Microsoft rumored to build its own tablets to take on Apple's iPad

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  • Reply 81 of 157
    notscottnotscott Posts: 247member


    "We're really excited about this product. We call it 'Next of Kin'."

  • Reply 82 of 157

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Relic View Post


    This is great news, the more the merrier as far as I'm concerned. I really hope these things take off as there really isn't reason why they shouldn't. I happen to like the Metro interface and if Microsoft embraces more media codecs then Apple does like Divx. Flash, ect. I will defiantly pick one up to use as a media pad. We need more competition not less, with Apples latest iOS 6 release it seems that they are now becoming complacent and if Microsoft is successful we will hopefully finally get a newer, better UI for the now aging iOS to compete. Just wishing here.



    You're one of those people that like to slow down and gawk as you pass a flaming multi-car wreck, aren't you?

  • Reply 83 of 157
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    You photoshop skills are very strong young padawan, lol.

    That's not Photoshop.
  • Reply 84 of 157

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by focuspuller View Post


    This could be bad for Apple.


     


    When the Microsoft tablet fails totally and the clown Ballmer is finally removed by the Board, they may actually get somebody as CEO who has a clue.



    I hear there's a recent ex-CEO of H.P. shopping his resumé around Redmond. 

  • Reply 85 of 157


    I've never been a huge fan of MS, but in my book, they've got three things going for them in my book:


     



    1. Even though they ripped off Apple's UI and potentially caused them great loss for some time, they did push Apple to move toward a real preemptive multitasking OS.


    2. They came to Apple's aid during some dark times.  Apple may not be around today if it weren't for them, and they didn't take a pound of flesh to do it.


    3. In modern times, they built their own UI paradigm with Metro and are doing their best with it (instead of doing what Android did in 2008).


     


    I don't think Metro is going to be a great success, but I do find it hard to be mean to them after they started playing fairly and do hope that they find a profitable niche that will allow them to be around for a long time.

  • Reply 86 of 157
    asciiascii Posts: 5,936member


    Wow. Microsoft is taking a leaf from Apple's book and Google is taking a leaf from Microsoft's book. It will be interesting to see, in this age where an ecosystem is required not just an OS, whether the licensing model (Google) or the integrated model (Apple and Microsoft) will win.

  • Reply 87 of 157
    karmadavekarmadave Posts: 368member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post


    Even though the tablet might turn out to be a piece of junk, building their own hardware is a smart move by Microsoft. Apple has clearly demonstrated that building the whole widget is the best way to go.



    This is basically the same conclusion I have reached. M$ realizes that tablets are not like PC's where you can just provide the software. In order to be optimized they need to control the entire user experience. I suspect they realize this with the phone OS as well and will acquire what's left of Nokia. I predict that Windows 8, and NOT Android Tablets will become the alternative to iPad.  

  • Reply 88 of 157
    thepixeldocthepixeldoc Posts: 2,257member


    Just thought I'd chip in an opinion here as a an "all in" Apple fan and consultant.


     


    I think MS might be able to pull this off, and agree with KarmaDave and select others that:



    • a) it will be the "alternative tablet OS" to iOS rather than Android, and


    • b) Win8 on tablets just might overtake iOS.


     


    Pretty bold, but let's be honest here. There's still millions upon millions of enterprises CIOs/IT departments waiting to see what they'll be able to do when MS finally delivers something.


     


    IF Microsoft can build a tablet that:



    • a) works smooth... which by all reviews and accounts, it already does;


    • b) integrates compatible versions of Office/Exchange and Office365... which is a no-brainer really;


    • c) creates tools that allow fast deployment of business proprietary back-end software for Win8RT,


    • d) stays price competitive AND offers stellar business support....


     


    ...they're on-track to do what an analyst said they'd do be 2015. It was reported here on AI... and of course wildly scoffed at.


     


    IF Microsoft is truly honest with itself, they will realize that the consumer market is all tied up... for now at least... by Apple and Google. What neither of those competitors (include RIM here as well) have... or are going to have any time soon... is the deep reach into the backrooms of the enterprise that MS does.


     


    It took something like 10+ years before Microsoft finally had a "consumer" hit with WinXP. I don't count Win98, because it was still mostly for the Geeks & Gamers consumer... not soccer-moms, kids, or grandparents.


     


    I did the most consumer WinXP installations using SP2 even, which came out late summer 2004. Imagine that!? Almost 20 years before a real consumer got onto a computer that functioned similar to a Mac. Which I'll agree, is somewhat of a misnomer :)


     


    I'm sure MS will even open Win8 up to modding eventually... so the Metro-Tiles may be short-lived for those that really hate it.


     


    IF Microsoft sticks to there core and ".exe--cutes" this well... they'll be OK.


     


    PS. As a consultant, I have to stay up-to-date with what my customers want and need. I'm hearing all kinds of chatter and wishful-thinking from my business customers re: Win8... and I'm just doing my homework for that day when they all want Win8RT-SP2. That's how *I* stay in business.

  • Reply 89 of 157
    tribalogicaltribalogical Posts: 1,182member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by boredumb View Post


    These "tablets" will have their own tiny little hammer & chisel, instead of the traditional keypad -


    Its Microsoft's take on the "touch screen keyboard"...



    Should be called the "tap screen keyboard" to differentiate it...

  • Reply 90 of 157
    macarenamacarena Posts: 365member


    Whether or not MS builds its own tablet, I think a Windows tablet has a reasonable chance of success for following reasons:


    - MS still has a lions share of desktop OS - so any perceived compatibility or familiarity will give Windows tablets a boost out of the gate - even if there is no real similarity.


    - Android tablets are in a mess - Samsung and Motorola just cannot compete with Amazon's $199 (and soon $149) tablets - plus the innumerable tablets at even less than $100 coming from dozens of companies. The Android tablet space has gotten commoditized before it even became big.


    - Ecosystem is everything - and in Android's case, Amazon is the only one with some chance of success as an ecosystem. Google's ecosystem components (Mail, Docs, Youtube, etc) are available on all tablets, so that does not add any value to Android).


    - MS will definitely have a version of Office available for its own OS. And you can bet that they will not support Android. They may or may not support iPad - or they might support iPad later on. Office will be a killer app for Windows tablets.


    - MS is not as late to the tablet space as it was in Phones. Other than Apple, no one has managed success in tablets, so MS has a shot at being a respectable #2 if they don't mess things up. At some point, MS will release dev tools that allow compilation of existing Windows Apps for the tablet form factor.


    - MS probably will not see anywhere near the patent hassles that other Android makers are seeing.

  • Reply 91 of 157
    thepixeldocthepixeldoc Posts: 2,257member


    Just a "what-if-I-had-something-to-say-at-MS" kinda reply re: my above post:


     


    Show off a perfectly integrated business tablet FIRST... and let the Geeks, Gamers, and consumers see what they can do with the device somewhere else.


     


    Take off the consumer-oriented tiles completely, and show security, server, exchange and business-first tiles.


     


    Maybe even go with a more serious, banker-styled color palette: muted tones on gray... or real earth tones. But seriously drop the swirlies, flowers, circles, etc.

  • Reply 92 of 157
    thepixeldocthepixeldoc Posts: 2,257member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by macarena View Post


    Whether or not MS builds its own tablet, I think a Windows tablet has a reasonable chance of success for following reasons:


    - MS still has a lions share of desktop OS - so any perceived compatibility or familiarity will give Windows tablets a boost out of the gate - even if there is no real similarity.<snip>



    I fully agree with the rest of your speculation after the <snip>.


     


    However... once again I'll point out that the consumer side needs to be priority number 2, and has no relation whatsoever to MS's dominant desktop position. Win8 is a completely new desktop experience for many people. I've experienced a lot of consumer-types not even taking to Win7 so well, and begging to return to WinXP... which in almost all cases I don't allow them to, and still expect my future support.


     


    I have in a couple of cases moved people to Ubuntu actually, rather than go back to WinXP, and the acceptance in those special cases has been quite good. Better than Win7 even. What irks and scares most people with Windows... is security.


     


    EVEN though Win7 with a few tweaks and free progs is very secure, everything that ever goes wrong with a WinBox, comes down to me getting a call starting with, "I think I have a virus or trojan".


     


    Funny that, and the real "Monkey" on the "Boy" IMHO.

  • Reply 93 of 157
    tribalogicaltribalogical Posts: 1,182member

    Quote:



    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post





    That's just amazing. Microsoft wants $80 per device - when most of the devices will probably sell for $200-300? What are they smoking?

    And, more importantly, if they're getting that much of a license fee, why bother making the hardware?


     


    Probably because they're NOT getting the license fee… nobody's buying. Doing the math on their current business model, it's likely they only have two choices, charge a high fee, or make it themselves.


     


    Seems to me they need to rethink their business model just a tad...

  • Reply 94 of 157


    Will it synch with the Zune and Windows Phone????

  • Reply 95 of 157
    tribalogicaltribalogical Posts: 1,182member

    Quote:



    Originally Posted by rtm135 View Post


    Yeah that's hilarious.  I remember the same "Fisher Price" type joke being made about Windows XP...  you guys may have heard of it...  it's one of the most popular OS's in the world.


     


    Nobody likes a bunch of Zealots.  You hurt the Apple brand more than you help it.


     



     


    Oh come on now! Someone cracks a joke and you call them a "zealot"? A tad sensitive there, aren't we? A tad... zealot-like... even?


     


    And it's an Apple rumor/fan site. Chock full of Enthusiasts, evangelists, and yes, even the occasional "zealot" (whom most of us are as likely to push back on as easily as you might). In fact, we're mostly not "hostile" to M$. Most just highly prefer our choice of OS and hardware, yes, and many migrated here, from what we perceived as a miserable existence in the M$ world, and yes many aren't too fond of how M$ has done or does business.


     


    The Fisher Price thing was funny… I thought anyway...


     


     


    Does all that qualify me as a zealot?


     


    (For that matter, does thinking that Steve Balmer is a complete buffoon and a horrid embarrassment to M$ make me a zealot?)

  • Reply 96 of 157
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    Just thought I'd chip in an opinion here as a an "all in" Apple fan and consultant.

    I think MS might be able to pull this off, and agree with KarmaDave and select others that:
    • a) it will be the "alternative tablet OS" to iOS rather than Android, and
    • b) Win8 on tablets just might overtake iOS.

    I agree with the first statement. Microsoft has the potential to take a serious bite out of Android sales (and a much smaller bite out of iOS sales). Android seems to be the OS for people who don't want an iPhone or iPad for some reason (often price). There are few people (other than a small number of geeks) who buy Android because it offers them something they really want. Furthermore, handset manufacturers who license Android must be very concerned about Google's acquisition of Motorola. In spite of Google's promises, the licensees are now competing with the licensor. Some of them will fork Android (Amazon) and others will look harder at Windows RT than they might have otherwise.

    The second statement is pretty questionable. Microsoft has a LONG way to go before they approach iOS. First, they have to develop a good ecosystem. That means not only apps, but their phones and tablets and desktop systems need to work together in a smooth, transparent way. That's going to take a lot of work. More importantly, they need to figure out their business model. If they plan to be the manufacturer of tablets, they'd better rely on experience from their xBox people. Other than the xBox, their experience involves licensing, not manufacturing. And it's extremely difficult to do both - as I believe Google/Motorola is about to find out.

    IF Microsoft is truly honest with itself, they will realize that the consumer market is all tied up... for now at least... by Apple and Google. What neither of those competitors (include RIM here as well) have... or are going to have any time soon... is the deep reach into the backrooms of the enterprise that MS does.

    While your statement is correct, it also contains several unstated assumptions. Ask RIM how well 'focus on the enterprise market where you're strong' has worked out.

    There seems to be a switch in purchasing patterns over the last 10 years. Before that, the fact that many businesses required Windows drove many people to buy Windows at home. Currently, the opposite seems to be true - the fact that so many people are buying Apple products for personal use seems to be driving them into the Enterprise. I do not believe Microsoft can afford to give up the consumer market - it is far too important in maintaining their business position.
  • Reply 97 of 157
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,527member


    At first reading of this (Microsoft to build their own tablet), my instant reaction was that it would be a non-starter.


     


    Reading forum comments here, and elsewhere, it seems that most agree -- but some interesting ideas have been offered.


     


    So, all this info has been macerating in my subconscious...  and like a few others, I think there may be some possibilities:


     


    1) There may be a large audience for a Windows RT Tablet, if...


     


    2) There may be a business model where MS and OEMS can both offer Windows RT Tablets, if...


     


    The big "ifs" are:


     


    -- is MS astute enough to understand what they need to do, and when


    -- is MS agile enough to carry it off


     


    Note:  This post is about Windows 8 RT (ARM) Tablets (whatever they are called... some of the above, all of the above, any of the above, etc.).  Windows 8 Intel tablets are another topic altogether.


     


     


    Some posters, here, have offered up some pretty good ideas -- and it is just possible that MS could pull it off.


     


     


    The one thing, for me, that doesn't "compute" is:  Where are the manufacturing lines and supply chains... I don't believe that MS can get by with a place-holder for a product to be delivered in 6-12 months.

  • Reply 98 of 157
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,527member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post


    Just thought I'd chip in an opinion here as a an "all in" Apple fan and consultant.


     


    I think MS might be able to pull this off, and agree with KarmaDave and select others that:



    • a) it will be the "alternative tablet OS" to iOS rather than Android, and


    • b) Win8 on tablets just might overtake iOS.


     


    Pretty bold, but let's be honest here. There's still millions upon millions of enterprises CIOs/IT departments waiting to see what they'll be able to do when MS finally delivers something.


     


    IF Microsoft can build a tablet that:



    • a) works smooth... which by all reviews and accounts, it already does;


    • b) integrates compatible versions of Office/Exchange and Office365... which is a no-brainer really;


    • c) creates tools that allow fast deployment of business proprietary back-end software for Win8RT,


    • d) stays price competitive AND offers stellar business support....


     


    ...they're on-track to do what an analyst said they'd do be 2015. It was reported here on AI... and of course wildly scoffed at.


     


    IF Microsoft is truly honest with itself, they will realize that the consumer market is all tied up... for now at least... by Apple and Google. What neither of those competitors (include RIM here as well) have... or are going to have any time soon... is the deep reach into the backrooms of the enterprise that MS does.


     


    It took something like 10+ years before Microsoft finally had a "consumer" hit with WinXP. I don't count Win98, because it was still mostly for the Geeks & Gamers consumer... not soccer-moms, kids, or grandparents.


     


    I did the most consumer WinXP installations using SP2 even, which came out late summer 2004. Imagine that!? Almost 20 years before a real consumer got onto a computer that functioned similar to a Mac. Which I'll agree, is somewhat of a misnomer :)


     


    I'm sure MS will even open Win8 up to modding eventually... so the Metro-Tiles may be short-lived for those that really hate it.


     


    IF Microsoft sticks to there core and ".exe--cutes" this well... they'll be OK.


     


    PS. As a consultant, I have to stay up-to-date with what my customers want and need. I'm hearing all kinds of chatter and wishful-thinking from my business customers re: Win8... and I'm just doing my homework for that day when they all want Win8RT-SP2. That's how *I* stay in business.



     


    This is a great post!


     


    I have been retired for a while so I have no IT currency.   Also, our household is completely Windows/Office free (other than services Apple licenses from MS).


     


     


    I want to concentrate on a part of the above post, and ask a few questions to get current?


     


     


     


    Quote:


    IF Microsoft can build a tablet that:



    • a) works smooth... which by all reviews and accounts, it already does;


    • b) integrates compatible versions of Office/Exchange and Office365... which is a no-brainer really;


    • c) creates tools that allow fast deployment of business proprietary back-end software for Win8RT,


    • d) stays price competitive AND offers stellar business support....




     


    Specifically:


     


    b) How much compatibility do Office apps (running on ARM) really need to satisfy, say, 80% of IT needs?  Let's assume that MS could rethink Word/Excel and friends, slim them down to satisfy most users, then add an elegant UI.


     


    c) Where does MS-Access fit in all this?  Is it the tool/glue that interfaces the back-end proprietary software?  MS-Access was all the rage in the 90s -- but I never hear about it anymore.  If not Access, what tools are needed?

  • Reply 99 of 157
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    Specifically:

    b) How much compatibility do Office apps (running on ARM) really need to satisfy, say, 80% of IT needs?  Let's assume that MS could rethink Word/Excel and friends, slim them down to satisfy most users, then add an elegant UI.

    I think you're grossly underestimating the necessary level of compatibility. Most people open dozens, if not hundreds, of documents in an average week. if even a couple percent are messed up because of compatibility problems, that will prevent the adoption of alternatives. Look at OpenOffice. Compatibility is pretty good - probably 95+% for the documents that I use. But the fact that even a couple percent might be unreadable is a problem. The risk that I would send something to a customer and THEY might not be able to read it is an even greater problem. That is, IMHO, the main reason that Office alternatives never caught on.
    c) Where does MS-Access fit in all this?  Is it the tool/glue that interfaces the back-end proprietary software?  MS-Access was all the rage in the 90s -- but I never hear about it anymore.  If not Access, what tools are needed?

    Quite a few people still use Access, although many don't realize it. Often, when someone says that they have a back office tool which requires Windows, it may be Access. There's really not much of an alternative if your business uses Access.
  • Reply 100 of 157
    joshajosha Posts: 901member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by quinney View Post


    Maybe Microsoft will name their new tablet "the Acme".



    More likely will be  called Zap- Ballmer.


    It's main objective is likely to stop M$ employees from using iPads  at work.

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