Spotify reportedly number two revenue source for record labels, still far behind iTunes

2»

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 37
    porchlandporchland Posts: 478member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post





    Of course you can. iTunes even lets you do that itself.


     


    iTunes Store Terms and Conditions:


     


    Quote:


    You agree that the iTunes Service and certain iTunes Products include security technology that limits your use of iTunes Products and that, whether or not iTunes Products are limited by security technology, you shall use iTunes Products in compliance with the applicable usage rules established by Apple and its licensors (“Usage Rules”), and that any other use of the iTunes Products may constitute a copyright infringement. Any security technology is an inseparable part of the iTunes Products. Apple reserves the right to modify the Usage Rules at any time. You agree not to violate, circumvent, reverse-engineer, decompile, disassemble, or otherwise tamper with any of the security technology related to such Usage Rules for any reason—or to attempt or assist another person to do so. Usage Rules may be controlled and monitored by Apple for compliance purposes, and Apple reserves the right to enforce the Usage Rules without notice to you.



     


    Things you can't do with stuff that you "own":


     


    Quote:


    USAGE RULES


    (i) You shall be authorized to use iTunes Products only for personal, noncommercial use.


    (ii) You shall be authorized to use iTunes Products on five iTunes-authorized devices at any time, except for Content Rentals (see below).


    (iii) You shall be able to store iTunes Products from up to five different Accounts at a time on compatible devices, provided that each iPhone may sync tone iTunes Products with only a single iTunes-authorized device at a time, and syncing an iPhone with a different iTunes-authorized device will cause tone iTunes Products stored on that iPhone to be erased.


    (iv) You shall be authorized to burn an audio playlist up to seven times.


    (v) You shall not be entitled to burn video iTunes Products or tone iTunes Products.


    (vi) iTunes Plus Products do not contain security technology that limits your usage of such products, and Usage Rules (ii) – (v) do not apply to iTunes Plus Products. You may copy, store, and burn iTunes Plus Products as reasonably necessary for personal, noncommercial use.


    (vii) You shall be able to manually sync a movie from at least one iTunes-authorized device to devices that have manual sync mode, provided that the movie is associated with an Account on the primary iTunes-authorized device, where the primary iTunes-authorized device is the one that was first synced with the device or the one that you subsequently designate as primary using iTunes.


    (viii) An HDCP connection is required to view content transmitted over HDMI.


    (ix) Content Rentals


    (a) Content rentals are viewable on only one device at a time. You must be connected to the iTunes Service when moving rentals, and you may do so only between your computer and other compatible devices. Content rented using your Apple TV, iPad, iPhone 4, or iPod touch (4th generation) may not be moved. If you move a rental to a compatible device and then use the iTunes Service to restore that device, or choose Settings > Reset > Erase all content and settings on that device, the rental will be permanently deleted.


    (b) You have thirty (30) days after downloading a rental to begin viewing. Once you begin viewing, you have twenty-four (24) hours to finish viewing a movie. Stopping, pausing, or restarting a rental does not extend the available time for viewing.


    Some iTunes Products, including but not limited to Content rentals, may be downloaded only once and cannot be replaced if lost for any reason. It is your responsibility not to lose, destroy, or damage iTunes Products once downloaded, and you may wish to back them up.


    The delivery of iTunes Products does not transfer to you any commercial or promotional use rights in the iTunes Products. Any burning or exporting capabilities are solely an accommodation to you and shall not constitute a grant, waiver, or other limitation of any rights of the copyright owners in any content embodied in any iTunes Product.


    You acknowledge that, because some aspects of the iTunes Service, iTunes Products, and administration of the Usage Rules entails the ongoing involvement of Apple, if Apple changes any part of or discontinues the iTunes Service, which Apple may do at its election, you may not be able to use iTunes Products to the same extent as prior to such change or discontinuation, and that Apple shall have no liability to you in such case.



  • Reply 22 of 37
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    porchland wrote: »
    You may copy, store, and burn iTunes Plus Products as reasonably necessary for personal, noncommercial use.

    Thanks for combing that to prove my point!

    Additionally, point five is only for the playback thereof. You can make copies for the purpose of backup.
  • Reply 23 of 37
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    File's on my machine. I own it.

    Technically, you own only the hard disk or other media. You do not own the content. Read the iTunes license.
    Of course you can. iTunes even lets you do that itself.

    Wrong. I specifically stated that you couldn't 'make copies like you could if you owned it.'

    You can make copies for backup purposes - and that's it.

    If you owned it, you could make a million copies and distribute them to anyone you wished. Thus, you are not able to make copies like you could if you own it as I said.
  • Reply 24 of 37
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    jragosta wrote: »
    Wrong. I specifically stated that you couldn't 'make copies like you could if you owned it.' You can make copies for backup purposes - and that's it. If you owned it, you could make a million copies and distribute them to anyone you wished. Thus, you are not able to make copies like you could if you own it as I said.

    If you want to be entirely accurate, you can do just that. I'm simply talking about legally. I don't believe you can make legal (viewable) backups of any other video media, either.
  • Reply 25 of 37
    fazzterfazzter Posts: 120member


    "File's on my machine. I own it." - Tallest Skil


     


    You seriously believe that's all it takes to own digital media?


     


    imageimageimage

  • Reply 26 of 37
    hill60hill60 Posts: 6,992member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jasenj1 View Post


    Spotify is great. I have a free account and listen to it non-stop at work every day. Sound quality is way better than XM in the car. I believe the free streams are supposed to be lower quality than the paid people get, but I've been very happy. The radio feature works well, too. I get songs that are generally close to the band I've chosen and it's a good way to discover new music.


     


    +1.


     


    - Jasen.



    The free account in Australia is useless, you can't stream anything except from a PC over wifi.


     


    They don't even accept iTunes cards (which I buy at a discount) for payment of $12 a month here.


     


    There is no way to delete your account, their support has to do it, although they were fairly prompt with my request.


     


    I just stick with radio streaming Apps, particularly Triple J Unearthed.

  • Reply 27 of 37
    hill60hill60 Posts: 6,992member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Porchland View Post




    I am baffled that Apple has not come out with any content subscription packages to try and blunt Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime, Spotify, Pandora, etc., from taking away iTunes Store purchases.



     


    I think it comes more from the content providers side, with them refusing Apple streaming licenses, due to their fear of being too locked in to iTunes as the number one provider of content.

  • Reply 28 of 37
    tymmotymmo Posts: 1member


    a single backup copy is what I know as well as being legal in terms of recording or burning content from these platforms. i sometimes record tracks that I really like from spotify. is that in order? there is this soft called tunebite which records from the sound card and if I find a song that I really like I wanna be able to play it whenever so I record it and then export it to my player. as long as i don't sell these copies or whatever, it should be legal, right? I know I was also a little bit worried but everywhere I looked for more info, this is the response I got.

     

  • Reply 29 of 37


    I love Spotify. I think its business model is better consumer-wise than iTunes Store's one.


     


    It is much better to buy streaming rights to all songs at once as a monthly subscription than to purchase each song/album separately (iTunes Store) and only to have them available  on up to 5 PC - DRM-enabled tracks are just too restrictive.

  • Reply 30 of 37
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member


    Originally Posted by rangerBoar View Post


    DRM-enabled tracks are just too restrictive.



     


    Except they're not DRM-restricted.

  • Reply 31 of 37
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,896member


    Here's a survey that caught me by surprise regarding iTunes and music listening in general.


     


    http://techcrunch.com/2012/08/14/youtube-is-for-music/


     


    According to Nielsen’s latest “Music 360 ” report, 48% of consumers in the U.S. still see radio as the dominant way to discover new music. For almost two-thirds of U.S. teenagers, however, Google’s YouTube is now a more important source of music than radio (54%), iTunes (53%) and CDs (50%).


    Despite the growing popularity of Internet music services among teens, about a third of them still bought a CD in the last year and among all respondents, 55% said physical CDs are still a very or fairly good value.

  • Reply 32 of 37
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    gatorguy wrote: »
    Here's a survey that caught me by surprise regarding iTunes and music listening in general.

    http://techcrunch.com/2012/08/14/youtube-is-for-music/

    <p style="margin-bottom:12.5px;font-size:14px;line-height:20px;font-family:helvetica, arial, clean, sans-serif;">According to Nielsen’s latest “Music 360 ” report, 48% of consumers in the U.S. still see radio as the dominant way to discover new music. For almost two-thirds of U.S. teenagers, however, Google’s YouTube is now a more important source of music than radio (54%), iTunes (53%) and CDs (50%).</p>

    <p style="margin-top:12.5px;margin-bottom:12.5px;font-size:14px;line-height:20px;font-family:helvetica, arial, clean, sans-serif;">Despite the growing popularity of Internet music services among teens, about a third of them still bought a CD in the last year and among all respondents, 55% said physical CDs are still a very or fairly good value.</p>

    I'm probably about half way between a teenager and an Applebaum yet I find most new music through YouTube. Sometimes I'm sent a link, other times it's being promotes by Vevo when I'm listening/watching another artist's song, and sometimes it catches my eyes when being shown on the right in a thumbnail.
  • Reply 33 of 37

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post





    File's on my machine. I own it.


     


    If you own it, then you can also sell it, correct? I own an apartment building and I can sell it whenever and to whomever I want - in fact, it's for sale right now. Try that with those files you have on your machine, that you *think* that you own, and let us know how that turns out. I know several excellent attorneys. After you get that "knock at the door", just send me a PM and I'll forward their numbers to you. Oh, and the "I didn't know" defense tends not to be the best strategy when standing before a judge. image

  • Reply 34 of 37
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member


    Originally Posted by Jag_Warrior View Post

    If you own it, then you can also sell it, correct?


     


    I don't see why not.

  • Reply 35 of 37

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     


    I don't see why not.





    Right. So give it the old smell test. Click this http://www.Ebay.com and list *your* song files for sale, either individually or as a package. Do let me know how that works out. And if you know of anyone looking for a 6 unit garden style apartment building, please send them my way. I actually have a deed of ownership to what I'm selling though. ;)

  • Reply 36 of 37
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member


    Originally Posted by Jag_Warrior View Post

    I actually have a deed of ownership to what I'm selling though. ;)


     


    I also have proof of ownership. I fail to see the issue here. It's on me to not use the files once I've sold them away, just as it's on me to not steal my car back if I sell it to someone else, seeing as I quite probably have a spare key for it.

  • Reply 37 of 37

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     


    I also have proof of ownership. I fail to see the issue here. It's on me to not use the files once I've sold them away, just as it's on me to not steal my car back if I sell it to someone else, seeing as I quite probably have a spare key for it.





    Yes, if you do indeed own it, you should be able to sell it, lease it or even give it away. But it's not me that you'll have to convince if you proceed with a sale of these digital files. Like I said, just go to Ebay, Amazon or your site of choice and put them up for sale. But keep a daily blog so that we can all follow your plight (from a safe distance).


     


    There's a guy who had something to do with a site called Nappy or Nipster or Napster... something like that. He might know a dude who knows a dude who'll be able to help you out.

Sign In or Register to comment.