFC Chip

  • Infineon PMB5712 RF transceiver
Samsung's massive phone sports a 4.8-inch Super AMOLED display with a resolution of 1280x720 pixels covered by Corning's new Gorilla Glass 2. Powering the beast is a 3.8-volt 2100 mAh battery with an incorporated Near Field Communications (NFC) module used in the company's "S Beam" service. For reference, Apple's 13" MacBook Pro sports a resolution of 1280x800 pixels and the iPhone 4S uses a 1420 mAh battery.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 45
    Aside from its multiple iPhone rip-offs (could they have copied Siri and more closely?) the S III is looking like a rather nice handset. I'll hold off to see what the 6th gen iPhone offers, but Samsung is making some great tech these days. Just wish they'd rely less on Apple for their ideas.
  • Reply 2 of 45
    dagamer34dagamer34 Posts: 494member
    5.8 inch?
  • Reply 3 of 45
    fredaroonyfredaroony Posts: 619member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by MeniThings View Post



    Aside from its multiple iPhone rip-offs (could they have copied Siri and more closely?) the S III is looking like a rather nice handset. I'll hold off to see what the 6th gen iPhone offers, but Samsung is making some great tech these days. Just wish they'd rely less on Apple for their ideas.


    How have they copied Siri? You mean the app made by Vlingo?


     


    How else have they ripped off the iPhone? 

  • Reply 4 of 45
    majjomajjo Posts: 574member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dagamer34 View Post



    5.8 inch?


    probably just a typo; its 4.8 inches IIRC

  • Reply 5 of 45
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,217member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by fredaroony View Post


    How have they copied Siri? You mean the app made by Vlingo?


     


    How else have they ripped off the iPhone? 



     


    first thing that caught my eye is the metal band around the phone. Apple got a lot of flack about that band the external antenna. So much so that any other company would be stupid to copy it but it seems that Samsung is that dumb. Even if it is just decorative it's a rather dumb move that makes the phone look like a flat copy of the iPhone's basic look. 


     


    That they are hyping their SVoice which basically does what Siri does etc and it's not good for Samsung. Sure they might pass on the legal notion of copying but to the public its a different game. As it was said, it would be nice if they would find their own inspiration and not out of Apple's design book. 

  • Reply 6 of 45
    fredaroonyfredaroony Posts: 619member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by charlituna View Post


     


    first thing that caught my eye is the metal band around the phone. Apple got a lot of flack about that band the external antenna. So much so that any other company would be stupid to copy it but it seems that Samsung is that dumb. Even if it is just decorative it's a rather dumb move that makes the phone look like a flat copy of the iPhone's basic look. 


     


    That they are hyping their SVoice which basically does what Siri does etc and it's not good for Samsung. Sure they might pass on the legal notion of copying but to the public its a different game. As it was said, it would be nice if they would find their own inspiration and not out of Apple's design book. 



    That is about as close as saying because it has a screen they copied the iPhone. I think you are seriously reaching on this one.


     


    You do realise that S-Voice is made by Vlingo, who has been around a lot longer than Siri, right?

  • Reply 7 of 45
    fredaroony wrote: »
    How have they copied Siri? You mean the app made by Vlingo?

    How else have they ripped off the iPhone? 

    No. It's called S Voice. Identical activation/UI as Siri. Do your research.
  • Reply 8 of 45
    fredaroonyfredaroony Posts: 619member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by MeniThings View Post





    No. It's called S Voice. Identical activation/UI as Siri. Do your research.


    Yeah and its made by Vlingo, do your own research.

  • Reply 9 of 45
    agramonteagramonte Posts: 345member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by charlituna View Post


     


    first thing that caught my eye is theq` metal band around the phone. Apple got a lot of flack about that band the external antenna. So much so that any other company would be stupid to copy it but it seems that Samsung is that dumb. Even if it is just decorative it's a rather dumb move that makes the phone look like a flat copy of the iPhone's basic look. 


     


    That they are hyping their SVoice which basically does what Siri does etc and it's not good for Samsung. Sure they might pass on the legal notion of copying but to the public its a different game. As it was said, it would be nice if they would find their own inspiration and not out of Apple's design book. 



    it is called the LG Prada, shown on Dec 2006

  • Reply 10 of 45
    agramonteagramonte Posts: 345member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by MeniThings View Post





    No. It's called S Voice. Identical activation/UI as Siri. Do your research.


    it is powered by Vlingo... and Apple did not make Siri they just bought the company and killed the BlackBerry and Android development that had already been announced.

  • Reply 11 of 45
    fredaroony wrote: »
    Yeah and its made by Vlingo, do your own research.

    You're confused. It's not an app by Vlingo. Vlingo is its own standalone app as per your original question. S Voice (yes it's powered by vlingo but that's beside the point as you're using semantic BS to backtrack on your lack of understanding) is an imbedded handset feature, and not just an app, that works exactly Siri, hence it being a rip-off. As far as other Samsung rip offs, you'd need to have a lobotomy to not know of those. Or an Android fanboy. Do your research.

    Alright I'm out of this thread. Later guys:)
  • Reply 12 of 45
    fredaroonyfredaroony Posts: 619member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by MeniThings View Post





    You're confused. It's not an app by Vlingo. Vlingo is its own standalone app as per your original question. S Voice (yes it's powered by vlingo but that's beside the point as you're using semantic BS to backtrack on your lack of understanding) is an imbedded handset feature, and not just an app, that works exactly Siri, hence it being a rip-off. As far as other Samsung rip offs, you'd need to have a lobotomy to not know of those. Or an Android fanboy. Do your research.

    Alright I'm out of this thread. Later guys:)


    lol you are still wrong...


     


    Bye bye...

  • Reply 13 of 45
    ivladivlad Posts: 742member

    "it is called the LG Prada, shown on Dec 2006"


     


    Oh god, just drop that BS already. Yes and there were picture frames before iPad and pasta was made by the Chinese not the Italians.... yes yes yes we all know. Let's move on.

     

  • Reply 14 of 45
    jack99jack99 Posts: 157member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by iVlad View Post


    "it is called the LG Prada, shown on Dec 2006"


     


    Oh god, just drop that BS already. Yes and there were picture frames before iPad and pasta was made by the Chinese not the Italians.... yes yes yes we all know. Let's move on.

     



     


    Kind of hypocritical and childish to accuse Samsung of being copycats while also asking us to "move on" when someone points fingers back at Apple, don't you think?

  • Reply 15 of 45
    I think you are seeing the mob boss side of Samsung here. They not only are copying they are flaunting it to challenge Apple. We are talking about a company whose CEO has required 2 presidential pardons to retain the legal ability to run this corporation. I use the term loosely since it seems to apply to mob owned businesses here in the US as well. These guys intend to keep copying until hell freezes over or some legal jurisdiction shuts them down. No pay off is going to be missed and no judge is going to feel safe ruling against them.

    What really is funny is how many people seem to think Samsung is the good guy in this equation. It really boggles the mind to think intelligent people see this company as a defender of open source and all that is good in tech. I know most Americans don't keep up with the news in South Korea, but these guys are straight mobsters. The only explaination I can see is that many people are willing to turn a blind eye if it means they can get less expensive tech and software.

    The really telling behavior is the anger you get directed at you if you question any of this. I think most people know what they are doing is wrong, but don't want to be reminded of it.
  • Reply 16 of 45
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,756member


    Why post about Prada fail? It will only cause Prada more pain. Prada's refined handbags are particularly sensitive. 


     


    Development of the iPhone began in 2005. We know that much. How about development of the LG Prada?


     


    http://www.wired.com/gadgets/wireless/magazine/16-02/ff_iphone


     


    Nor was iPhone development such a big secret. 


     


    http://www.fiercewireless.com/story/timeline-apple-iphone-rumors-1999-present

  • Reply 17 of 45
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,756member


    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/20/business/worldbusiness/20samsung.html


     


     


    New Bribery Allegation Roils Samsung


     


    SEOUL, South Korea, Nov. 19 — Samsung, which has vigorously denied bribery charges in a snowballing corruption scandal, sustained another blow to its image on Monday when a former legal adviser to President Roh Moo-hyun said the company had once offered him a cash bribe.


     


    The former aide, Lee Yong-chul, who also served as a presidential monitor against corruption, said that the money — 5 million won ($5,445) — was delivered to him in January 2004 as a holiday gift from a Samsung Electronics executive, but that he immediately returned it.


     


    Before sending it back, Mr. Lee said, he took pictures of the cash package, which were released to the news media on Monday.


     


    “I was outraged by Samsung’s brazenness, by its attempt to bribe a presidential aide in charge of fighting corruption,” Mr. Lee said in a written statement released at a news conference by a civic organization. He did not attend the event.


     


    James Chung, a spokesman for Samsung Electronics, said, “We are trying to find out the facts around these allegations.”


     


    Samsung Electronics is the mainstay of the 59-subsidiary Samsung conglomerate and a world leader in computer chips, flat-panel television screens and cellphones.


     


    Mr. Lee’s accusation appeared to support recent assertions by a former chief lawyer at Samsung, Kim Yong-chul, that the conglomerate had run a vast network that bribed officials, prosecutors, tax collectors, journalists and scholars on behalf of Samsung’s chairman, Lee Kun-hee.


     


    Prosecutors are investigating Mr. Kim’s accusations, and political parties have introduced legislation that would establish an independent counsel.


     


    Opposition political parties say an independent prosecutor is needed because Mr. Kim identified the president’s new chief prosecutor, Lim Chai-jin, as one of many prosecutors to have received bribes from Samsung. Mr. Lim denied the assertion.


     


    President Roh’s office dismissed the call for an independent counsel as an election-year political maneuver. The South Korean presidential election is scheduled on Dec. 19.


     


    As the scandal expanded, the chairman, Lee Kun-hee, was absent Monday from a ceremony commemorating the 20th anniversary of the death of his father, Lee Byung-chul, Samsung’s founder. Company officials cited a “serious cold and illness from fatigue.”


     


    Lee Yong-chul, the former presidential aide, now a partner at a law firm in Seoul, issued his statement and pictures through the National Movement to Unveil Illegal Activities by Samsung and Its Chairman, an organization that was started by civic groups after Mr. Kim’s allegations were made public.


     


    Calls to Mr. Lee’s office were not returned on Monday.


     


    “This is proof that Samsung’s bribery has reached not only prosecutors but the very core of political power, the Blue House,” the group said at the news conference, referring to the South Korean presidential office. President Roh’s office called that assertion “pure speculation.”


     


    Mr. Lee said the bribe he received in 2004 was delivered after an executive at Samsung Electronics asked him whether his company could send him a holiday gift. Mr. Lee said he accepted, thinking that it would be a simple gift.


     


    He said that when he returned the money with a protest, the Samsung executive apologized. The executive said he had simply allowed his company to send the gift in his name and had not known it contained cash, Mr. Lee related.


     


    The executive could not be reached for comment. Samsung said the man left the company in June 2004 and now lived in the United States.


     


    Lee Yong-chul said he decided to go public after reading about the lawyer Kim Yong-chul’s whistle-blowing. He said he believed Mr. Kim’s assertion that Samsung had run a systematic bribery effort.


     


    Samsung has denied Mr. Kim’s allegations as “groundless.” A couple of Samsung executives Mr. Kim accused of delivering bribes have sued him.


     


    In his statement, Lee Yong-chul said the cash was delivered to him while prosecutors were investigating assertions that Samsung and other conglomerates had provided large amounts of illegal campaign funds to presidential candidates during the 2002 election, which Mr. Roh won.


     


    Several campaign officials for Mr. Roh and his opponent, Lee Hoi-chang, as well as Samsung executives, were convicted of playing major roles in raising slush funds in that campaign.


     


     


     


     


    More recent:


     



     



    Bribery, Massive Corruption at Samsung, Says Exposé by Former S. Korean Prosecutor


     


    . . . In addition, a lawmaker said she had once been offered a golf bag full of cash from Samsung, and a former presidential aide said he had received and returned a cash gift from the company.


     


    Lee Kun-hee, the chairman of Samsung, was convicted of hiding more than $42 million from tax collection, and received nothing more than a suspended sentence. The media decided not to mention the whistle-blowing book at all, despite it achieving remarkable sales for a non-fiction book in that country. (Not a single newspaper published a review, and the only discussion of the book mentioned its sales--but not its title or author. Yeah, you read that right. They left out the title.) Even worse, the media refused to print any op-eds or articles explaining, let alone backing, Kim Yong-chul's side, out of fear that Samsung would pull advertisements from their TV shows and newspapers.


     


     


     



     



    South Korea makes example of Samsung corruption


     


    Samsung has been publicly forced to get its act together to stamp out corruption, with the South Korean government choosing to make an example of it. 


     


    According to a top industry consultant familiar with the company, Samsung's legal "philanderings" are no secret. While other companies are also at it, the South Korean government is keeping them safe as it looks to drive revenue and reputation to the country.


     


    The comments come as news of shadiness inside Samsung spreads, after an inspection found that elements of the company were involved in corruption. 


     


    The findings led to CEO Oh Chang-Suk stepping down and Lee Kun-Hee, chairman of the company, claiming there would be some managerial changes.


     


    However, he would not specify what the investigation had uncovered - only saying that it included taking bribes and enjoying hospitality from suppliers. He said the "worst type" of abuse was pressure on junior staff to commit corrupt acts.


     


    "Corruption and fraud" at Samsung Techwin came about accidentally, and was a result of a "complacent attitude during the past decade", he told reporters


     


    This isn't the first time Samsung has been alleged to have its hands in the till. In 2007 the company's former executives accused it of bribing police and politicians to stop probes into its management, while in 2009 the chairman, along with nine other senior executives, were indicted on tax dodging charges. 


     


    According to our analyst, speaking under condition of anonymity, these are well known facts. 


     


    "Let's be honest, Samsung's philanderings are not a secret, the company has been at it for years," he said. 


     


    -----------------------------------------------


     


     


     




    This is the sort of (criminal) organization Apple is dealing with. 


     


    Put nothing past them.
  • Reply 18 of 45
    gtrgtr Posts: 3,231member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/20/business/worldbusiness/20samsung.html


     


     


    New Bribery Allegation Roils Samsung


     



    Bribery, Massive Corruption at Samsung, Says Exposé by Former S. Korean Prosecutor


     



    South Korea makes example of Samsung corruption


     


    -----------------------------------------------


     


     


     




    This is the sort of (criminal) organization Apple is dealing with. 


     


    Put nothing past them.



     


    Samsung should print the following on the back of their phones:


     


    "Designed by Samsung in South Korea. The owner of this phone proudly supports filthy, criminal scum."


     


    (>_<)

  • Reply 19 of 45
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,362member


    Wait, I thought all the trolls were bashing Apple because of the 'pathetic' update that was the 4S? Now it's impressive that Samsung's highest end, just released, teased-to-hell-and-back flagship phone uses the exact same camera released 8 months ago in the 4S? Ok then. Go Samsung!


     


    Oh, and I'm shocked at this corruption and bribery scandal, just shocked. Oh wait, not really. 

  • Reply 20 of 45
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    quadra 610 wrote: »
    Why post about Prada fail? It will only cause Prada more pain. Prada's refined handbags are particularly sensitive. 

    Development of the iPhone began in 2005. We know that much. How about development of the LG Prada?

    http://www.wired.com/gadgets/wireless/magazine/16-02/ff_iphone

    Nor was iPhone development such a big secret. 

    http://www.fiercewireless.com/story/timeline-apple-iphone-rumors-1999-present

    Which iPhone is most similar to the LG Prada? The iPhone 4 released in 2010, I doubt it was in development back in 2005.
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